Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

Washington 1952 UFO Incidents - Evidence?


ChrLzs
 Share

Recommended Posts

And I still await, ever patiently, Sky's choice of ONE SINGLE EVENT that is properly documented and evidenced, and clearly is only explainable by alien intelligence. Not holding my breath.

Perhaps, this might help. The Air Force released the radar images of a UFO near a B-52, Note the speed of the object. I have also reviewed the transcripts of the encounter.

ANALYSIS OF RADAR AND AIR-VISUAL UFO OBSERVATIONS

ON 24 OCTOBER 1968 AT MINOT AFB,

NORTH DAKOTA, USA

image043.gif

Figure 15. Echo of photo 772. Note that in three seconds the echo has changed its position 1.64 nm (3 km) and at an apparent speed of 3650 km / h (2268 mph).

image046.gif

Figure 16. Echo of photo 773.

Figures 15 a

image097.gif

Table 5. The column headings are as follows: 1. Photo. 2. Echo/Sol = ratio of the intensity of the UFO and ground echoes by assuming a linear radar and a linear photograph; 3. Dis Sol/Dis Echo = ratio of distances to the edge of the altitude hole / and UFO echo; 4. Effet Distance = ratio of distances to the fourth power; 5. Atten Angle = the attenuation that the angle Alpha must produce to get an echo as bright as in the photographs (second column divided by the fourth column); 6. Alpha = angle

http://www.minotb52u...ntroduction.php

Definitely not an aircraft, balloon nor a meteor. More on this encounter.

B-52/UFO Encounter Video

Edited by skyeagle409
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps, this might help. The Air Force released the radar images of a UFO near a B-52, Note the speed of the object. I have also reviewed the transcripts of the encounter.

Sky produces an interesting set of radar scope photos. Is this the definitive proof which CHrlz asks for? Again, it falls to the eye of the beholder. We have a series of scope photos showing something maneuvering at roughly 3000 mph, but then pacing the aircraft at speed for approximately 20 miles then disappearing off scope.

The issues concerning the scope photos:

1. Radar system was not checked out for possible operational issues after the aircraft returned to base.

2. No visual observation of the object by pilot and co-pilot, that is they do not see an object pacing the aircraft.

3. Ground observers are able to discern the aircraft, but do no see an object pacing the aircraft nor performing the high speed maneuvers as shown on the aircraft's radar scope.

So, the scope photos are interesting, but open to interpretation. How does this relate to Wash. DC 1952? I'm hoping that my response to Sky does not turn this thread into a Minot discussion, thus derailing CHrlz's effort or intent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[...] How does this relate to Wash. DC 1952? [...]

Exactly! But thats how Sky works...

Honestly, you, James, and Chrlzs (and other UMers) are trying to play chess with pigeon... You can bring solid arguments, but Sky will just crap all over the board with irrelevant info...

No offence, Sky, but that is true.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sky produces an interesting set of radar scope photos. Is this the definitive proof which CHrlz asks for? Again, it falls to the eye of the beholder. We have a series of scope photos showing something maneuvering at roughly 3000 mph, but then pacing the aircraft at speed for approximately 20 miles then disappearing off scope.

The issues concerning the scope photos:

1. Radar system was not checked out for possible operational issues after the aircraft returned to base.

2. No visual observation of the object by pilot and co-pilot, that is they do not see an object pacing the aircraft.

3. Ground observers are able to discern the aircraft, but do no see an object pacing the aircraft nor performing the high speed maneuvers as shown on the aircraft's radar scope.

So, the scope photos are interesting, but open to interpretation.

Hi Tim,

Perhaps, you should have read the report. There was nothing wrong with the radar.

radarscope-diagram.png

The B-52 radarscope consists of an illuminated bearing ring and 10-inch diameter tube face called a Plan Position Indicator (PPI). The chronometer, data plate, and counter to the right are superimposed via a separate optical path. The time on the twenty-four clock is 090617Z (4:06:17 CDT). Below it, the handwritten data plate identifies locations in the flight plan (Bismarck and St. George); the date (24 Oct. 68); aircraft identification (B-52H 012); radar system designation (ASQ-38); and names of the operators (Richey and McCaslin). The counter identifies the frame as #772. The B-52 is the bright spot in the center of the radarscope, on a heading of 122 degrees (0 degrees is north). The UFO echo appears at 242 degrees azimuth, 1.05 nautical miles (nmi) aft of the right wing of the B-52. The black circle in the center is the “TR hole” (transmit/receive) or “altitude hole,” and the white annulus extending five nmi out to the edge of the bearing ring is radar ground return. The diameter of the altitude hole decreases as the B-52 descends in altitude. There are three inner range rings visible within the altitude hole corresponding to .75, 1.25, and 1.75 nmi. The radial line at 284 degrees is the point where the next frame advances in the camera to begin another three-second time exposure, corresponding to the clockwise rotation of the radar antenna mounted beneath the nose of the B-52. The marker at 132 degrees is a manually adjusted azimuth marker.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Martin Shough, an experienced and critical radar analyst in Scotland, has studied the B-52 radarscope photographs. Martin has contributed an analysis to this report, entitled Anomalous Echoes Captured by a B-52 Airborne Radarscope Camera, with the goal of testing the internal consistency of the witness narratives and official records against the physical evidence, while seeking an explanation for the anomalous radar echoes. He considers many conventional interpretations of the echoes, concluding that none of the possibilities are convincing.

Building on Shough's foundation, Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES) French space agency scientist and astronomer Dr. Claude Poher has contributed a photometric study of the radarscope photos, entitled Analysis of Radar and Air-Visual UFO Observations on 24 October 1968 at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota, USA. Incorporating a multidisciplinary approach, Poher systematically formulates hypotheses leading to theoretical

considerations concerning the energetic potential of the UFO. He suggests, for instance, that if it were possible for the UFO to sustain the inferred accelerations for more than a dozen hours it could theoretically attain relativistic speeds approaching that of light, such that an interstellar voyage is possible

The B-52 Radarscope Photographs

While researching the case, we were fortunate to discover first-generation radarscope photographs filmed onboard the B-52 during the radar UFO encounter. Early in the morning on 24 October 1968, 5th Bombardment Wing intelligence officer Staff Sergeant Richard Clark arrived at work and was instructed to examine the original negative radarscope film. Clark requested two sets of 14 photographic prints from the larger sample, which clearly exhibit the UFO movement from front-right of the airborne B-52, as it appears to spiral around behind the aircraft to a position off the left wing. He included one set of the photos in his report and retained the other as a personal file-copy. Later, Clark passed the photographs along to his brother-in-law, fellow Minnesotan, William McNeff, who has generously contributed them for our analysis.

The 14 radarscope photographs present successive three-second, time-lapse exposures, corresponding to less than 40 seconds when the UFO echo was “painted” by the radar. The photos provide a quantifiable data set,which, among other things, allows us to determine the altitude and location of the B-52 in three dimensions at the precise time of the photograph. In addition, this allows for an extrapolation of the flight track of the B-52 in real-time, and comparison to the documentary timelines, while providing an additional means to inform the interpretation and narrative reconstruction of the events.

The B-52 radarscope consists of an illuminated bearing ring and 10-inch diameter tube face called a Plan Position Indicator (PPI). The chronometer, data plate, and counter to the right are superimposed via a separate optical path. The time on the twenty-four clock is 090617Z (4:06:17 CDT). Below it, the handwritten data plate identifies locations in the flight plan (Bismarck and St. George); the date (24 Oct. 68); aircraft identification (B-52H 012); radar system designation (ASQ-38); and names of the operators (Richey and McCaslin). The counter identifies the frame as #772. The B-52 is the bright spot in the center of the radarscope, on a heading of 122 degrees (0 degrees is north). The UFO echo appears at 242 degrees azimuth, 1.05 nautical miles (nmi) aft of the right wing of the B-52. The black circle in the center is the “TR hole” (transmit/receive) or “altitude hole,” and the white annulus extending five nmi out to the edge of the bearing ring is radar ground return. The diameter of the altitude hole decreases as the B-52 descends in altitude. There are three inner range rings visible within the altitude hole corresponding to .75, 1.25, and 1.75 nmi. The radial line at 284 degrees is the point where the next frame advances in the camera to begin another three-second time exposure, corresponding to the clockwise rotation of the radar antenna mounted beneath the nose of the B-52. The marker at 132 degrees is a manually adjusted azimuth marker.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

b52-crew.png

B-52 Aircraft Commander, pilot Capt. Don Cagle, Co-pilot Capt. Bradford Runyon, Radar Navigator Maj. Chuck Richey, Navigator Capt. Patrick McCaslin, Electronic Warfare Officer Capt. Thomas Goduto, and Gunner Tech/Sgt. Arlie Judd. All crewmembers were rated as instructors in their respective positions, establishing them as one of the top crews at Minot AFB in 1968.

To sum it up, there was nothing wrong with the radar.

Edited by skyeagle409
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How does this relate to Wash. DC 1952? I'm hoping that my response to Sky does not turn this thread into a Minot discussion, thus derailing CHrlz's effort or intent.

I was responding to his post when he asked:

Sky's choice of ONE SINGLE EVENT that is properly documented and evidenced,

Edited by skyeagle409
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sky, I very familiar with this case, so no need to carpet bomb this thread. After I post this reply, I will ignore any future responses based on common courtesy to the OP of this thread.

Read the entire case history, including all of the PBB data...the radar was never pulled from the aircraft and checked out...that is fact. So, we do not have any data to rule out possible anomalies...or not.

The visual observations do not support the radar data.

There is a thread that I started awhile back. That would be a good place to discuss Minot while keeping this thread pristine for the DC 1952 case.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly! But thats how Sky works...

Honestly, you, James, and Chrlzs (and other UMers) are trying to play chess with pigeon... You can bring solid arguments, but Sky will just crap all over the board with irrelevant info...

No offence, Sky, but that is true.

Not true at all. Please explain why my references were ignored. In case you are unaware of my references, let me represent them for you.

bgd3q1.jpg

Thanks!

I went to the library and pulled all kinds of publications that covered the Washington D.C. incidents, including LIFE magazine, August 4, 1952.

I also want to point out something in the article and it is as follows:

A traffic control center spokesman said the nature of the signals on the radar screen ruled out any possibility they were from clouds or any other "weather" disturbance. "The returns we received from the unidentified objects were similar and analagous to targets representing aircraft in flight," he said.

http://ufologie.net/...st28jul1952.htm

In addition:

http://greyfalcon.us...hingtonpost.jpg

http://greyfalcon.us...es/1952FIG2.gif

http://greyfalcon.us/pictures/Wash.jpg

Source:

http://greyfalcon.us/July%2028.htm

Then, we have;

http://www.amazon.co...734#reader-link

http://ufologie.net/htm/usa1952.htm

http://www.project19...m/fig/1952d.htm

1952FIG2.gif

http://greyfalcon.us/July%2028.htm

http://www.ufoeviden...ents/doc892.htm

http://en.wikipedia....C._UFO_incident

http://www.trivia-li...hington-d-c.htm

http://www.ufocasebo...gtondc1952.html

http://ufos.about.co...ashingtondc.htm

TIME Magazine - August 4, 1952

SCIENCE: Blips on the Scopes

Air traffic was light at Washington Airport one midnight last week, and the radar scope of the Civil Aeronautics Authority was almost clear. At 12:40 a.m. a group of bright blips showed. The operator estimated that they were about 15 miles southwest of Washington. Then the blips disappeared abruptly and reappeared a few seconds later over northeast Washington. The operator called his boss, Senior Controller Harry Barnes, 39, a graduate of the Buffalo Technical Institute who has worked for the CAA as an electronics expert since 1941. The operator told Barnes: "Here are some flying saucers for you."

Barnes laughed at first, but the blips kept popping up all over the scope. They sometimes hovered, sometimes flew slowly and sometimes incredibly fast. Technicians checked the radar; it was in good working order. Over the White House. Barnes began to worry when he saw the blips apparently flying over the White House and other prohibited areas. He called the airport control tower. Sure enough, its radar showed the strange blips too. When the towermen measured the speed of a fast blip, they found that it had flown for eight miles at 7,200 m.p.h.

http://www.project19...m/fig/1952a.htm

INVASION WASHINGTON

UFOs Over The Capital

http://www.amazon.co..._pt#reader-link

----------------------------------------------------------------

Codes:

AFOSI - Air Force Office of Special Investigations report, from Project Blue Book files, National Archives microfilm collection.

AF Int - Air Force Intelligence Report, most obtained by Citizens Against UFO Secrecy via the Freedom of Information Act, declassified Jan. 1985.

UFOE - The UFO Evidence, National Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomena, Washington, D.C., May 1964. (NICAP)

CAA - Civil Aeronautics Administration (later FAA, Federal Aviation Admin.)

ARTC - Air Route Traffic Control radar center approach-control radar, CAA.

(Note: Though Eastern Daylight Savings Time (EDT) was in effect during these sightings, AFOSI reports used Eastern Standard time. They have been converted to EDT here.)

July 14: 2012 EDT.

Newport News, Va. Southbound Pan American Airways plane at 8,000 ft. nearing the Norfolk, Va, area observed six glowing red, circular objects approaching below the airliner; objects flipped up on edge in unison and then sped from behind and under the airliner and joined the in-line formation, which "climbed in a graceful arc above the altitude of the airliner." "Then the lights blinked out one by one, though not in sequence." Next day the crew was thoroughly interrogated by AFOSI, and advised that they already had seven other reports of red discs moving at high speed and making sharp turns. (UFOE, p. 38-39.)

July 16: 2200 EDT.

Hampton Roads, Va. A Government aeronautical research engineer observed two amber-colored lights approaching from the south at about 500 m.p.h. These slowed and made a U-turn, revolved around each other at a high rate of speed, then joined by two other objects from different directions, the four sped off to the south at about 500 m.p.h. "They moved jerkily when moving slowly. Their ability to make tight circling turns was amazing." (UFOE, p. 57; Ruppelt , p. 210-211, gives time as 2100 hrs.)

July 18: 0200 EDT

Washington, D. C. Radio station chief engineer observed 6-7 bright orange discs moving in single file. Each in turn veered sharply upward and disappeared. (UFOE, p. 160; Associated Press story, July 19.)

July 19: 2340 EDT.

ARTC at National Airport began picking up unidentified targets on radar. (UFOE, p. 160; AFOSI; Ruppelt, p. 211)

July 20: 0100 EDT.

Herndon, Va. Capital Airlines flight from National Airport called by control tower to check on unidentified radar targets saw three objects, and three more between there and Martinsburg, W. Va. "like falling stars without tails [which] moved rapidly up, down, and horizontally. Also hovered." Chief CAA air traffic controller Harry Barnes later said in a newspaper interview: "His [the pilot's] subsequent description of the movement of the objects coincided with the position of our pips [radar targets] at all times while in our range." (UFOE, p. 159; AFOSI; CAA evaluation report on radar-UFO sightings.)

July 20: 0105 EDT.

Andrews AFB, Md. (Nr. Washington, D.C.). Five witnesses visually observed three reddish-orange objects moving erratically. (AFOSI.)

July 20: 0300 EDT.

Capital Airlines flight incoming to National Airport reported that an unidentified light followed his airliner from the vicinity of Herndon, Va., to within about 4 miles west of the airport, confirmed on ARTC radar. (AFOSI; UFOE, p.159.)

July 20: 0430-0630 EDT.

Additional unidentified targets on ARTC radar at National Airport. (AFOSI.)

July 20: mid-evening.

Air Force radar operators at Andrews AFB weather tower tracked 10 UFOs for 15-20 minutes. Objects approached runway, scattered, made sharp turns and reversals of direction. (UFOE, p.160, based on detailed report to NICAP from AF weather observer.)

July 26: 2115 EDT (to 0020 EDT July 27).

Sharp UFO targets on ARTC radar at National Airport. Civilian pilots saw glowing white objects on four occasions, including a United Airlines pilot near Herndon, Va., and two CAA pilots over Maryland. National Airlines pilot near Andrews AFB at 1700 ft. saw a UFO "flying directly over the airliner." (AFOSI; AF Int; UFOE, p. 159-162; Ruppelt, p. 218-221.)

July 26: 2130 EDT.

ARTC radar at National airport tracked a UFO on radar ("big target"), confirmed by Andrews AFB radar. (AF Int.)

July 26: 2150 EDT.

ARTC radar at National Airport tracked "solid returns" of "four targets in rough line abreast," and eight others scattered over the radar scope. (AF Int.)

July 26: 2154 EDT.

Andrews AFB, Md., surveillance radar tracked 10-12 UFOs in Washington, D.C. area. (AFOSI.)

July 26: 2157 EDT.

Wash. Natl [ ] 10-12 objs on radar (AFOSI)

July 26: 2215 EDT.

[*] From this time into following morning, "good sharp targets" of 4-8 UFOs on ARTC radar at National Airport. (AFOSI.)

July 26: 2238 EDT.

Air Force Command Post notified of unidentified radar targets. Two F-94 jet interceptors scrambled from New Castle AFB, Delaware, to investigate. (AF Int, AFOSI.)

July 26: 2304 EDT. 2323 EDT.

July 27: 0015 EDT.

Maj. Fournet (Project Blue Book Officer in Pentagon) and Lt. Holcomb (Navy electronics expert) arrived at National Airport ARTC Center. Observed "7 good, solid targets." Holcomb checked on temperature inversions, but they were minor and could not explain what was going on. He so advised AF Command Post, requesting interception mission. By the time the F-94 jets arrived from Delaware, no strong unidentified targets remained and no visual contacts were made. (AF Int.)

July 27: 0020 EDT.

[*] F-94 jet interceptors scrambled from New Castle AFB, Del., to investigate Washington, D.C., radar- UFOs. One F-94 pilot made visual contact and appeared to be gaining on target; both F-94 and UFO were observed on radar and "appeared to be travelling at the same approximate speed." When the F-94 pilot tried to overtake the UFO, it disappeared visually and on radar. The pilot remarked about the "incredible speed of the object." (AFOSI.)

July 27: 1930 EDT.

Air Force Lieutenant at Andrews AFB saw a dark disc moving slowly northeast with "oscillating rolling motion." Clouds were moving southeast. UFO entered base of clouds. (UFOE, p. 161, from CAA report.)

July 27: 2100 EDT.

Air Force personnel and others at National Airport saw a large round object reflecting sunlight, apparently hovering over the Capital Building. After about a minute, the object "wavered then shot straight up disappearing from sight." (AF Int.)

July 28:

Daily papers headlined a United Press story from Washington, D.C., that the Air Defence Command had ordered its jet pilots to pursue, and if necessary "shoot down, " UFOs sighted anywhere in the country.

July 29: 0130-0500 EDT.

Many unidentified targets tracked by CAA radar, 8-12 on the radarscope at a time, moving southeast in a belt 15 miles wide near Washington, D.C. (CAA report.)

July 29: 0300 EDT.

Eastern Airlines pilot asked to check on ARTC radar targets, reported seeing nothing. CAA official said the targets disappeared from the radar screen when the plane was in their area, "then came back in behind him." (UFOE, p.162)

July 29: 1500 EDT.

Air Force pilot sighted three round white UFOs 10 miles southeast of Andrews AFB. Other UFOs tracked by ARTC radar during the afternoon. (CAA report.)

---------------------------------------------------------------------

1952 Washington D.C. UFO

"Every man in here knows temperature inversion effects," said Barnes. "When an inversion is big enough, it picks up all sorts of 'ground clutter' - water tanks, buildings, bridges, shore lines and so on. But anybody can recognize it - you'll see huge purplish blobs, but nothing like those blips we tracked. And in the six years I've watched these scopes, absolutely nothing - high speed jets, storms. inversions, or anything else - has ever caused echoes that maneuvered like that, and we have had identical weather conditions many times."

Every controller and technician backed him up.

"Besides that," Chief Engineer J. L. McGivern told me, "there was no ground clutter either time, except the big blotch we always have at the center of the scope, where the bottom of the beam picks up the airport buildings."

Art the Weather Bureau, I found the same answer. Vaughn D. Rockne, senior radar specialist. who is familiar with inversion effects, had never seen or heard of such blips as were tracked on the two nights in question.

Dr. John Hagin. the leading radio astronomer at the Naval Research Laboratory went even further.

"Even with an extreme inversion," Dr. Hagin told me, "conditions would have to be very, very unusual to cause such effects. In my opinion, the pinpointing of blips by three radar stations, and simultaneous sighting of lights at the same points, would make it impossible."

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Captain Pierman, flying a Capital airliner, had just taken off from Washington. In a few moments he radioed back that he saw a bright light where the scope showed one of the objects. At the very instant he called the Center, the object raced off at terrific speed.

"It was almost as if whatever controlled it had heard us, or had seen Pierman head toward it," said Barnes. "He said it vanished from sight in three to five seconds. But here's the important point: at that very moment, the blip disappeared from the scope.

"That means it must have raced out of our beam between ten second sweeps. It could have done this in one of two ways: First, it could make a steep climb at terrific speed, so that in ten seconds it would be above the vertical area swept by our M.E.W. set. [The beam's average altitude, at its highest point, is from 35,000 to 40,000 feet, far out, but it is much less near the airport. At 30 miles, it is about 8,500 feet, sloping to 1,200 at three miles.] Second, it could race horizontally off our 34 mile scope within ten seconds."

Considering the objects' relative position, just before they vanished, this last would require a speed of from 5,000 to 7,000 m.p.h. At the time, this seemed unbelievable to Barnes and the other controllers. But Captain Pierman later confirmed the objects' tremendous speed.

Edited by skyeagle409
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly! But thats how Sky works...

Honestly, you, James, and Chrlzs (and other UMers) are trying to play chess with pigeon... You can bring solid arguments, but Sky will just crap all over the board with irrelevant info...

No offence, Sky, but that is true.

Continue:

Al Chop

Al Chop describes being present at Washington National Airport on the night in July 1952 watching on radar and hearing the communications when an Air Force F-94 pilot reported being surrounded by UFOs. He quotes the pilot as saying, "They're closing in on me! What shall I do?" Chop: "There was dead silence in the radar room; no one knew what to say. I don't mind telling you this, it scared me! It was frightening! And I think everybody in the room was very apprehensive.

They had to be intelligently controlled." His experience that night convinced him that UFOs probably were from another planet.

Al Chop; Press Chief for the U.S. Air Force in 1952

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Conclusion UFOs Are Space Ships

Given SAC in 1952

A 1952 evaluation of "flying saucers" as interplanetary devices, sent to Strategic Air Command Headquarters from MacDill AFB, has been disclosed to NICAP by former information Specialist Don Widener, one of the AF men concurring in this opinion.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

AIR FORCE TIMES

August 2, 1952

F-94s Called Out To Chase

Saucers Over Washington

WASHINGTON. -- The status of the flying saucer following radar sightings over Washington and a Pentagon "saucer" conference this week is just where it was previously -- all up in the air.

Comments of high-ranking Air Force intelligence and "saucer project" officers are on the intangible side, as befits talk about phenomena on which the Air Force says no scientifically useful observations have been made.

In an effort to settle one rumor which declares that the "limitless" power which would be required for saucer propulsion could be obtained from a nuclear power plant generating electricity, The TIMES stated the theory to Maj. Gen. John A. Samford, Air Force director of intelligence.

"That's a pretty strong idea, but wait until it gets a little further along," he replied. Quizzed as to his meaning, he said that the idea is "mentally implausible."

Washington has had a flurry of sightings of unidentified objects. Around midnight on July 19 the Air Route Traffic Control Center (CAA) at Washington National Airport sighted from seven to 10 unidentified aerial objects. The radar operators said that eight were picked up in the vicinity of Andrews AFB, Md., moving at from 100 to 120 mph.

The control center notified the Air Force and also asked planes in the air if they could see anything.

Capt. S.C. Pierman, piloting Capital Airlines Flight 807, southbound from National Airport, soon reported seeing seven objects between Washington and Martinsburg, W. Va. He said they changed pace, sometimes moving at tremendous speed, at other times hanging almost motionless. He described them as "like falling stars without tails", and added:

"In all my years of flying I've seen a lot of falling or shooting stars, but these were much faster. They couldn't have been aircraft. They were moving too fast for that. They were about the same size as the brighter stars, and were much higher than our 6000 ft altitude."

Another airliner, Capital National airlines flight 610, also reported seeing a light and following it from Herndon, Va., to within four miles of Washington.

The Air Force did not send up interceptor planes that night because its own radar had not picked up the images and because the round-the-clock observer operation had not sent out warnings, officers said.

The night of July 26 at 9:08 unidentified objects were picked up by radar at National Airport. At various times four to 12 in number, the objects were seen on the radar screen until 3 a.m. Radar at Andrews AFB showed the objects from around 8:30 until midnight, and located them at approximately seven miles south of the base.

At 11:25 p.m., two F-94s from the Air Defense Command at New Castle AFB, Del., took off to investigate. One of the F-94 pilots saw four lights near Andrews, but he could not overtake them and they disappeared in two or three minutes. He also saw a steady white light 10 miles east of Mount Vernon but it faded quickly.

At 1:40 a.m., two more F-94s took off and patrolled the area until 2:20 a.m., but they saw nothing suspicious.

It is clear and straight-to-the-point that the UFOs were not ordinary aircraft.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Again and again and again. Its boring.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly! But thats how Sky works...

Honestly, you, James, and Chrlzs (and other UMers) are trying to play chess with pigeon... You can bring solid arguments, but Sky will just crap all over the board with irrelevant info...

No offence, Sky, but that is true.

Continue:

1952 Washington D.C. UFO Radar Information

Flashing word to Air Defense, Barnes turned back to the scope. The unknown visitors had separated, were now over Washington, two near the White House, one close to the Capitol.

A few minutes later, the controllers bending over the scope got a new jolt. One blip track showed an abrupt 90- degree turn, something no plane could do. As the sweep came around, another of the strange objects suddenly reversed, its new blip "blossoming" on top of the one it bad previously made. The unknown craft, or whatever it was, had stopped dead from over 100 m.p.h., then completely reversed direction - all in about five seconds.

"Then we noticed another strange thing," Barnes told me later. "Some blips suddenly disappeared, between sweeps. I couldn't explain, until Jim Ritchey called 'Casey' Pierman to check on onegroup of the things."

Captain Pierman, flying a Capital airliner, had just taken off from Washington. In a few moments he radioed back that he saw a bright light where the scope showed one of the objects. At the very instant he called the Center, the object raced off at terrific speed.

"It was almost as if whatever controlled it had heard us, or had seen Pierman head toward it," said Barnes. "He said it vanished from sight in three to five seconds. But here's the important point: at that very moment, the blip disappeared from the scope.

"That means it must have raced out of our beam between ten second sweeps. It could have done this in one of two ways: First, it could make a steep climb at terrific speed, so that in ten seconds it would be above the vertical area swept by our M.E.W. set. [The beam's average altitude, at its highest point, is from 35,000 to 40,000 feet, far out, but it is much less near the airport. At 30 miles, it is about 8,500 feet, sloping to 1,200 at three miles.] Second, it could race horizontally off our 34 mile scope within ten seconds."

Considering the objects' relative position, just before they vanished, this last would require a speed of from 5,000 to 7,000 m.p.h. At the time, this seemed unbelievable to Barnes and the other controllers. But Captain Pierman later confirmed the objects' tremendous speed.

"They'd go up and down at terrific speed, or streak off and disappear. Between Washington and Martinsburg, we saw six of these fast moving lights. [Control Center showed them at the same position.] I don't know what they were, but they weren't shooting stars."

Another confirmation of the visitors' incredible speed came later that night, from the Washington tower. Operator Joe Zacko had been watching the A.S.R. scope when one of the mystery objects abruptly appeared just west of Andrews Field. Unlike the slower M.E.W., the A.S.R., with its 28-r.p.m. antenna, can track extremely high speeds. As Zacko watched, fascinated, the blips made a bright streak or trail, heading north- northeast toward Riverdale. Then the trail ended as swiftly as it had come.

Howard Cocklin, hastily called over by Zacko, also saw the bright trail. Together they figured the object's speed from its trace. It had been making two miles per second -7,200 m.p.h.

"It was as if it had descended rapidly, almost vertically," Cocklin told me later. "That would bring it suddenly into the A.S.R. beam area. It seemed to level off for those few seconds, and then abruptly ascend out of the beam again."

Barnes and his men saw another significant maneuver that night. When they vectored a pilot toward one of the lighted objects, the strange blip disappeared. Then in a few seconds it reappeared behind the plane. Barnes commented, "If it was the same one - and I think it was - that was another of those high speed vanishing acts between sweeps."

(The same maneuver was reported from Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, on July 29. On this occasion a mysterious disk sighted by numerous ground observers - was seen to whip around at terrific speed behind jet planes sent up to intercept it.)

http://www.nicap.org/whatradar.htm

Now, do you have any questions?

Again and again and again. Its boring.

Some people just don't get it the first time around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sky, I very familiar with this case, so no need to carpet bomb this thread. After I post this reply, I will ignore any future responses based on common courtesy to the OP of this thread.

Read the entire case history, including all of the PBB data...the radar was never pulled from the aircraft and checked out...that is fact. So, we do not have any data to rule out possible anomalies...or not.

The visual observations do not support the radar data.

There is a thread that I started awhile back. That would be a good place to discuss Minot while keeping this thread pristine for the DC 1952 case.

Perhaps, you can bring that to the attention of the folks at Minot AFB.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That would be a good place to discuss Minot while keeping this thread pristine for the DC 1952 case.

Hi Tim,

We can continue here.

520804Life_cover.jpg

WASHINGTON'S BLIPS

'Somethings' over the capital are traced on radar

The most startling "flying saucer" incidents recently reported have taken place during the past two weeks over Washington, D.C. and threaten to make politics take a back seat in the most political of American cities. There, for the first time, mysterious objects in the sky were recorded by ground observers, by pilots in airplanes and on radar screens all at the same time. And, for the first known time, the U.S. Air Force sent its jet planes up in an attempt to intercept the objects.

The incidents began on Sunday July 20.

http://www.nicap.org/articles/520804Life.pdf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some people just don't get it the first time around.

But thats no reason to spread the whole stuff again and including double and dead links.

If you feel forced to repeat yr whole data base for pages and pages, a link to the initial post

is sufficient enough and more comfortable for the ppl who are not interested to scroll through

these walls of text.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sky, I do appreciate wall of text/links, but Chrlzs was very specific - ONE SINGLE EVENT that is properly documented and evidenced, and clearly is only explainable by alien intelligence. Key moment - ONE SINGLE EVENT, not the wave spread all over the week+.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sky, I do appreciate wall of text/links, but Chrlzs was very specific - ONE SINGLE EVENT that is properly documented and evidenced, and clearly is only explainable by alien intelligence. Key moment - ONE SINGLE EVENT, not the wave spread all over the week+.

The 1952 Washington D.C. UFO incidents were well documented.

true4.jpg

From a controller's original sketch, some saucer movements July 20

on Washington radar scope are diagrammed above. At A, seven blips

appeared suddenly. Two moved ( near White House, one near Capitol.

At C, one fled a northwest bound airliner (indicated by row of blips).

Later (D) ten flocked at Andrews Field. E illustrates a saucer's right-

angle turn compared with curving turn of ordinary aircraft."

What aircraft can mimic the maneuver of the UFO at "E" ?

1952 Washington D.C. UFO Incidents: Life Magazine, August 4, 1952

Blips again

Then, the following Saturday night, the blips began all over again. At 9:08 they appeared on the CAA radar screens where the others had been noticed almost a week before. There were five or six of them moving in a southerly direction. Harry Barnes again called both airport traffic tower and Andrews Field to see if their radar showed the blips. They did.

After tracking the blips for a half hour, Barnes began radioing airliners. United Airlines Flight 640 radioed: "I see a very dim light."

Barnes radioed back: "You are now where three blips are."

"One's here," radioed 640. "We got him in sight. He's real real pretty."

At that instant, Andrews (AFB) reported to Barnes that they had seen three strange lights streaking across the sky.

Clearly, the maneuvering UFOs were not aircraft.

Edited by skyeagle409
Link to comment
Share on other sites

But thats no reason to spread the whole stuff again and including double and dead links.

If you feel forced to repeat yr whole data base for pages and pages, a link to the initial post

is sufficient enough and more comfortable for the ppl who are not interested to scroll through

these walls of text.

But , some folks have not seen the references I have posted earlier and it is clear that the UFOs were not ordinary aircraft nor weather balloons. The Air Force is not in the business of intercepting weather balloons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But , some folks have not seen the references I have posted earlier and it is clear that the UFOs were not ordinary aircraft

nor weather balloons. The Air Force is not in the business of intercepting weather balloons.

This response has nothing to do with my comment, so why do you responded?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But thats no reason to spread the whole stuff again and including double and dead links.

If you feel forced to repeat yr whole data base for pages and pages, a link to the initial post

is sufficient enough and more comfortable for the ppl who are not interested to scroll through

these walls of text.

Then, I will make it simple. Prove that the UFOs were anything but intelligently-controlled flying objects. You have the specifics of the incidents.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 1952 Washington D.C. UFO incidents were well documented.

What aircraft can mimic the maneuver of the UFO at "E" ?

OK, thats the start, July 20, 1952, take a note Sky, July 20, 1952. OK, lets collect data on July 20, 1952 <hour> +/- 12 hours. Later we will narrow down the time span to 1 hour (and less). What we will get?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This response has nothing to do with my comment, so why do you responded?

Seriously? You do realize what swamp you are in..?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Then, I will make it simple. Prove that the UFOs were anything but intelligently-controlled flying objects. You have the specifics

of the incidents.

Also his response has nothing to do with my comment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, thats the start, July 20, 1952, take a note Sky, July 20, 1952. OK, lets collect data on July 20, 1952 <hour> +/- 12 hours. Later we will narrow down the time span to 1 hour (and less). What we will get?

First of all, you have to understand that the 1952 Washington D.C. UFO incidents were known as radar/visual cases. In other words, radar contacts were confirmed visually by pilots and ground-based observers and radar controllers and pilots confirmed the UFOs were not the result of natural phenomena. The characteristics of the UFOs were indicative of intelligently-controlled aerial objects .

One type of radar involved was a parabolic antenna, rotating six times per minute, which transmits a narrow radio beam which swings around the horizon. When the beam strikes a plane, an "echo" or "return" is reflected back. Amplified. this appears as a small spot or "blip" on the face of a cathode ray scope. As the echo comes back from a cruising airliner, a small round violet blip appears on the scope. At that spot, the phosphor coating of the glass maintains a diminishing glow. Every ten seconds, a new blip appears. showing the plane's changed position. The glass retains seven blips before the first one fades out. From the position of the blips and the space between them, the plane's course and speed call be seen at a glance, also its location, distance and compass bearing. Very-high-frequency radar sets can pick up even cobwebs or clouds of nearby insects. But these do not appear on the M.E.W. scope, nor would their echoes resemble the clear, sharp blip of a plane. Radar can detect even detect birds.

On the night of July 20, none of these things were involved, as an Air Force check has proved. The scope was clear of any strange objects until 12:40. At that moment, seven round blips, like those of planes. suddenly appeared in the southwest quadrant. Since no group of planes - military or civilian -was due to arrive, the Control Center men were immediately concerned.

Barnes quickly checked the consoles; both scopes showed the strange blips. He called in radar technicians; they found no flaw in the set or antenna. In other words, there was nothing wrong with the radar units.To handle local traffic, the tower has a separate set, an A.S.R. (Airport Surveillance Radar) with a 30 mile range. Radar at National Airport and Andrews AFB, were speaking to one another on the same page. Air Force radar operators at Andrews Air Force Base uses an A.S.R. set.

The terrific speeds of the UFOs were recorded and some objects were tracked at between 5,000 to 7,000 m.p.h. and in some cases, the velocity of the UFOs radar on radar were confirmed by pilots in the sky. In other words, radar contacts were confirmed by pilot observations in the area. Radar controllers have confirmed the UFOs were not the result of natural phenomena, which was supported by an Air Force study in 1969, in effect, debunking its own temperature inversion explanation in 1952.

Also his response has nothing to do with my comment.

In other words, you are not up to the task to do so.

.

Edited by skyeagle409
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sky may be overly verbose, at times, yes, but besides that, in this case here - UFO's over DC, 1952, Sky's got the goods, IMO. And that is what really counts (to me).

You have ATC's - military and civilian, claiming the many high speed blips appearing on their screens in four separate incidents, and you have visuals by pilots corroborating the ATC accounts. There also existed eye witnesses on the ground, which also backed up what the radar images showed - fast flying UFO's over Washington DC. And local press media covered all the events as well. Most compelling to me was a jet pilot asking the ATC for advice as the UFO's closed in on his jet, and admittance from a high ranking Air Force officer of his distressful emotional reaction to exactly that event.

Also, as Sky has pointed out, the USAF does not scramble jets for weather balloons, tethering balloons, swamp gas or weather inversions. The USAF will scramble jets when it appears that the White House, which is home to the Commander in Chief of the American Armed Forces, appears to be in danger.

Yah.

It may be argued as to exactly *what* those crafts were but it cannot be denied, IMO, that they existed.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First of all, you have to understand that the 1952 Washington D.C. UFO incidents were known as radar/visual cases. In other words, radar contacts were confirmed visually by pilots and ground-based observers and radar controllers and pilots confirmed the UFOs were not the result of natural phenomena. The characteristics of the UFOs were indicative of intelligently-controlled aerial objects .

One type of radar involved was a parabolic antenna, rotating six times per minute, which transmits a narrow radio beam which swings around the horizon. When the beam strikes a plane, an "echo" or "return" is reflected back. Amplified. this appears as a small spot or "blip" on the face of a cathode ray scope. As the echo comes back from a cruising airliner, a small round violet blip appears on the scope. At that spot, the phosphor coating of the glass maintains a diminishing glow. Every ten seconds, a new blip appears. showing the plane's changed position. The glass retains seven blips before the first one fades out. From the position of the blips and the space between them, the plane's course and speed call be seen at a glance, also its location, distance and compass bearing. Very-high-frequency radar sets can pick up even cobwebs or clouds of nearby insects. But these do not appear on the M.E.W. scope, nor would their echoes resemble the clear, sharp blip of a plane. Radar can detect even detect birds.

On the night of July 20, none of these things were involved, as an Air Force check has proved. The scope was clear of any strange objects until 12:40. At that moment, seven round blips, like those of planes. suddenly appeared in the southwest quadrant. Since no group of planes - military or civilian -was due to arrive, the Control Center men were immediately concerned.

Barnes quickly checked the consoles; both scopes showed the strange blips. He called in radar technicians; they found no flaw in the set or antenna. In other words, there was nothing wrong with the radar units.To handle local traffic, the tower has a separate set, an A.S.R. (Airport Surveillance Radar) with a 30 mile range. Radar at National Airport and Andrews AFB, were speaking to one another on the same page. Air Force radar operators at Andrews Air Force Base uses an A.S.R. set.

The terrific speeds of the UFOs were recorded and some objects were tracked at between 5,000 to 7,000 m.p.h. and in some cases, the velocity of the UFOs radar on radar were confirmed by pilots in the sky. In other words, radar contacts were confirmed by pilot observations in the area. Radar controllers have confirmed the UFOs were not the result of natural phenomena, which was supported by an Air Force study in 1969, in effect, debunking its own temperature inversion explanation in 1952.

OK, impressive. Put it in the drawers, so to speak:

1) radar data;

2) eyewitness data.

Just two simple data sets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sky may be overly verbose, at times, yes, but besides that, in this case here - UFO's over DC, 1952, Sky's got the goods, IMO. And that is what really counts (to me).

You have ATC's - military and civilian, claiming the many high speed blips appearing on their screens in four separate incidents, and you have visuals by pilots corroborating the ATC accounts. There also existed eye witnesses on the ground, which also backed up what the radar images showed - fast flying UFO's over Washington DC. And local press media covered all the events as well. Most compelling to me was a jet pilot asking the ATC for advice as the UFO's closed in on his jet, and admittance from a high ranking Air Force officer of his distressful emotional reaction to exactly that event.

Also, as Sky has pointed out, the USAF does not scramble jets for weather balloons, tethering balloons, swamp gas or weather inversions. The USAF will scramble jets when it appears that the White House, which is home to the Commander in Chief of the American Armed Forces, appears to be in danger.

Yah.

It may be argued as to exactly *what* those crafts were but it cannot be denied, IMO, that they existed.

Whatever you smoke... don't...

Blue font just stupid.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.