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Dalai Lama may be the last

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quiXilver

I'm assuming HH The Dalai Lama is referring to a false successor being named as his replacement, a "plant" if you will, likely by the Chinese government. This "plant" would likely have no knowledge of Tibetan Buddhism, their tradition or history, and would likely be nothing more than a tool and puppet of the state who will seek to further erode Tibetan culture.

On another note, am I the only one that is bothered by all of this? It disturbs me that such a beautiful religion, culture and tradition is on the brink of disappearing. I think adherents of any and all religions should be deeply disturbed by the cultural genocide that has taken place there. We should be doing all that we can to prevent this from happening. If Tenzin Gyatso is the last of the Dalai Lamas, then the world will have lost a beautiful light, and I cannot help but think we will be in part to blame for not trying to do more for the Tibetan cause.

I feel the sorrow of this deeply.

What is happening in Tibet is a carbon copy of what happened in America with manifest destiny and in any of the Colonies of the Dutch, Brits... etc etc

It's systematic geno=culturecide. One of humanities particularly f#cked traits.

It causes nausea in me every time it comes up.

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aniknonymous

@quiXilver i agree. i am not a spiritual person at all but it makes me sad when this things happen...i think that dalai lama is a lot smarter than many people believe and to make such a statement he must know what is going to happen if things go as the chinese government wants.

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Beany

I think the Tibetan Buddhists have known for years that they would not be able to continue their traditions in Tibet. I know they've moved at least one important temple to Colorado, and think they have at least a couple of others somewhere in the US. Rather than resist these changes, they've planned for them. The Native American holy men also knew that their traditional way of life would disappear or go underground with the coming of European settlers. While I love tradition, the beauty of it, the history and forces that drive it, it may be that in order for a tradition to be meaningful it must change in order to be culturally meaningful, and in fact, to even reach a larger audience. It's very cool that the Dalai Lama isn't clinging to the past, but instead is looking forward to the future.

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DieChecker

Isn't the goal of Buddhism to get out of being reincarnated? If a true good man like the Dalai Lama has to reincarnate, then what chance would any of us have?

I think it is pretty arrogant actually to not want to reincarnate just because you might come back stupid. Isn't the thinking that if you do reincarnate back into a person who is handycapped, or has a genetic/birth defect, that you did something wrong in your previous life? What is Mr Dalai afraid of??

Edited by DieChecker

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magnum mysterium

I've always had a problem with the reward/punishment bit of Buddhism and Hinduism, especially after my saintly mom died of cancer. The collective connotation of reincarnation is no different from "prosperity gospel" (prosperity theology). Alas, it's manipulative, dangerous, and beneath any rational-thinking human beings. On the other hand, many people delight in beautiful lies, but unfortunately, they bite back with a vengeance, in more ways than one. Being stigmatized is one. The Caste System is two.

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pallidin

Kind-of sounds like he wants to be the FINAL word on that religion or philosophy.

Hmmm... where have I seen this before...

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White Crane Feather

Have you seen the movie The Little Buddha - it explores a similar possibility, not for the Dalai Lama position but a reincarnating buddhist monk just the same.

I think I may have seen It a long time ago, but I don't remember anything about it. Hmmmmmm you may be showing your age. Now that I'm thinking ...little tiny images are coming back to me... But that was a damn long time ago.

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libstaK

I think I may have seen It a long time ago, but I don't remember anything about it. Hmmmmmm you may be showing your age. Now that I'm thinking ...little tiny images are coming back to me... But that was a damn long time ago.

Lol, it's only from 1993 here is the trailer:

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White Crane Feather

Lol, it's only from 1993 here is the trailer:

Yup.... that was it. Somehow a young Kiano reeves makes me laugh when I see him portraying sidartha. I don't know why I was giggling just now but it's funny how movies from even just 20 years ago seem sort of off beat. it's funny to go back and see the actors/actresses back then sometimes before they really are even famous. I was shocked one day to discover that Jim Carey was in a Dirty Harry movie and that he was the protagonist in an old comedy called Once Bitten. I remember seeing the movie, but I never remembered him. To me Jim Carey will always be fire martial Bill, and Kiano will ways be Neo. acters probably hate guys like me. Merry Christmas my friend.

Edited by White Crane Feather
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White Crane Feather

Kind-of sounds like he wants to be the FINAL word on that religion or philosophy.

Hmmm... where have I seen this before...

It is possible that he dosnt beleive in the tenants of his religion but graciously accepts that everyone else does. He has always had a very strong interest in science and even consults with scientists. Even though he was born into the position, it seems he has filled it very well.

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libstaK

Yup.... that was it. Somehow a young Kiano reeves makes me laugh when I see him portraying sidartha. I don't know why I was giggling just now but it's funny how movies from even just 20 years ago seem sort of off beat. it's funny to go back and see the actors/actresses back then sometimes before they really are even famous. I was shocked one day to discover that Jim Carey was in a Dirty Harry movie and that he was the protagonist in an old comedy called Once Bitten. I remember seeing the movie, but I never remembered him. To me Jim Carey will always be fire martial Bill, and Kiano will ways be Neo. acters probably hate guys like me. Merry Christmas my friend.

I actually didn't see the Little Buddha until after I had seen the Matrix - so yeh, I get the laughter, I laughed myself silly every time he was on the screen, that fake tan was so over done and his "Indian accent" was so bad, it was hysterical. Nonetheless I loved the movie, in fact that might have been part of why.

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White Crane Feather

I actually didn't see the Little Buddha until after I had seen the Matrix - so yeh, I get the laughter, I laughed myself silly every time he was on the screen, that fake tan was so over done and his "Indian accent" was so bad, it was hysterical. Nonetheless I loved the movie, in fact that might have been part of why.

Haveing a minor in humanities centered on transposition of literature to film probably makes me think way to much about it, but the human story is based in archetypes and speaks to many of the identities that we construct for ourselves. Eventhough it was a minor interest hence the minor academic study, I find I'm becoming more and more interested in how our pop culture integrates with archatypical imagry. It's very revealing.

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magnum mysterium

Kind-of sounds like he wants to be the FINAL word on that religion or philosophy.

Hmmm... where have I seen this before...

Spoken like a true (cagey) politician, the Dalai Lama declared during a BBC interview: "That depends on the circumstances." So, it ain't over, until it's over, right?? But alas, here's his closing statement: "The century old tradition, cease, at the time of the quiet, popular Dalai Lama -- ha, ha, ha, ha, ha."

It's a win-win situation -- he got a free plug. He's being talked about, again. It's also a good way of "saving face," just in case he doesn't get Tibet back during his current incarnation.

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Frank Merton

It is possible that he dosnt beleive in the tenants of his religion but graciously accepts that everyone else does. He has always had a very strong interest in science and even consults with scientists. Even though he was born into the position, it seems he has filled it very well.

Maybe he doesn't "believe" anything, but I suspect he thinks that most of what he stands for is pretty close to truth. That is one of the foundations of happiness -- don't "believe" and question everything, so that one does not suffer guilt when one doubts but can accept doubts happily.
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third_eye

And a few more immolating monks to usher in the New Year ...

~

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White Crane Feather

Maybe he doesn't "believe" anything, but I suspect he thinks that most of what he stands for is pretty close to truth. That is one of the foundations of happiness -- don't "believe" and question everything, so that one does not suffer guilt when one doubts but can accept doubts happily.

But what happens to Buddhism if they eliminate this tradition? I don't want to see it go. Now I'm interested in the behaviour of last Dali Lamas. Any sources you can recommend?

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Beany

But what happens to Buddhism if they eliminate this tradition? I don't want to see it go. Now I'm interested in the behaviour of last Dali Lamas. Any sources you can recommend?

I don't think tradition will be totally eliminated, I'm guessing it will morph or change in a way that better supports modern practitioners living in current time. Which I think would be very cool. Jettison the dogma and find ways to support people struggling with the current issues found in today's modern society.

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third_eye

Philosophy is not a Luxury by Jeff Carreira. The philosophical ideas discussed in this book mainly belong to the classical American philosophers Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, and John Dewey. These three minds were the originators of the philosophy called pragmatism, which remains to this day America’s most significant contribution to world philosophy.

The essays represent a general progression of thought, each building upon the last. They are suggested to be read as complete in themselves in order to see what questions and avenues for further inquiry they open up for you. Each essay is a snapshot, a glimpse into an extraordinary perspective on reality. They are seeds for
, starting points for your own inquiry.

Jeff Carreira is the director of education at the nonprofit organization EnlightenNext. In that position he creates and organizes a global network of spiritual and philosophical education programs. Download his book here (52 pages/6.6 MB):

  • Holybooks free pdf link

The Buddha – The Social-Revolutionary Potential of Buddhism is written by Trevor Oswald Ling. He was born in England in 1920 and during The Second World War he went to India to become a Baptist clergyman. Instead he became a student of Sanskrit, Pali and Classical Indian Literature and he had a distinguished academic career in India and England. This book was written with the intention to shake its readers into awareness of the social-revolutionary potential of Buddhism. It has two major themes. Firstly it argues that the Buddha’s message is intrinsically social, political and progressive. Secondly it implies that the message of the Buddha despite of the age, it offers us a workable guidance towards the future. Download the book here:

  • Holybooks free pdf link

~

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DieChecker

Haveing a minor in humanities centered on transposition of literature to film probably makes me think way to much about it,

So you probably had a field day with The Hobbit movies??

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Frank Merton

But what happens to Buddhism if they eliminate this tradition? I don't want to see it go. Now I'm interested in the behaviour of last Dali Lamas. Any sources you can recommend?

Buddhism will do fine without the Dalai Lama. What happens to Tibetan Buddhism is another question, but it is being destroyed anyway by the influx of Chinese into Tibet. Nothing is permanent, not even Buddhism and its institutions.

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DieChecker

Buddhism will do fine without the Dalai Lama. What happens to Tibetan Buddhism is another question, but it is being destroyed anyway by the influx of Chinese into Tibet. Nothing is permanent, not even Buddhism and its institutions.

I'd heard that Christianity and other religions were actually becoming more common in China. Perhaps the Tibetan Buddhists could influence the new Chinese immigrants into followers?

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third_eye

The local and distinct Tibetan culture unique to Tibet Buddhism is what keeps Tibet afloat and relevant today ~ Dalai or no dalai ~ Llamas still roam free ~

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mskate

well, at best , we have documentation of this last

14th Dalai Lama.... A lot of film and lectures...

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Nonnie1g4b

I have the most respect for HH the Dalai Lama XIV. His teachings are fabulous. His main teaching is to realize our place in the universe, that we are all connected. We should love and respect one another. He teaches that Peace has NEVER been won through war. (I suspect that the Crusades did as much or more killing than any other religion.) He teaches that "Freedom is the real source of happiness and creativity. Irrespective of whether you are a believer, Buddhist, Christian, or Jew, the important thing is to be a good human being." He also teaches that "My religion is simple. My religion is kindness." I read his teachings and am working to make my life positive and give what I would like to receive. I strive to be more tolerant of others. Especially in a country that guarantees us "Freedom of Religion." Who among us has the moral right to judge another?

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