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bendigger0

The Nazca Spider

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bendigger0

Among the well-known Nazca geo-glyphs is the Spider glyph. The Spider is identified as a Ricinulei, a tiny creature living in the remotest Amazon basin. How on Earth did the Nazca Spider makers become aware of this spider and it's microscopically minute reproductive organ (seen at the end of the long leg extension)?

http://www.ahautravel.com/2012/2012chautauqua_nazca.htm

Edited by Saru
Replaced image with link for copyright reasons

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DieChecker

So.... They don't have spiders in Peru? I think they do.

I googled your Amazon spider. It is not an exact match....

ricinulei.jpg

EDIT:

Any of the many types of orb spiders found in Peru are a better match. At least as far as the legs.

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Rlyeh

Among the well-known Nazca geo-glyphs is the Spider glyph. The Spider is identified as a Ricinulei, a tiny creature living in the remotest Amazon basin. How on Earth did the Nazca Spider makers become aware of this spider and it's microscopically minute reproductive organ (seen at the end of the long leg extension)?

A microscopic organ that is nearly as large as it's body, and a spider that looks nothing like the Ricinulei.

It's called confirmation bias.

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toast

snip

Edited by toast

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Thorvir

The Nazca Spider

Nice example of ancient, human-made, artwork, with some religious significance.

No need to include aliens, as usual, but go ahead, jump to the wildest conclusions without doing on iota of critical thinking on it.

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g00dfella

I googled your Amazon spider. It is not an exact match....

There are several types of Ricinulei, about 60 of them...can't just post the first pic you see.

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beelzebufo

The Nazca Spider is not nearly detailed or anatomically correct enough to claim as a specific species. Doing this is like looking at Egypt's Saqqara Bird artifact (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saqqara_Bird), and claiming that it represents an American Kestrel, which is only found in the Americas, just to make it more mysterious.

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scorpiosonic

The Nazca Spider

Nice example of ancient, human-made, artwork, with some religious significance.

No need to include aliens, as usual, but go ahead, jump to the wildest conclusions without doing on iota of critical thinking on it.

OK....they couldn't have had air balloons, :no: (err, so it musta been :alien: :alien: :alien: ) and weren't smart enough to do the surveying, etc. ;)

Edit to mention the Orion alignment.

Edited by scorpiosonic

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Q-C

I don't even see a "spider". I see an ant. An ant mimicking spider? Creative liberties (8-legged ant)? Mythological liberties (spider/ant combo)?

So... definitely hard to discern a particular spider species from that art alone, imo.

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bendigger0

Why are you talking about aliens? SOME experts have identified the species as Ricinulei. I believe the identification is related to the unusual location of the reproductive organ (on the end of the long "leg"). Is this spider actually identifiable from this glyph?

post-145406-0-47649200-1399233942_thumb.

Edited by bendigger0

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jaylemurph

Why are you talking about aliens? SOME experts have identified the species as Ricinulei. I believe the identification is related to the unusual location of the reproductive organ (on the end of the long "leg"). Is this spider actually identifiable from this glyph?

post-145406-0-47649200-1399233942_thumb.

Yes, "Anonymous" /is/ a respected expert with notable credentials. I see no reason whatsoever to questions his diktats.

--Jaylemurph

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DieChecker

There are several types of Ricinulei, about 60 of them...can't just post the first pic you see.

Do any of the 60 match the Nazca spider? You brought it up.... :yes:

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theotherguy

What's going on with the three-pronged head on the Nazca lines? That doesn't really match either spider or Ricinulei.

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Kenemet

Why are you talking about aliens? SOME experts have identified the species as Ricinulei.

Could you link to whatever you found that showed the identification? We can then check to see if it's a legit identification or if it's fairly bogus.

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Rafterman

Among the well-known Nazca geo-glyphs is the Spider glyph. The Spider is identified as a Ricinulei, a tiny creature living in the remotest Amazon basin. How on Earth did the Nazca Spider makers become aware of this spider and it's microscopically minute reproductive organ (seen at the end of the long leg extension)?

http://www.ahautrave...auqua_nazca.htm

To borrow a bit from Freud "sometimes a spider is just a spider".

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Rafterman

What's going on with the three-pronged head on the Nazca lines? That doesn't really match either spider or Ricinulei.

Why do folks seem to think that ancient artwork is supposed to be viewed as a biology textbook?

Would anyone look at this and think that it's supposed to be a realistic drawing of a spider?

post-106978-0-41206400-1399305340_thumb.

Edited by Rafterman
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Perceptivum

Alright. I took a look at several pictures of the order ricinulei of the arachnid group. These spiders are also known as hooded tickspiders. From what I can assess, the Nazca spider and the ricinulei have only one thing in common, the eight legs.

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g00dfella

Do any of the 60 match the Nazca spider? You brought it up.... :yes:

Don't have the time to do that type of comparison...

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theotherguy

Why do folks seem to think that ancient artwork is supposed to be viewed as a biology textbook?

Would anyone look at this and think that it's supposed to be a realistic drawing of a spider?

post-106978-0-41206400-1399305340_thumb.

True, but not quite what I was aiming for. The three prongs are sort of an odd detail to drop on a conceptualized image of a spider. Does it have any symbolic significance?

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bendigger0

really sorry i asked...

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DieChecker

Don't have the time to do that type of comparison...

Well, I took 15 minutes and looked at about 1000 pics of these arachnids, and not a single one was even close to the Nazca spider. Not. Even. Close.

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DieChecker

Could you link to whatever you found that showed the identification? We can then check to see if it's a legit identification or if it's fairly bogus.

I agree with this. If there is some resource to indicate how such an identification was established, that would be cool to read. :tu:

Alright. I took a look at several pictures of the order ricinulei of the arachnid group. These spiders are also known as hooded tickspiders. From what I can assess, the Nazca spider and the ricinulei have only one thing in common, the eight legs.

I just spent about 15 minutes looking over about 1000 pics and I didn't see any more similarity then you did. :tu:

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PlanB

I don't even see a "spider". I see an ant. An ant mimicking spider? Creative liberties (8-legged ant)? Mythological liberties (spider/ant combo)?

So... definitely hard to discern a particular spider species from that art alone, imo.

There actually are many species of spiders that mimic ants for the sake of preying upon them. Looking at the giant glyph, my first impression is that of an ant -- it seems to to contain the three body segments of an insect: abdomen, thorax and head. Spiders do no have the middle thorax section, just engine and caboose. But then again, the drawing has the 8 legs characteristic of a spider. So, not sure what to make of it. Even today, people confuse spiders with insects. Maybe the artist meant to do an ant, accidentally started working on a seventh leg, and just said, "Screw it, I left the giant eraser at home!"

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DieChecker

Here is an ant mimicing spider that lives in.... Peru

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Q-C

it seems to to contain the three body segments of an insect: abdomen, thorax and head.

Yes, this is why it looks ant-like to me due to the three body segments. The pincers (fangs, etc) also strike me as more ant-like than spider-like.

And when I think of SA rainforest I think of ants. Lots and lots of ants.

Just my initial thoughts looking at it, but there are more insects and spiders out there than I can even dream about, so who knows what the "subject" was or if it exists as drawn.

Edited by QuiteContrary

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