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DARPA funds '4 minute mile' jetpack

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UM-Bot

Scientists have come up with a jetpack that can help soldiers to run faster on the battlefield.

A jetpack capable of enabling its wearer to fly has been a popular science fiction staple since as early as the 1920s. Real-life jetpacks would eventually turn up in the 1960s however the technology has generally enjoyed only limited use.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...te-mile-jetpack

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Taun

Why do I get a mental image of a soldier in full "battle rattle" zipping forward at great speed, only to do a Wiley Coyote against a tree?...

Also they mention "even while encumbered with large amounts of heavy equipment".... So they encumber them more with this heavy looking jet pack thingy... Might be fine

while the are 'jetting' along... but they've got to try and walk (and manuever) at slower speeds at some point...

Good idea, but I don't think this is going to work as is...

Edited by Taun
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Calibeliever

I don't think it's going to fly Orville.

I picture myself falling flat, face first, then being shoved along the ground at high speed.

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Talion78

Yep....how do you stay up....you get to the enemy and all that is left is your back and the jet pack.....with a big long smear heading off in the distance.

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pallidin

That had a video segment on this device on CBS This Morning today.

No-one fell down racing around the test track. Due, I presume, in large part to the fact that the device weighs 12lbs. and produces only 15lbs. of thrust.

The 2 designers said that the 2 electric fans spin at 60,000 rpm's each, and is VERY, VERY loud.

They also said that the battery is such that it is only currently useful for 4-minutes before requiring a recharge or battery switch-over.

They said that they are working to improve all 3 aspects; battery capacity/longevity, higher thrust, and much more quiet.

DARPA did not fund this, per-se. It was a DARPA challenge project, which means that you have to come-up with your own funds initially, then if DARPA is further interested, they will step-in with additional funding.

The 2 guys who invented this paid for the prototype themselves.

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pallidin

Oh, and it's NOT a "jetpack" anymore than a rotary blade plane is a "jet"

This device utilizes a purely fan-ducted propulsion system. 2 fans in this case.

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MyOtherAccount

I can see each person of a squad wearing one. Yet the squad still can't move forward quickly. If they did they would be shedding (abandoning) a guy every 100 feet as the packs stop working for this or that reason.

"Hold it guys my battery's dead. Now my strap has gone through the goferpack's fan blades. The fan blade cluster just flew off" (since it wasn't balanced any more.)

The goferpack might be good for a sniper team's deployment or a single-person-task, e.g. getting your officer a quick cuppa.

If your rifle jams, it doesn't stop the rest of your squad's weapons from working. But all the gofer packs have to work at the same time.

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George Ford

I can see each person of a squad wearing one. Yet the squad still can't move forward quickly. If they did they would be shedding (abandoning) a guy every 100 feet as the packs stop working for this or that reason.

"Hold it guys my battery's dead. Now my strap has gone through the goferpack's fan blades. The fan blade cluster just flew off" (since it wasn't balanced any more.)

The goferpack might be good for a sniper team's deployment or a single-person-task, e.g. getting your officer a quick cuppa.

If your rifle jams, it doesn't stop the rest of your squad's weapons from working. But all the gofer packs have to work at the same time.

Plus drones are probably just as cheap to manufacture and are one less human in harms way. With the leaps and bounds of ground based drones which are rapidly catching up with UAV's then soon war will be fought by young men using a joystick and a computer screen hundreds of miles away from any danger.

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u2canbfmj

we'll at least when the pentagon gets audited this time, they will know the wasted money went to ASU for passing wind assisted running

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Taun

Another thing about these that I don't particularly like, is that this is designed to make a soldier run faster so that he is harder to hit... Sounds good... But the closer you get to the enemy, the

less effective these would be... Because - outside of movies - you don't run up to the enemy, get in among them and start kung-fuing them or shooting them at point blank range... You and

your fire team rush up a dozen yards or so, plop down and begin firing so that the other fire team can advance... The momentum you carry forward from this thing is going to cause considerable

pain and even injury to the soldiers as they "hit the dirt" on a combat rush...., plus add its weight to their already heavy combat load, when they try to stand and make another rush....

I just don't see this as practical in combat - even if it gets to the point where it works as they envision...

Stealth, cover and concealment, effective use of terrain and well directed, accurate firepower are the keys to winning a tactical engagement... Speed is more important in the move to the

combat site, rather than in the site itself...

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regeneratia

Another thing about these that I don't particularly like, is that this is designed to make a soldier run faster so that he is harder to hit... Sounds good... But the closer you get to the enemy, the

less effective these would be... Because - outside of movies - you don't run up to the enemy, get in among them and start kung-fuing them or shooting them at point blank range... You and

your fire team rush up a dozen yards or so, plop down and begin firing so that the other fire team can advance... The momentum you carry forward from this thing is going to cause considerable

pain and even injury to the soldiers as they "hit the dirt" on a combat rush...., plus add its weight to their already heavy combat load, when they try to stand and make another rush....

I just don't see this as practical in combat - even if it gets to the point where it works as they envision...

Stealth, cover and concealment, effective use of terrain and well directed, accurate firepower are the keys to winning a tactical engagement... Speed is more important in the move to the

combat site, rather than in the site itself...

Just a few DARPA research to address your issues:

Hey, let this think for you.

http://www.eurekaler...u-cmr071603.php

Carnegie Mellon receives DARPA contract to develop personal cognitive assistant to aid busy managers

(I could just see my son as the hand-held controller of a soldier, since he LIVEs on those expensive Cyber machines, and it so agile with his hands and his avatar)

and

http://www.eurekaler...i-rra103105.php

Rensselaer researcher awarded DARPA funding to improve terrain maps

and

http://www.eurekaler...u-dcc110910.php

DARPA chooses Carnegie Mellon to develop autonomous capability for 'flying car'

Military ground vehicle would transform into flyer for scouting, resupply and medical evacuation

and

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-10/uoc--wmc103007.php

World's most complex silicon phased-array chip developed at UC-San Diego

Innovations in chip design may prompt new methods for high-speed wireless data transfer

“This compact beamforming chip will enable a breakthrough in size, weight, performance and cost in next-generation phased arrays for millimeter-wave military sensor and communication systems,” DARPA officials wrote in a statement.

NOw remember, don't get caught up in how they say all this will be used. Think about how it can be used, from beneficient to malovent.

Edited by regeneratia

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regeneratia

Tkae the first link I posted and put it all together. Just now, I am listening to Timothy Alberino, who was saying last night, what I am trying to put together for you now.

https://www.youtube....gp1Lk7K4rn6dtDA

http://www.eurekaler...l-dsl070814.php

DARPA selects Lawrence Livermore to develop world's first neural device to restore memory

Just browse the research from this site and add it together:

http://www.eurekaler...l-dsl070814.php

This accumulation of DARPA research is neither moral, upright nor honest.

Edited by regeneratia

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MyOtherAccount

http://www.eurekaler...l-dsl070814.php

DARPA selects Lawrence Livermore to develop world's first neural device to restore memory

This accumulation of DARPA research is neither moral, upright nor honest.

I have had TBI ever since 1966 and, sorry, but I am very encouraged by the above research and development plans. I had it before they knew what to call it. After they finish with that project, they can start in on assisting

  • the speech center
  • the brain damage that causes the ADA-like symptoms
  • the accompanying sleep disorders
  • the various types of aphasias (can't think of or perhaps pronounce the word I need)
  • the executive functions in the frontal lobe
  • the ruptured cochlear (damaged inner ear and messed up balance)
  • the olfactory bulb (sense of smell)
  • the truncal ataxia (messed up cerebelum causing dizziness and an awkward gate)
  • the depression episodes
  • the loss of tone of the diaphragm muscles because of damaged neurons
  • the loss of tone of the throat muscles because of damaged neurons
  • the loss of tone of the vocal cords causing speech that is quiet and slurred

All that will take care of moderate TBI and all my ailments that accompany it. Then they can start on the additional complications of severe TBI.

I hope it won't bother you that they do so, as I would really enjoy having all that brain functioning returned to me.

I think you would be singing a different song if you were the person needing help from TBI.

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regeneratia

I have had TBI ever since 1966 and, sorry, but I am very encouraged by the above research and development plans. I had it before they knew what to call it. After they finish with that project, they can start in on assisting

  • the speech center
  • the brain damage that causes the ADA-like symptoms
  • the accompanying sleep disorders
  • the various types of aphasias (can't think of or perhaps pronounce the word I need)
  • the executive functions in the frontal lobe
  • the ruptured cochlear (damaged inner ear and messed up balance)
  • the olfactory bulb (sense of smell)
  • the truncal ataxia (messed up cerebelum causing dizziness and an awkward gate)
  • the depression episodes
  • the loss of tone of the diaphragm muscles because of damaged neurons
  • the loss of tone of the throat muscles because of damaged neurons
  • the loss of tone of the vocal cords causing speech that is quiet and slurred

All that will take care of moderate TBI and all my ailments that accompany it. Then they can start on the additional complications of severe TBI.

I hope it won't bother you that they do so, as I would really enjoy having all that brain functioning returned to me.

I think you would be singing a different song if you were the person needing help from TBI.

Could you enlighten me as to what TBI is? Of course, I could look it up. (pause)

I think you better ask yourself just how much free will you want to have.

but oh, that frontal lobe is one I worship, complex cognitive functioning. It appears you have it, a functional frontal lobe.

Ok, OH honey, my heart is with you. Let me see what I can do, even if it is a fractional improvement. Send me your first name in message. Keep a hold of your privacy tho.

Edited by regeneratia

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6.6.6

This is completely ridiculous! Being able to run a 4 minute mile in a war zone?? Seriously??

Money should be spent on keeping personnel out of war zones not making them run faster through them!

How about we give our troops the best protection from explosions or bullets, no jet pack in the world can out run a .50 caliber or shrapnel from an IED, so how's about stop wasting time and money on crazy Tony Stark inventions and give military personnel some real protection from the dangers they face!

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trancelikestate

I honestly didnt watch the whole video so sorry if I missed something important but I did catch the guy at the end saying the runner was 3 seconds faster with the "jet pack" on. Hardly seems like 3 seconds is worth whatever these would cost...

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