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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 3]

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Americanaryan, the links are interesting but I was under the impression the C282Y was spread by Vikings..

http://www.hemochromatosisdna.com/about-the-disease/viking-ancestry#.WiNfC4jXerU

 

 

Edited by The Puzzler
Took out some blah blah
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I do however think all this worldwide priestly class does stem from one very ancient source. The  Bible goes straight into the building of the most ancient towns, Erech etc, some sort of pre-history is already with these people at that point, kept as Josephus says by a very ancient priesthood but many of these people fell into ways that were seen as evil, not part of who the Jews became, like Druids or Babylonian priests/priestesses. The core is the same though imo, maybe stemming back even tens of thousands of years, before Gobekli Tepe by eons. 

Aristotle says the Jewish priesthood came from India. 

The Magi that announced Jesus birth seem to have caused the Jews a lot of trouble, offshoots from Persia looking for power.

Its one of the main reasons I like the OLB, I can see the manipulations of the Magi as quite real.

Edited by The Puzzler
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What we can't escape however between Jews and Celts is red hair.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_hair

The Ligurians, strangely enough with Scotland being described as Liguria in Himilcos periplus, the Ligurians near Italy are described as thus: 

 

Lucan in his Pharsalia (c. 61 AD) described Ligurian tribes as being long-haired, and their hair a shade of auburn (a reddish-brown):

...Ligurian tribes, now shorn, in ancient days

First of the long-haired nations, on whose necks
Once flowed the auburn locks in pride supreme

According to Plutarch, the Ligurians called themselves Ambrones, which could indicate a relationship with the Ambrones of northern Europe.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ligures

Columbus was Ligurian.

 

 

 

 

Edited by The Puzzler
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Ironically, earlier on, Celts were generally not described as having red hair but yellow, the red heads were Germanic and old Thracian.

The Beaumont theory on pre-Celtic Britons being a Germanic Belgae type, as per van gorps comment re Britain being a penal colony in the OLB. Australia was a penal colony, in short time, colonists usually inhabit penal colonies, for admin. If nothing else.

 

 

Edited by The Puzzler

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19 hours ago, The Puzzler said:

Did we ever agree on what the etymology of KALTA was?

On the other side of the Scheldt, at Flyburgt, Sijrhed presided. This maiden was full of tricks. Her face was beautiful, and her tongue was nimble; but the advice that she gave was always conveyed in mysterious terms. Therefore the mariners called her Kalta, and the landsmen thought it was a title.

Etymology for KILT came up as KJALTA - to tuck up, to swaddle - to WRAP (up her words in mysterious terms). O.N

Then that sounds like a connection to her name being relative to KELTS, maybe their real etymology too.

Maybe I already said it or someone else did, too long, too bad a memory but I get stuck on small things... which I'm trying to clarify.

I think from the verb 'Kallen' (to talk, see call https://www.etymonline.com/word/call):

http://gtb.inl.nl/iWDB/search?actie=article&wdb=WNT&id=M029681

See another passage in OLB:

  "No true Frisian shall speak ill of the faults of his neighbours Nên æfta Fryas skil ovira misslêga sinra nêste malja nach kalta"

 

Interesting though the Kilt, the Celts as those wearing the Kilt? May be. I think of Kleed and Kilt as the same (om-hulsel wrapped around the body), and the wrapped-up words can be from the same: ge-huld in mysterie and formulas (flauwe kul?). Here i think the other connection with Kelt and Cold comes from the same: when it's cold (koud), people walk ge-huld (wrapped up). Another word for kallen is kouten -> hullen & houden. When we see this we can think of cold and hold stemming from the same: wrapped up or fixed (i just think of hout, wood as being the primary source for keeping things on their place). Geld as money normally keeps it value also (geld=gold=goud=ge-houd).

Because that is my opinion: the hard K can be replaced with soft G.  The Kelts are the Gauls (later also the Wallons(GU=W).

But i think question remains open whether the Celts are called like this for the colder climate, the kiltlike robes clothes or as followers of a 'kallende' mother.

Edited by Van Gorp
changed robes into clothes: more appropriate noun for the topic: cloth and cold :-)
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Van Gorp, thanks for the food for thought.

Edited by The Puzzler

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It's just about defining the name that the OLB translates the Celts to but I agree it works well as kalta = speak, chatter (to call, shout) https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/gala

Moving on...

Edited by The Puzzler
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On 12/3/2017 at 2:40 AM, The Puzzler said:

Did we ever agree on what the etymology of KALTA was?

One more note on "kàlta":

A modern cognate is Swedish: kälta - to nag, whine.

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In addition to another intriguing word used in OLB and discussed more in detail by Ott: "Od" :-)

 

Od trâd to-ra binna: ænd nw bârdon ek twilif svna ænd twilif togathera ek joltid twên. Thêrof send alle mænneska kêmen.

Translated by Sandabach:

Hatred found its way among them. They each bore twelve sons and twelve daughters—at every Juul-time a couple. Thence come all mankind.

I remember Ott mentionning the possible wrong translation, maybe even the opposite.

 

Hadewijch (a 13th century, sic!!, mystica) used the word 'orewoet'.  'De Minne' or the divine (transcendental) love.

Here the original description in Dutch: http://hadewijch.net/orewoet/

Here the English google translation: https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=nl&sl=nl&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fhadewijch.net%2Forewoet%2F

 

" The Hadewijch expert of Jozef van Mierlo has carefully examined how Hadewijch uses this key word. According to him, 'orewoet' has everything to do with a firm, passionate love of love. "

...

" Other researchers and translators from Hadewijch have shown that 'orewoet' has to do with a 'strong and burning desire' (De Paepe, Mommaerts), 'impetuous urge' (Mommaerts) and a 'crazy and frightening desire' (Vekemans). It is striking that the English and French translations refer much more to 'anger' and 'madness' (madness, violence, fureur). "

-> indeed, we see this also with Sandbach

 

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Another tricky one.

 

Edited by The Puzzler

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On 15.12.2017 at 10:14 PM, Van Gorp said:

In addition to another intriguing word used in OLB and discussed more in detail by Ott: "Od" :-)

 

Od trâd to-ra binna: ænd nw bârdon ek twilif svna ænd twilif togathera ek joltid twên. Thêrof send alle mænneska kêmen.

Translated by Sandabach:

Hatred found its way among them. They each bore twelve sons and twelve daughters—at every Juul-time a couple. Thence come all mankind.

I remember Ott mentionning the possible wrong translation, maybe even the opposite.

Maby you have read something like this before...

Maria Kvilhaug translates Od or Odr as Spirit. I have read her big book about Old Norse mytology called the seed of Yggdrasil. Odin is then translateed as master of spirit, or someone who has followed the spirit to its origin or something like it. (maby my own words  :-) Maria mention it here.


Here is another one.Óðr (pronounced roughly “OH-thur,” with a hard “th” as in “the”) is an Old Norse word that has no direct equivalent in modern English. The word, and the wonderful concept to which it refers, is as little understood today as it was ubiquitous in pre-Christian Germanic mythology and religion.

Óðr is generally translated as something along the lines of “divine inspiration” or “inspired mental activity.”[1] While such translations will do where óðr is only mentioned in passing as part of a larger discussion, they gloss over the richness and dynamism of the word and its connotations, and are therefore inadequate for lengthier considerations of óðr such as the one in which we happen to find ourselves just now.

The word had cognates – words that mean the same thing and have the same linguistic origin – in the other Germanic languages, which attest to its universality throughout the ancient Germanic world. For example, in Old English it was wod, and in Old High German it was wuot. All of these originally stem from the Proto-Germanic *woþ-, which in turn stems from the Indo-European *uat-. Words from other branches of the Indo-European family of languages that were based on this root include the Latin vates, “soothsayer” or “poet,” and the Old Irish fáith, “seer” or “prophet.”[2]

Other Germanic words that originated in this same root – to cite but a few of the many – include Old English woþ, “sound, song, voice, poetry,” and woþbora, “poet, orator, prophet;” Old Saxon wodian, “to rage, to be raving mad or crazy;” and Old Norse øsa, “to make raving mad or crazy.”[3] Even the name of Odin himself is derived from this word (Old Norse Óðinn, “Master of Óðr“). Hence the famous remark by the eleventh-century German historian Adam of Bremen: “Wodan, id est furor” (“Odin, that is, furor”).[4]

Óðr is a force that causes people to create or perform any of the arts; to pronounce a prophecy; to enter an ecstatic trance, as in shamanism; to produce scholarly works; to enter into the battlefield frenzy that was the hallmark of Odin’s elite warriors, the berserkers and úlfheðnar; or to become possessed or go mad.

Óðr is a power that overwhelms and infuses one’s being to its core, which ousts one’s mundane consciousness and turns one into a frenzied, ecstatic vessel for some mysterious, divine agency that is palpably present in the act. This could certainly happen in the realms of life with which we associate the relatively neutered modern English world “inspiration,” such as the arts and acts of clairvoyance, but it could also happen in cases where we wouldn’t typically use “inspiration,” such as scholarly writing, the fury of the warrior in the heat of battle, or insanity (and here we must bear in mind that “’madness,’ to earlier peoples, did not mean loss of control; it meant control by Someone Else: inspiration or possession”).[5]

Of course, if we were to use the word “inspiration” in its original sense – “to be under the immediate influence of God or a god”[6] – then “inspiration” and óðr would effectively be synonymous. But since “inspiration” has gradually lost these connotations of divine agency and seen its range of meaning narrow over time, it’s important to point out this distinction.

And as if its range of associated acts or spheres of life wasn’t extensive enough, óðr was also the means by which knowledge of the higher or subtler sort was acquired. This should be implicitly evident in its being behind scholarly works, prophecies, and visionary trances, but I discuss some of the epistemological (theory of knowledge) implications of óðr directly and at some length in the article on the tale of The Mead of Poetry. Speaking of which…

 

Edited by Skirnum
..
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I like this post, but add a note to the following statement:

On 12/17/2017 at 7:38 PM, Skirnum said:

All of these originally stem from the Proto-Germanic *woþ-, which in turn stems from the Indo-European *uat-.

To wit: be aware that these 'proto-' words were provided by models, based on questionable assumptions.

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