Jump to content
Unexplained Mysteries uses cookies. By using the site you consent to our use of cookies as per our Cookie Policy.
Close X
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
zoser

Stonehenge - Bluestone Acoustic Properties

30 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

zoser

Some may find this interesting. Yet more information coming to light regarding the enigma of megalithic sites.

Ties in with the GP acoustic properties and suggests what I have always known that these sites were actively radiating energy of some kind.

Slowly but surely the truth is being revealed.

STONES = NOTES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-26417976

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sir Wearer of Hats

I'm struggling to see how "they make a noise" connects with your "world wide web of energy" theory Zoser.

I can see them using the stones for a bit of "flash and bang" to enhance whatever ceremony went on in Stonehenge though, and on the "pre-Romanic man was smarter then we're being told by many historians" front this news is indeed both new and worthwhile.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr.United_Nations

Some sort of contacting the dead or worship?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mr.United_Nations

I'm struggling to see how "they make a noise" connects with your "world wide web of energy" theory Zoser.

I can see them using the stones for a bit of "flash and bang" to enhance whatever ceremony went on in Stonehenge though, and on the "pre-Romanic man was smarter then we're being told by many historians" front this news is indeed both new and worthwhile.

its when you make bells, or stone age bells, you hollow out the rock andyou bang the inside to make a noise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
zoser

I'm struggling to see how "they make a noise" connects with your "world wide web of energy" theory Zoser.

I can see them using the stones for a bit of "flash and bang" to enhance whatever ceremony went on in Stonehenge though, and on the "pre-Romanic man was smarter then we're being told by many historians" front this news is indeed both new and worthwhile.

Think it through. People don't go to the trouble of erecting multiple tonne blocks using different stone types and sound properties for no good reason.

These things must have had resonant qualities. For what, why and how is what you should be thinking.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
zoser

its when you make bells, or stone age bells, you hollow out the rock andyou bang the inside to make a noise

its when you make bells, or stone age bells, you hollow out the rock andyou bang the inside to make a noise

'Just like that'. As the great Tommy Cooper would say. Very helpful Mr N

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DecoNoir

Think it through. People don't go to the trouble of erecting multiple tonne blocks using different stone types and sound properties for no good reason.

These things must have had resonant qualities. For what, why and how is what you should be thinking.

Unless they just happened upon it. After all, nobody set out to invent penicillin.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
toast

This is not an enigma, it`s called resonance frequency. It needs to be activated by an external impuls.

So no space for hippie-science here.

Edited by toast
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hectosaucer

I still subscribe to the ancient calendar/observatory theory.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
keithisco

I still go with the theory that glaciers transported the Bluestones to the general vicinity of Stonehenge, some 30 thousand years ago, and were utilised due to their proximity to the building site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Puzzler

This is the best explanation I've heard, that it was a kind of hospital, a healing centre. The key is in the bluestones and where they came from, Preseli, according to some new research.

What is most remarkable about Preseli is the plethora of springs on the hillside. Many "holy wells" have been ascribed miraculous healing powers throughout history. But Preseli's are remarkable for their number and for the dolmens, enclosures and barrows surrounding the area. More remarkable still, in front of each are bluestones, rearranged and decorated as if to create an altar and a pool. This was clearly a place of prehistoric pilgrimage, and the bluestones were thought to hold its magic.

By the agrarian revolution of the third millennium BC Stonehenge was already an important site, but its extension about 2300BC was clearly intended by its guardians to make it a major pilgrimage attraction. This needed some sensational draw, and what could be more sensational than a henge composed of the fabled Preseli bluestones, fount of a hundred holy wells? It was worth any Olympian expense.

The medieval historian Geoffrey of Monmouth told of a belief in the healing power of Stonehenge's stones, brought by Arthur's magician, Merlin, "from Ireland", where stones have long had magic properties. Geoffrey's stories are ridiculed, but his folk memory might contain a grain of truth. Could the appeal of the bluestones lie not in ancestor worship or astronomical ritual but in the power these objects were thought to hold back in Preseli?

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2006/dec/01/arts.heritage

But I have heard the resonance frequency theory idea too.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Taun

The theory i'm still leaning toward is that it was a ritual center, tied in with "woodhenge"... with the Woodhenge representing Life forces and stonehenge representing death, and the cycle of life...

After all weren't the two centers tied together by an ancient road - or at least I seem to remember reading that...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Macroramphosis

I think part healing centre and part religious site is close to the truth. Standing stones do store energy according to dowsers, and electro-magnetic detecting equipment has successfully located and recorded the strong electromagnetic signals which are emitted by the standing stones at Stonehenge. Indeed, one team at Stonehenge had a powerful force damage their equipment during recording whilst recording the harmonic frequency levels of energy lines within the site - it makes one wonder about the theories surrounding the patterned damage caused to the chullpas of Sillustani, Peru - another location where dowsers have reputedly located and recorded energy emitted by megalithic stones.

In addition, of course, Stonehenge and its environs are riddled with underground water sources - springs and wells. Underground water is a great conductor of electromagnetic energy and as Maria Wheatley says, "....numerous underground streams radiate from beneath the Heel Stone and the Altar Stone; these streams generate magnetic power as well as producing a triad water line which water diviners are familiar with. Standing stones are rooted in the earth and they are invariably sited above energy lines or water lines. The megaliths act like batteries, continually absorbing and releasing this form of magnetic energy, which may have been used for healing purposes."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Macroramphosis

The theory i'm still leaning toward is that it was a ritual center, tied in with "woodhenge"... with the Woodhenge representing Life forces and stonehenge representing death, and the cycle of life...

After all weren't the two centers tied together by an ancient road - or at least I seem to remember reading that...

I've often wondered whether Woodhenge was not a giant field shelter for the many pilgrims that would have come to Stonehenge. The posts may have supported temporary roofs of skins or canvases when needed. If Stonehenge was a healing shelter then many pilgrims may have been bedridden or on litters. They would have to have been sheltered somewhere. Woodhenge itself is built on geo-spirals and ley lines and the wooden posts would not have absorbed the healing energy like stone would have - the ancients might have felt that the energy went to better use passing directly into people lying or sitting on the ground there. There certainly has to be a distinct reason why wood was used instead of stone as it was throughout the rest of the area.

Edited by Macroramphosis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aquatus1

I can't help but think that these things have been around for so long and have been used for so many different things by so many different people that trying to determine any one individual purpose is a largely pointless endeavor.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Leonardo

Some may find this interesting. Yet more information coming to light regarding the enigma of megalithic sites.

Ties in with the GP acoustic properties and suggests what I have always known that these sites were actively radiating energy of some kind.

Slowly but surely the truth is being revealed.

STONES = NOTES

http://www.bbc.co.uk...tshire-26417976

This is a complete misinterpretation of the discovery, and the article.

The stones 'ring' when struck - this has nothing to do with 'resonant energy' or any such New Age claptrap. The acoustic properties of the stones may have been used in ceremonies, with people standing beside them striking them with wooden mallets to 'ring' them. This would enhance the ceremonial atmosphere, perhaps suggesting why these stones (or this type of stone) were chosen.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
seeder

Wiki suggests Stonehenge was for burials

"Archaeological evidence found by the Stonehenge Riverside Project in 2008 indicates that Stonehenge could have been a burial ground from its earliest beginnings.[8] The dating of cremated remains found on the site indicate that deposits contain human bone from as early as 3000 BC, when the ditch and bank were first dug. Such deposits continued at Stonehenge for at least another 500 years.[9] The site is a place of religious significance and pilgrimage in Neo-Druidry."

But what always gets me is why always be wowed at Stonehenge? Why not The Callanish Stones too?

800px-Callanish-circle.jpg

800px-Callanish_Stones_in_summer_2012_%287%29.JPG

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callanish_Stones

Or in fact, any of the many and varied stone circles, and there are a lot, as seen here

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_stone_circles

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Macroramphosis

Leonardo,

Here's a little reading for you that may intrigue you enough that you take another look at the 'claptrap". :) It's from the New Scientist originally.

Edited by Macroramphosis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Leonardo

Leonardo,

Here's a little reading for you that may intrigue you enough that you take another look at the 'claptrap". :) It's from the New Scientist originally.

Ultrasound is an established phenomenon and I don't see how it is connected with Stonehenge or the bluestones used there?

The OP article was concerning the acoustic properties of those stones, which I addressed as not being at all related to "earth energies" or "resonant energies". That the stones rung when struck was observed with stones lying in their natural state. It takes little imagination to envisage their use as a percussive accompaniment to ritual and ceremony, without resorting to more fanciful explanations.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sir Wearer of Hats

I wonder, do the resonating stones have an effect of enhancing people's voices? Are you louder when standing on/near the stones as opposed to when you're not?

Maybe they were used as loudspeakers.

And Zoser, a drum resonates when struck with kinetic energy, it doesn't mean I can power my fridge with one. The ability to transfer one type of energy from one form to another doesn't mean it can transfer a different type of energy to another.

Conversely, the number of "Stonehenges" being found worldwide increase yearly. In fact, the only country which doesn't seem to have any unnatural stone formations is (you guess it) the one that has the longest recorded history of habitation - Australia. We DO have a large number of natural rock formations that are similar to henges though, maybe we didn't need the artificial ones to receive the power supply.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DieChecker

Think it through. People don't go to the trouble of erecting multiple tonne blocks using different stone types and sound properties for no good reason.

These things must have had resonant qualities. For what, why and how is what you should be thinking.

Even if it was only as a burial site, that still does not count as "no good reason".

I'm agreeing with Leonardo, the sounds generated has nothing to do with electricity or powering anything. It most likely was used to heighten the reliigious experience.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
onesixoneeight

I stood in the centre of Stonehenge once upon a time.

There is something almost tangible in the air there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thorvir

I stood in the centre of Stonehenge once upon a time.

There is something almost tangible in the air there.

Yeah, it was probably rain. You were in Britain, after all.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Macroramphosis

From what I can gather at a quick glance, the average rainfall in Noblesville seems to be over 42" a year. At Stonehenge it's under 10" a year.

Just saying...... :innocent:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thorvir

From what I can gather at a quick glance, the average rainfall in Noblesville seems to be over 42" a year. At Stonehenge it's under 10" a year.

Just saying...... :innocent:

I should be having quite a bit more feelings of supernatural "tangibility" then. I need to get outside more often!!!

Oh, and nice job on missing the sarcasm I posted. Please do better next time. :)

Edited by Hida Akechi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.