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Did a comet wipe out an entire civilization ?

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Author Graham Hancock claims that he has found new evidence to support his controversial theory.

Published in 1995, Hancock's book 'Fingerprints of the Gods' explored the idea that there existed an advanced civilization at around the end of the last Ice Age.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...re-civilization

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BadChadB33

I don't so much about ancient aliens, but I do think in the past we were a lot more advanced than what history states that we were.

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Hanslune

Author Graham Hancock claims that he has found new evidence to support his controversial theory.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...re-civilization

Short answer: No

Long answer: Read the short answer above and then take a look at the failure of the pole shift hypothesis.

I don't so much about ancient aliens, but I do think in the past we were a lot more advanced than what history states that we were.

Why do you think that?

Edited by Hanslune
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Thorvir

I don't so much about ancient aliens, but I do think in the past we were a lot more advanced than what history states that we were.

What makes you think that?

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Cesadelo

What makes you think that?

Well, I kinda think the same. Who knows what secrets were hidden in the library of Alexandria.

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Thorvir

Well, I kinda think the same. Who knows what secrets were hidden in the library of Alexandria.

.....OK, but.....

What makes you think this? And why do you assume that there are earth-shattering secrets hidden in that library? Most of the knowledge there was moved/copied to others places before it's destruction, so there isn't really anything in it that wasn't already known elsewhere.

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JinxDeMynx

I never knew a comet was strong enough to wipe out an entire town, let alone a civilization

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jarjarbinks

his books are good though. i really like the one about the ark of the covenant

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Kenemet

Short answer: no.

Long answer: Any area large enough for a civilization is a place with a lot of artifacts. A group of small villages is not the same as a civilization, and in any case (as others have said) there's no evidence of comets wiping out villages or anything else.

The comet scenario is also discounted by paleontologists -- there's no evidence of a sudden die-off, and the die-offs are pretty specific (elephants are left alive while their cousins in the same area (and same size) - mammoths, mastodons, gomptotheres, etc) die off.

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Hawken

.....OK, but.....

What makes you think this? And why do you assume that there are earth-shattering secrets hidden in that library? Most of the knowledge there was moved/copied to others places before it's destruction, so there isn't really anything in it that wasn't already known elsewhere.

If our civilization was wiped out by an asteroid or super volcano today and caused a major depopulation worldwide it would take eons for us to recover back to what we are today. Can you imagine how our descendants could speculate on how we lived. Though they might get some things right. A lot would have been lost over time by the disaster and only parts of the puzzle would be pieced together.

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stereologist

So Hancock and pole shift baloney are back. What we do know from studies of the Earth is that there has not been a pole shift in over 200My. Studies show that the only possible candidate for a pole shift is back 800My and that event involved a pole shift with a staggering shift rate of 1m a year. That is a phenomenally fast movement of the Earth. The cause for that movement is still being studied and there is also the chance that there are other explanations for the data suggesting the pole shift. The event did not happen as Hancock suggested. It was a change in the direction of the pole, but not a ECD event as Hapgood suggested and Hancock borrowed and renamed pole shift.

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Hanslune

Well, I kinda think the same. Who knows what secrets were hidden in the library of Alexandria.

...and were missed by all the scholars who worked there over the centuries....

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Hanslune

So Hancock and pole shift baloney are back. What we do know from studies of the Earth is that there has not been a pole shift in over 200My. Studies show that the only possible candidate for a pole shift is back 800My and that event involved a pole shift with a staggering shift rate of 1m a year. That is a phenomenally fast movement of the Earth. The cause for that movement is still being studied and there is also the chance that there are other explanations for the data suggesting the pole shift. The event did not happen as Hancock suggested. It was a change in the direction of the pole, but not a ECD event as Hapgood suggested and Hancock borrowed and renamed pole shift.

Good succinct summary

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Aten

Isn't this guy another sort of David Icke / Bob Lazar type chap (both of which are ....) well maybe not but he's trying to be a Von Daniken I guess :)

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DieChecker

Why would anyone chose to live in Antarctica? It is hell getting there, and there's nothing to eat. Unless you're strictly carnivorous. You couldn't support a city, much less a nation, there.

Isn't 13,000 years ago before agriculture was invented?

I'm curious to see what the evidence is, but I'm going to have to go into this extremely bias in what I'll believe.

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Thorvir

If our civilization was wiped out by an asteroid or super volcano today and caused a major depopulation worldwide it would take eons for us to recover back to what we are today. Can you imagine how our descendants could speculate on how we lived. Though they might get some things right. A lot would have been lost over time by the disaster and only parts of the puzzle would be pieced together.

Thank you, but what's that got to do with my post you quoted?

What makes you think this? And why do you assume that there are earth-shattering secrets hidden in that library? Most of the knowledge there was moved/copied to others places before it's destruction, so there isn't really anything in it that wasn't already known elsewhere.

In reference to the original Library of Alexandria?

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Hawken

Thank you, but what's that got to do with my post you quoted?

My bad, I quoted the wrong post. In post # 4 you quoted badchad about why he thinks the ancients were more advanced then given credit.

I followed up on it on what if something happened to our civilization and our descendants would view us from their perspective. I was attempting to give an idea what the situation was in reverse.

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COCO.PLATO

Honestly out of all the guys involved with those theories hancock is most on point id listen to him before von danaken or whatever

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Kenemet

If our civilization was wiped out by an asteroid or super volcano today and caused a major depopulation worldwide it would take eons for us to recover back to what we are today.

The chances of this happening are about zero.

A supervolcano would be a disaster for that area, unquestionably. But places are hit with vast disasters today (the large Christmas tsunami of 2004 is a good example) and although the rest of the world is impacted, it doesn't cause any civilization collapse. It depopulated the area directly affected, but it didn't depopulate Europe or Africa or the Americas.

If it hit the United States... well, the entire world isn't the United States. Research and manufacturing would still continue in every other country of the world. Traffic and trade would change, but it wouldn't depopulate the rest of the world.

The pseudo-science "OMG!! WIPES OUT CIVILIZATION!!!" pseudo-documentaries and Post-Apocalyptic movies (very popular) tend to present the idea that one disaster would completely paralyze the entire world and we'd all devolve to the stone age. While this is a plausible scenario back when h. sapiens ONLY lived in Africa and only consisted of a few tribes, it's....

...come to think of it, it's not that plausible back then. H. sapiens is only one of the hominids on planet Earth. Neanderthals would have taken over.

Can you imagine how our descendants could speculate on how we lived. Though they might get some things right. A lot would have been lost over time by the disaster and only parts of the puzzle would be pieced together.

This didn't even happen in the past, actually.

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BeastieRunner

Man, I've been waiting for the day to debate Pole Shift Theory again!

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Allesehir
https://gsa.confex.c...254858.html of course it wasn't 13000 years ago, that would be their magic tea leaves and time machines talkin and telling them everything they ever wanted to hear. . Edited by Allesehir

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Hawken

The chances of this happening are about zero.

A supervolcano would be a disaster for that area, unquestionably. But places are hit with vast disasters today (the large Christmas tsunami of 2004 is a good example) and although the rest of the world is impacted, it doesn't cause any civilization collapse. It depopulated the area directly affected, but it didn't depopulate Europe or Africa or the Americas.

If it hit the United States... well, the entire world isn't the United States. Research and manufacturing would still continue in every other country of the world. Traffic and trade would change, but it wouldn't depopulate the rest of the world.

The pseudo-science "OMG!! WIPES OUT CIVILIZATION!!!" pseudo-documentaries and Post-Apocalyptic movies (very popular) tend to present the idea that one disaster would completely paralyze the entire world and we'd all devolve to the stone age. While this is a plausible scenario back when h. sapiens ONLY lived in Africa and only consisted of a few tribes, it's....

...come to think of it, it's not that plausible back then. H. sapiens is only one of the hominids on planet Earth. Neanderthals would have taken over.

This didn't even happen in the past, actually.

There are other dangers out there other then asteroids and super volcanos . Solar Flares for example. We are a technological society and all that tech requires 1 key ingredient to function and that is electricity. Without it, we're dead in the water. We are more advanced today then 100 years ago, but we are very vulnerable. I'm sure most of us had to endure a summer or winter storm where it knock out the power for a few hours or even days. We take it for granted until this happens. Gives a person a wake up call.

Edited by Hawkin
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Sir Wearer of Hats

Isn't this guy another sort of David Icke / Bob Lazar type chap (both of which are ....) well maybe not but he's trying to be a Von Daniken I guess :)

Actually, Icke and Bobby Bob are Graham Hancock types.

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