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Dinosaurs laid colourful blue-green eggs


Still Waters
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

The American robin lent its name to a striking shade of blue, but the vivid hue may have been colouring eggs long before the bird evolved - perhaps long before any birds evolved. It may have appeared in the dinosaur ancestors of birds that lived 150 million years ago.

Although recent studies have revealed the colours of dinosaur feathers, skin and scales, we had known nothing about the original colour of their eggs.

http://www.newscient...ws#.VWd5SVL-EdU

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This still does not answer if dinosaur eggs tasted better with sausage or bacon.

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Just like chicken or other bird eggs!

This still does not answer if dinosaur eggs tasted better with sausage or bacon.

There were no pigs then. I think the earliest pig-like animal in it's family came ~3.4 million years ago. Almost a 62 million year wait for dinosaur eggs and bacon or sausage. :D

Edited by BeastieRunner
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Isn't this like a given? I mean isn't it like saying, 'yeah looking at blah blah blah scientists think that the trees in prehistoric time were probably green' why wouldn't eggs be different colours?, just like birds eggs today. Oh and my personal guess is that the sky 'back then' was probably blue. :)

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Isn't this like a given? I mean isn't it like saying, 'yeah looking at blah blah blah scientists think that the trees in prehistoric time were probably green' why wouldn't eggs be different colours?, just like birds eggs today. Oh and my personal guess is that the sky 'back then' was probably blue. :)

Well ... the night sky (actual stars and constellations aside) would've looked drastically different (no to little stars) and the sun would've appeared bigger (hazer or fuzzier).

This is not to say that the Sun and stars of the Mesozoic sky would look exactly the same as they do today. Astronomers are well aware of how atmospheric turbulence deflects starlight causing stars to twinkle. During the Mesozoic era, starlight passing through such a thick atmosphere would be thrown about so much by atmospheric turbulence that individual stars may not have been distinguishable. Likewise because of the extreme thickness of the atmosphere the Mesozoic Sun would probably appear slightly hazy in comparison to how it appears today.

But yes, mostly accurate.

SOURCE.

It has also been theorized to have been reddish blue or even orange during atmospheric disturbances 2.5 billion years ago. But still predominately blue to the human eye.

Edited by BeastieRunner
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...It has also been theorized to have been reddish blue...

Most people call that 'purple'.

Edited by Lilly
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That's real cool. When I was a kid I found a nest of pinkish-red eggs when climbing a tree. Didn't touch them. RIB NOB

Edited by Zalmoxis
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