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Stress may be behind bee colony collapse


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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Immense pressure being placed upon younger bees may be the key factor in colony collapse disorder.

The disappearance of bee populations in countries all over the world remains one of the most talked about mysteries of our time. With scientists unable to agree on exactly what is causing it, taking action to prevent further bee decline is notoriously problematic.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...colony-collapse

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So the bottom line is disease that attacks the adult bees. Maybe we can help out the situation by releasing some female bees with a few males from all of the bee keepers and let them start so new hives. Honey production might suffer for a bit, but we need the bees.

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Didn't they discover that wireless waves were contributing to bee deaths? Or was it Monsanto pesticides? Both? We can't afford to lose the bees - robot bees are the answer.

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Go to Youtube and watch "Resonance: Beings of Frequency". This is what's happening to the bees. Everyone should watch this because it concerns every living being on our planet.

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We need to create adult only bath hives for stress relief Including tiny poles on a raised honey comb floor with a nectar bar. May-bee start a Bee Blog called the BUZZ with tips on where to find plants for recreational use. The end result would bee an increase in single parent hives with an explosive population of rebellious youth that rarely rise above poverty. Over time, a small fraction of bees will have control over all of the world’s honey reserves and corrupt leadership will start wars with other hives. The upside is that War could create job opportunities for young bees with daddy issues, stimulating the bee-conomy.

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

There isn't any one key to the bees troubles. Just like there isn't any one magic bullet to a lot of other situations, and all we do is waste time and effort trying to pin that single thing- when it isn't a single thing at all.

It's pesticides and herbicides, polluted waters, restricted diets, diet habitat loss and poisoning, farming practices like the shuttling of hives from crop to crop, stress factors, air quality factors, frequency factors.. and I'm probably forgetting a few. And yes, they are stressed from all these things impacting them as well.

Another problem is how heavily we rely on European honeybees specifically. They are the pretty much covers all pollinators, but there are other pollinator species we could and should be utilizing as well. Like orchard bees, blueberry bees, bumble bees, carpenter bees, and other specialist or native bees- as well as other insects yet that are good pollinators. None of them make honey like the honeybee does- but a lot of them aren't being as negatively impacted as the honeybee is.

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I spent about a year working as a beekeeper here in the US. The common belief amongst beekeepers has always been that pesticides, pollution, and parasites are the number one culprits for Colony Collapse. The former two being far more of a factor than the parasites (most of our day consisted on delivering hives medicine to fight off the parasitic mites which can completely destroy a colony if left untreated). Our bees never suffered from total Collapse because we refused to do business with farmers who used pesticides on their crops (our largest concern was actually the potential for hives to Africanize). However, we witnessed declines in population on occasion regardless. Because bees don't really get the idea that they're supposed to stay on the farm we put them on, they'd often travel far beyond into farms which did use pesticides. The old timer I worked with was convinced most of these scientific studies were being funded by pesticide corporations like Monsanto in order to create more confusion over the matter. He also claimed that never once has he nor any of his colleagues ever been consulted on the issue (and tbh...professional beekeepers constitute a very small community in the US).

To me there's no mystery here. It seems enshrouding this phenomena in mystery is beneficial to particular corporate interests. Beekeepers have known the truth for quite some time now.

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That's three number one culprits, a feat worthy of the Guinness Book of Records.

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That's three number one culprits, a feat worthy of the Guinness Book of Records.

I'm pretty amazing. It's true. *takesabow* #stayhumble

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Bees are amazing creatures and certainly ones we cannot afford to let disappear...

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Well k0zm1k... what is your take on honeybees verses other bees? I mean, since you have been in the industry, you might have a different take on it than other beekeepers might.

Where I live in the midwest fuitland, there are some beekeepers that are starting to focus more on orchard or other specialized bees- mostly because they seem to have been less impacted and just as useful in their niches as honeybees. Other beekeeps are all about honeybees, but are starting to think more about protecting their hives, and using more "organic" methods.

I'm almost getting the feel that as much as folks want to hold on to honeybees and save them, some folks are girding up to taking on other bee husbandry and almost feeling defeated? lost? don't know what else to do but look elsewhere?

I'm only a small scale gardener/farmer and really talk to a lot of the same folk, so I might not have the insight that a more commercial beekeep has.

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I spent about a year working as a beekeeper here in the US. The common belief amongst beekeepers has always been that pesticides, pollution, and parasites are the number one culprits for Colony Collapse. The former two being far more of a factor than the parasites (most of our day consisted on delivering hives medicine to fight off the parasitic mites which can completely destroy a colony if left untreated). Our bees never suffered from total Collapse because we refused to do business with farmers who used pesticides on their crops (our largest concern was actually the potential for hives to Africanize). However, we witnessed declines in population on occasion regardless. Because bees don't really get the idea that they're supposed to stay on the farm we put them on, they'd often travel far beyond into farms which did use pesticides. The old timer I worked with was convinced most of these scientific studies were being funded by pesticide corporations like Monsanto in order to create more confusion over the matter. He also claimed that never once has he nor any of his colleagues ever been consulted on the issue (and tbh...professional beekeepers constitute a very small community in the US).

To me there's no mystery here. It seems enshrouding this phenomena in mystery is beneficial to particular corporate interests. Beekeepers have known the truth for quite some time now.

Well, it certainly makes sense that bees will be affected by insecticides. If they are not killed outright, it probably does stress their nervous system since many pesticides act as nerve agents on insects. I have noticed a decline in insects in general since I was a child. Part of the reason is the transformation of native plant habitats with exotics, but also constant spraying for mosquitos, as well as overuse of sprays on lawns, shrubs, city sprawl pushing out fields and forests and so forth. Gone are many of the butterfly and moth species I saw as a child, along with grasshoppers, mantids, certain dragonflies, damselflies. Craneflies are now more rare, especially the larger ones, hoverflies too are rarer. We still have native bees and I do see honeybees since I plant flowers that attract them, but they are far from common. While I don't want to live with disease carrying mosquitos, fire ants and so forth, I also don't want to live without the butterflies, dragonflies, bees and other parts of the natural world. We had better find a solution to this problem though, because it is becoming more widespread and we will dearly miss the bees that pollinate so many of the crops we consume.

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Well k0zm1k... what is your take on honeybees verses other bees? I mean, since you have been in the industry, you might have a different take on it than other beekeepers might.

Where I live in the midwest fuitland, there are some beekeepers that are starting to focus more on orchard or other specialized bees- mostly because they seem to have been less impacted and just as useful in their niches as honeybees. Other beekeeps are all about honeybees, but are starting to think more about protecting their hives, and using more "organic" methods.

I'm almost getting the feel that as much as folks want to hold on to honeybees and save them, some folks are girding up to taking on other bee husbandry and almost feeling defeated? lost? don't know what else to do but look elsewhere?

I'm only a small scale gardener/farmer and really talk to a lot of the same folk, so I might not have the insight that a more commercial beekeep has.

Well, let me start by saying it has been years since I have worked with bees and my boss was the real Bee Brains in the operation...so my knowledge is quite limited in comparison. However, I don't think we should give up on the honeybee just yet. They're an amazingly resilient creature and absolutely essential to pretty much every flowering and fruiting thing on Earth. The Beekeeper, as is my understanding, is the only thing that stands between them and inevitable extinction. I don't really know much about the various specialized bees, we worked primarily with honey bees (though admittedly my bossman would spend hours drooling over various types of Queens that he wanted to buy for his hives...but that stuff went over my head most of the time...he had been in the industry for decades as opposed to my year with him).

I also think there is a certain danger in breeding bees for specialization as this often involves hybridization which is pretty much what lead to the Africanized "Killer Bee." I've seen africanized bees. They're no joke. We had to destroy entire hives on occasion due to africanized bees somehow getting into the populations.

Ultimatley, it is humankind that will decide the fate of the honeybee. And that's a very sad place to be if you're a honeybee. But I do think if people are vigilant and speak out more and take direct action against factory farming, GMO crops, and pesticides, that we can indeed save them. And for all the stuff they do for us, I think they're definitely worth the fight. My time spent with bees literally changed my life.

I would love to get back into it as a hobby, unfortunately, here in Los Angeles, CA...not really the best environment for it.

Do you keep bees as well?

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

I don't think I can say I keep bees- unless "wild keeping" counts. I put out nesting boxes for bumble bees and tube nests for orchard bees and let them be rather than attentively work the nests like one does with honeybees. Orchard bees pretty much always nest, but bumbles can be a hit or miss.

I don't have my hives yet for honeybees- I'm supposed to be getting them this year so I can start a proper apiary next spring. It was supposed to be this year, but I got outvoted and the chicken coop is refurbished and restocked instead. Still trying to figure out if I can squeeze a top bar hive into the budget for this year though.

I agree with you that breeding for specialization can be dangerous. But I don't think there is any danger in keeping specialized bees like bumbles and orchards.

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