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Weitter Duckss

Why is the Universe Dark?

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Frank Merton

It looks like he plagiarizes some scientific article, puts it through the translator, puts it through again back to original and then through the translator again.

I know that standards about plagiarizing aren't the same in other countries, as they sure aren't the same in Vietnam. In the States it is legal to take short excerpts of material from someone else so long as you don't change it (or so indicate where you have changed it) and give credit to the original author. This applies to any material, whether published or not, whether marked with a copyright sign or not. Even material in public domain must not be copied without giving credit (although this is not a legal issue, just an academic standard).

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ChrLzs

Weitter Duckss What is your language? As in, this is a predominatly english speaking forum, though we have pple from all over the world posting here.

What is your native tongue? What translator are you using? This may be what is causing the most problems here, I am not great on grammar or even sentense structure, but I am speaking english so most people can comprehend what I am attempting to say/convey.

With your posts it is hard, we are having problems understanding what you are trying say/explain/ask

I am thinking this is the problem. SO curiously just want to know, where are you from/what language is your native tongue.

I think it goes much deeper than a language or translator problem...

If it helps, a quick investamagation shows Weitter is from Zadar in Croatia, speaks Bosnian, and has his very own website here. Before popping over there, I must warn you - as seems to be common with such websites, the content is scattergunned, wordy almost beyond belief, goes on for miles on single pages (do the Weitter's of the world not understand the whole point of hyperlinks??) and much of it is totally wrong and rather silly... And I strongly advise sunglasses as his choice of colors is ... umm... well, let's just say I'm not feeling at all well after a few minutes there. It is one of few websites that deserve the term horrendous...sorry Weitter but you need to face facts.

His website title means, roughly, "The Universe Is Still Revolving".

I wish any potential visitors the very best of luck.. :D

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willowdreams

I think it goes much deeper than a language or translator problem...

If it helps, a quick investamagation shows Weitter is from Zadar in Croatia, speaks Bosnian, and has his very own website here. Before popping over there, I must warn you - as seems to be common with such websites, the content is scattergunned, wordy almost beyond belief, goes on for miles on single pages (do the Weitter's of the world not understand the whole point of hyperlinks??) and much of it is totally wrong and rather silly... And I strongly advise sunglasses as his choice of colors is ... umm... well, let's just say I'm not feeling at all well after a few minutes there. It is one of few websites that deserve the term horrendous...sorry Weitter but you need to face facts.

His website title means, roughly, "The Universe Is Still Revolving".

I wish any potential visitors the very best of luck.. :D

Oh my... the page was very bright to me, I am sitting in a dark room with just the light from this laptop monitor as my only light source...

thank you for the heads up!

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Lilly

Six pages and I'm still gonna roll with this hypothesis: Absence of light = Darkness.

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taniwha

If you can imagine a cross between Venus and an airliner passing overhead, then that's what the ISS looks like.. It's as bright as Venus (depends on distance and angle) and moves at about the same rate as an aircraft passing overhead at say 10,000 feet-ish.

Iridium flares are really cool to see, but you have to be very lucky (or use Heavens Above!) to see a bright one. The 'glint' that they throw is very shortlived (about 5-7 seconds) and travels along a very narrow path. I thoroughly recommend taking the time to try to see one. That Heaven's Above site I gave earlier will tell you when they might be coming up for your area, but the trick is to look at the map (the links are clickable and the path of the flare is overlaid onto Google Maps so you can zoom in)- go for a drive to get yourself right in the middle of the 'glint'. After you have practiced and got one right, why not take a friend/s and tell them you have been contacted by aliens and know when they will be giving their next 'sign'?

:D

If it really went from horizon to horizon and was red all the way, hmmmmm... It's not common for satellites to be visible from horizon to horizon, but it depends on latitude and angle, so I guess we'll just accept that.. Several things can cause a satellite (or the ISS..) to be red - local atmospherics (eg smoke in the atmosphere), it having solar panels that are reddish (the ISS has coppery colored solar panels), the satellite/object itself being bright red - eg painted red (might be a Soviet booster stage) or with red crinkly foil...

My best guess would be the smoky upper atmosphere or ISS solar panels, but it seems strange that you would be lucky enough for the solar panels to be catching the sun at the same angle from horizon to horizon.

I guess it could also have been something (meteor or satellite or debris) that was just heating up as it re-entered the atmosphere, but that seems unlikely - usually as soon as it hits enough atmosphere to start glowing it will fall pretty quickly.. Finally, sometimes very high-flying planes may have a very bright red nav light and you may not be able to detect the usual flashing strobe that gives it away..

Cool! I didnt know ISS or satellites might appear coloured. Yes what you recall of the ISS and iridium flares, recalls precisely what i too have seen.

The red light though was the size of a lit-up end of a cigarette held at arms length at 45deg. The red colouring of the halo deepened outwards from the centre. Like a red xmas light. It flew west to east. Maybe the space shuttle is to blame.

If there was an afterburn trail it was not visible from that distance.

P.s nice shot of the Southern Cross! :tu:

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TheGreatBeliever

Cos there's no light

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Emma_Acid

OH GOD THE COLOURS

edit - I could probably do with learning to read this, I'm off to Croatia tomorrow!

Edited by Emma_Acid
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ChrLzs

OH GOD THE COLOURS

edit - I could probably do with learning to read this, I'm off to Croatia tomorrow!

:)

There is an "English" button at the top - it's not very obvious though.. or there's always Google Translate (if you use Chrome it may be smart enough to recognise it automatically, but sometimes that feature doesn't work).

Why not look up Weitter and offer him a coffee and a chat...... But please oh please oh please video the conversation! Having seen you in action let's just say I think there would be very few prisoners taken... :D

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Weitter Duckss

The last article on this subtopic.

Why is the Universe cold?

Traveling outside the atmosphere of Earth without the special equipment for the protection against cold would be very unwise. There is very cold and very inhospitable out there. The lowest temperatures on the poles of Earth are very pleasurable, compared to the conditions outside the atmosphere. So, why is it so pleasant and warm here on Earth and so cold in the area just outside Earth, which is, figuratively speaking, almost within a hand’s reach? These temperatures (around 100° K) can be measured only on places where there is no radiation, like for example, on the dark side of the Moon. Warmth and light are been created by the radiation waves (of Sun – in our system) when they collide with matter (visible matter, i.e. atoms). Matter is mostly incorporated into the cosmic objects, while there is almost none of it outside their atmospheres. When there is no (visible) matter, there is also no radiation colliding with it and, as a consequence, there is no warmth or light either.

However, it is not all that simple. Already here, in our Solar system, there is a clear law of nature that shows us that the matter outside the cosmic objects (i.e. invisible matter and energy) also reacts with radiation.

It can not be neglected that elementary matter (invisible matter and energy) warms up, too, for some 100°K! It is less cold closer to Sun; ~ 100°K on the dark side of Mercury. It gets colder in the space further away; it is around 30°K on the dark side of Pluto, while at the end of the system, in the Oort cloud, it is ~4°K (~-269°C). At the end of Universe, it is 2,4 – 2,7°K. Even if we did not know that there was something out there (outside the membrane, in the so-called “empty” space), from this we would be able to deduce that there was something following the laws, similar to these of the visible matter. It can also be confirmed by the constant decrease of power or intensity of the waves, with the increase of distance from the object that emits them.

All these facts confirm that this is a kind of matter, too, and it can not be denied of similarities with the visible matter, but there are also some differences between them. The only impossible thing, when discussing these facts, is connecting our space with that empty space. Empty space can not follow the same laws like those of the visible matter; it is an empty space, in which there are no laws. It can only transfer an event or action further, without affecting them in any way.

The characteristic of the visible matter (which does not possess its own energy source or hot core) and invisible one, too, is that they are increasingly colder if the amount, power and intensity of incoming radiation decreases. Warmth and light are typical of the visible matter, and the significant reduction of cold is typical of the invisible matter and energy, when influenced by the radiation waves.

By applying the analogy of the ascending sequence of events, the more we are distanced from the source of radiation, the lower are the temperatures. Between the multi-universes, they are a bit closer to the absolute zero. The temperatures decrease as the wholes grow. An endlessly large volumetric belt of energy is expanding after the last ascending whole and the temperature there is absolute zero.

By the analogy, inside this belt there is an endless quantity of the wholes, similar to that one, but it is very likely that the whole with the absolute zero temperature in it could be the outer and the last whole in the hierarchy that goes further into the 3-D infinity (at least the infinity as humankind understands it).

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Frank Merton

I wonder how often famous scientists get thick documents filled with prose like that and what they do with them.

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ChrLzs

I wonder how often famous scientists get thick documents filled with prose like that and what they do with them.

Good question. In the field I used to work in (marine biology), the answer was hardly ever if at all - I can only recall one such item being reported to me by a reasonably well-known professor, and it was largely gibberish. Destination? bin, after showing to a few folks for a giggle.. If the document is more legible and perhaps only contains a few mistakes/misunderstandings, they might get a short reply to help them re-gather their thoughts..

However I'd bet that it is different in fields like Cosmology, Quantum/Relativistic Physics and the like, where the science is a bit more .. exotic and exciting, and also at places like NASA where their achievements and media presence makes them a huge target.. These folks think that they have come up with solutions that are novel and worthy of note.... yet they quickly prove they don't even have a vague grasp of the existing theories and observations and how it all fits together. If anything is proffered to them that is contrary to their ideas, they ignore it or refuse to discuss it. See above for examples...

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Waspie_Dwarf

These folks think that they have come up with solutions that are novel and worthy of note.... yet they quickly prove they don't even have a vague grasp of the existing theories and observations and how it all fits together.

Yeah, it's difficult to provide the answer when you don't understand the question.

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy

I wonder how often famous scientists get thick documents filled with prose like that and what they do with them.

We have a saying in Danish "lodret arkivering", which translates roughly to vertical filing, or:

1703972-368596-hand-with-a-crumpled-paper-and-a-waste-paper-basket.jpg

Edited by Noteverythingisaconspiracy

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lightly

... because space does not reflect light?

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StarMountainKid
... because space does not reflect light?

I wonder if space is as dark as a closed box?

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lightly

I wonder if space is as dark as a closed box?

Nope. Space/the Universe is not dark. It is actually Filled with light. (except maybe there are places where stuff is so far apart no light reaches there?)

Being able to see stars in the night sky proves that their light is filling space but you can't see it because space does not reflect light.

It's like if you hold a flashlight and shine it on your face... the SPACE between the flashlight and your face is filled with light but you can't see it... Blow some smoke into the beam of light and BEHOLD! there it is in all it's glory .

So, light is actually invisible in space, even , so called Visible light. it's only revealed when it reflects off something... then we call it Visible light.

LoL i dunno, i guess we could say the universe is dark (even though it's filled with light) because it LOOKS dark.

Edited by lightly
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Weitter Duckss

Nope. Space/the Universe is not dark. It is actually Filled with light. (except maybe there are places where stuff is so far apart no light reaches there?)

Being able to see stars in the night sky proves that their light is filling space but you can't see it because space does not reflect light.

It's like if you hold a flashlight and shine it on your face... the SPACE between the flashlight and your face is filled with light but you can't see it... Blow some smoke into the beam of light and BEHOLD! there it is in all it's glory .

So, light is actually invisible in space, even , so called Visible light. it's only revealed when it reflects off something... then we call it Visible light.

LoL i dunno, i guess we could say the universe is dark (even though it's filled with light) because it LOOKS dark.

On Earth, I see the light before the eyes, and the universe is dark. The eyes see the difference between light and darkness.

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Frank Merton

Of what use is the sun? It only shines in the daytime when it's light anyway.

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Frank Merton

The reason I posted my question on what a leading light in a scientific field might do with a paper filled with dense nonsense is there is always a small chance it might be important, and one would not want to go down in history as the fellow who dismissed the next genius out of hand.

Of course if it is incomprehensible then that is I guess a risk one takes being prominent.

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Rlyeh

On Earth, I see the light before the eyes, and the universe is dark. The eyes see the difference between light and darkness.

Reflection, scattering, etc. You can't see light that doesn't reach your eyes.
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Frank Merton

Reflection, scattering, etc. You can't see light that doesn't reach your eyes.

You also can't see light that is of a wavelength your eyes don't detect.
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ChrLzs

There's a really good demonstration of this that you can view simply by going outside on a clear night, preferably away from city lights. Well, ok, you also have to pick a season and/or time of night where you can see the constellation of Sagittarius..

Look at it. Does it look dazzlingly bright? It dang well should, as you are now looking straight at the incredibly bright and star-laden CENTRE of our galaxy - the Milky Way. So why isn't it bright? Because of all the dust and matter in the intervening space...We *think* we know roughly how much, and what it is - but it is also 'dark matter' in its own way.... The thing is, mankind has only barely managed to get one (very old and hardly operational) space probe to beyond the edge of our solar system. So we have no true idea of exactly what is out there in intergalactic space - we haven't yet begun serious sampling much beyond our solar system, let alone out towards our nearest stellar neighbours, let alone beyond our galaxy....

This gives a bit of an impression of the problem... Imagine what Sagittarius would look like if all that obscuring dust wasn't there....

You_Are_Here_Milky_Way.jpg(from Helix..)

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Frank Merton

We and our neighbors are in a relatively dust free "balloon" in the galaxy. In times past and future there will be much more dust in our region.

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taniwha

I wonder if space is as dark as a closed box?

I wonder where the absolute darkest place in the universe can be found?

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ChrLzs

Taniwha, interestingly, the most strikingly obvious dark nebula is most easily seen down here in the Southern Hemisphere - it's called the Coalsack Nebula and is easily visible to the naked eye from a good location (no Moon, clear skies, away from city lights) right beside/in our beloved Southern Cross (Crux). It's a goal of mine to photograph it (probably using multiple exposures and 'stacking').

Here's a rather amazing image (hence the site name I guess) - clearly it's hard to be a dark nebula when they are so many flippin' stars...

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