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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 3]


Abramelin
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La Tene, not too sure who named it but if I went with some kind of early proto-Celt language name, it could be called something like 'the (place of) fire', (Breton Cornish Old Irish tan Gaelic teine) considering it was an iron-working centre it's not that strange, another connection there is it might actually be the same root for Thor, thunder.

Some kind of name for a loud, thunderous hammering, fiery ironworks.

Etruscan Tinia is the equivalent of Jupiter, so the Etruscan name Tinia could actually be connected IMO, maybe even tin.

Edited by The Puzzler
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Its all just so confusing , as there are so many possibilities , and so many opinions in connection with etymology

i am currently reading collectanea de rebus hibernicus..... it conjectures that Ganga means just river , so it was not its name,but a description , its name was the Sunnan , which they then connect to the Shannon ........, the large lake on the Shannon called Lough Rhea they then connect this name to the Locrians , and Gaius as a Roman pre-nom , they say came from Galus.

it then takes another 3 months to finish the book , because you are constantly following up each point , which straightaway needs more research ... eg:- typing Galus into google leads me straight to a definition of the jewish diaspora of the 6th C.(two words which i had never connected before )so

are the Gauls , Galicians ,Galli all Semites , ex Galileans ?

i feel like i am going round in circles.....could be time for a break .

Round some more...

The blazon of Marin-Epagnier's coat-of-arms is: "Sable, a Lion rampant or langued and armed Gules".

Marin-Espagnier is the municipality of La Tene.

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The lion is the insignia of Judah , and also the coat of arms on many a western countries flag , Brutus is supposed to have founded Britain , who is descended from Aeneas ex Troy ,who married Latinus daughter ,and became king .according to DictysTroia was in Phrigia , sounds like Frisia , and where the men with the frigian cap come from which is supposed

to mark them out as free men, if they need to be marked out , then presumeably they used to be slaves,

Brutus went to Sparta saw that many of his ancestors were still being used as slaves by the Spartans, they were captured when sparta conquered the Messenes (Essenes?) he became their leader and captured the/a Greek king who agreed to let them all go, after supplying ships and provisions........They sailed to Gaul and some on to Britain.

see what i mean about circles,....... every time i mention jews/semitics in the west ,i get told that i am

talking rubbish , and that the Brit-Am theory is old hat , and has been proven as false years ago , however i have never come across proffesional proof of that ( but perhaps someone will now pass a link on ) and have just been reading about semitic genes found in studies of Vikings ........ more circles.

Edited by Passing Time
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Round some more...

The blazon of Marin-Epagnier's coat-of-arms is: "Sable, a Lion rampant or langued and armed Gules".

Marin-Espagnier is the municipality of La Tene.

A good lesson in what Gules are...lol

OK, so this is a description of the heraldry, probably irrelevant.

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are the Gauls , Galicians ,Galli all Semites , ex Galileans ?

Galileans. Well done! (I had concluded the same some months ago. And I could have concluded the same fifteen years ago, but it took some time and other discoveries before the dime dropped.) There is no connection whatsoever with the Franks.

Edited by Ell
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Some more thoughts on

  • the Casimirs as personal name:imo to do with a governemental function pointing to something as "Intendant" (rent-meester of Hof-meester), Casa-Meier (m'Heer: the Mayor of the Casa). Note: the cassier is the Kas-Heer, the responsible of the finance (KAS for money, same meaning as KAS in mountain: save enclosure).
  • Kashmir as region name: to be linked with other Kashes and Mrs like Mara-kesh, Meru & Kush, Kush of Hindu, Cau-Kash, Kashyapa in Kash-Mir and Caspean Sea. Kas is for me then to be connected with a secured dwelling place & Mountains. KAS -> the inclination of a little hill we still call a "kas-ke".
  • La Tène: could be "the town" :-) Like "tuin", garden which is bordered/fenced in it's name. See the use of pallisades for the escape-burghs in La Tène period.

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Some more thoughts on

  • the Casimirs as personal name:imo to do with a governemental function pointing to something as "Intendant" (rent-meester of Hof-meester), Casa-Meier (m'Heer: the Mayor of the Casa). Note: the cassier is the Kas-Heer, the responsible of the finance (KAS for money, same meaning as KAS in mountain: save enclosure).
  • Kashmir as region name: to be linked with other Kashes and Mrs like Mara-kesh, Meru & Kush, Kush of Hindu, Cau-Kash, Kashyapa in Kash-Mir and Caspean Sea. Kas is for me then to be connected with a secured dwelling place & Mountains. KAS -> the inclination of a little hill we still call a "kas-ke".
  • La Tène: could be "the town" :-) Like "tuin", garden which is bordered/fenced in it's name. See the use of pallisades for the escape-burghs in La Tène period.

What do you mean by escape burghs VG , are you talking about the towns supposedly set up as a place of refuge for

people who have been accused of a crime , but before they have either been convicted by the law/courts , or before the

injured parties family can take their own revenge . i think this was part of the Danelaw was it not , it is

certainly mentioned in OBL , where the oeramother could allow someone to be sent away for safety , and these places are mentioned in the bible , was sodom not one of these towns of refuge , and when reading some of the older history

books , you often see it mentioned " a town built by the Law" which this probably refers to.

regarding the casa or cas-m-heer are you talking about maybe someone in the town who's

responsibility it was to pay the tribute , say like ground rent , the person to collect

and pay the money out ..... the Cashier , or cas-heer .

Edited by Passing Time
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What do you mean by escape burghs VG , are you talking about the towns supposedly set up as a place of refuge for

people who have been accused of a crime , but before they have either been convicted by the law/courts , or before the

injured parties family can take their own revenge . i think this was part of the Danelaw was it not , it is

certainly mentioned in OBL , where the oeramother could allow someone to be sent away for safety , and these places are mentioned in the bible , was sodom not one of these towns of refuge , and when reading some of the older history

books , you often see it mentioned " a town built by the Law" which this probably refers to.

regarding the casa or cas-m-heer are you talking about maybe someone in the town who's

responsibility it was to pay the tribute , say like ground rent , the person to collect

and pay the money out ..... the Cashier , or cas-heer .

Hi Passing Time,

Definitely interesting what you mention about "... a place of refuge for people who have been accused of a crime ...".

I saw a it a bit more general, so just a place for refuge for people.

In that case probably shelter for the whole and near community for 3 main causes: against unfriendly visits, against flooding and to garantee safe haven for commerce.

When people gather in a stricted area for a longer time: regulations are needed and published for clearity (on animal skins/draperies/carved tags on the wall).

As not all could read, the 'formulas' where just images to explain the point, as for kids we still do.

In La Tene there is also an oppidum and many weaponry found. I think it was a fabric and commerce zone (for weaponry).

But your point about "a town built by the Law" seems to me an exponent of that.

I must say I general considered these burghs in OLB as ringwall burgs with the Dunjon as mothers stair, not in as much to be kept in guard not to merry someone (like later was thought to be the case), but as watcher over the community (and possible threads from outside) in all solomnty.

Concerning Cas-m-heer: indeed a person in charge of collecting taxes, to see everybody comply with their duties, so the household is on order.

He is the chaser, de ketser. Like a cat catches, it is from this same root as KAS (holding) i think.

The Hesses are also such payed chasers.

He is the delegated Master of the House, who runs the household finance and uses force to do so.

A global rise of this group (the 'Hofmeiers') to power can be seen also in Merovech/Pepenide/Frankish tales.

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De Jong suggested in 1927 (Het geheim van het Oera-Linda-Boek) that KASAMIR referred to Latin Casus Mirus (rare case).

Page one of my new English Oera Linda translation (experimental phase). I have decided not to stick to the original wording, but make it a more easy read, with possibility of comparing to transliteration and original manuscript. Let me know what you think.

OLBnummeruitleg.jpg

OLB001EN.jpg

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De Jong suggested in 1927 (Het geheim van het Oera-Linda-Boek) that KASAMIR referred to Latin Casus Mirus (rare case).

Page one of my new English Oera Linda translation (experimental phase). I have decided not to stick to the original wording, but make it a more easy read, with possibility of comparing to transliteration and original manuscript. Let me know what you think.

Very good Jan, i find it practical to read and see the original in one view.

Concerning casus mirus, thnx for info. I came across link below. I haven't read it yet, don't know what it is about.

If anyone has a clue ... In first glance about one of the Casimirs or is it the region?

Casus mirus de Casu Casimiri nemlich ein ? wunder

http://bvbm1.bib-bvb.de/view/action/singleViewer.do?dvs=1445108810291~328&locale=nl&VIEWER_URL=/view/action/singleViewer.do?&DELIVERY_RULE_ID=35&frameId=1&usePid1=true&usePid2=true

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Very good Jan, i find it practical to read and see the original in one view.

Concerning casus mirus, thnx for info. I came across link below. I haven't read it yet, don't know what it is about.

If anyone has a clue ... In first glance about one of the Casimirs or is it the region?

Casus mirus de Casu Casimiri nemlich ein ? wunder

http://bvbm1.bib-bvb...ue&usePid2=true

have you got that link right VG , if i click it , it just comes up "Ihre sitzung ist abgelaufen"... i imagine " this site is forbidden " or similar ???

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De Jong suggested in 1927 (Het geheim van het Oera-Linda-Boek) that KASAMIR referred to Latin Casus Mirus (rare case).

a chance miracle - a happy accident - rare wonder

case (n.1) early 13c., "what befalls one; state of affairs," from Old French cas "an event, happening, situation, quarrel, trial," from Latin casus "a chance, occasion, opportunity; accident, mishap," literally "a falling," from cas-, past participle stem of cadere "to fall, sink, settle down, decline, perish" (used widely: of the setting of heavenly bodies, the fall of Troy, suicides), from PIE root *kad- "to lay out, fall or make fall, yield, break up" (cognates: Sanskrit sad- "to fall down," Armenian chacnum "to fall, become low," perhaps also Middle Irish casar "hail, lightning"). The notion being "that which falls" as "that which happens" (compare befall).

mirus: From Proto-Indo-European *(s)meyə- ‎(“to laugh, be glad, wonder”). Cognate with Swedish smila ‎(“to smile”), Middle High German smielen ‎(“to smile”), Old High German smierōn ‎(“to smile”), Old English smerian ‎(“to laugh at”), Old English smercian, smearcian ‎(“to smile”), smile.

mīrus m ‎(feminine mīra, neuter mīrum, comparative mīrior, superlative mīrissimus); first/second declension

  1. wonderful, marvellous, amazing, surprising, awesome

May likely be what the OLB writer did translate Kasamyr as indeed but I wonder if it's the true etymology of Kashmir. (not that it really matters here) At least that solved the sjeldum comparison, thank **** for that, it was driving me nuts.

Edited by The Puzzler
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have you got that link right VG , if i click it , it just comes up "Ihre sitzung ist abgelaufen"... i imagine " this site is forbidden " or similar ???

"Our site is expired"..

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have you got that link right VG , if i click it , it just comes up "Ihre sitzung ist abgelaufen"... i imagine " this site is forbidden " or similar ???

Strange, yesterday i began reading the text from that site.

Try this one:

http://reader.digitale-sammlungen.de/de/fs1/object/display/bsb11066904_00005.html

Following this site the author was Jan (John) Kazimierz II from Poland (or ordered it). Published in 1655.

There are also Latin versions to be found.

The title is to be explained:

"Casus Mirus de Casu Casimiri : nemblich Ein vberauß wunderbarlicher Zufall, welcher dem König Casimiro widerfahren"

... a very wonderful luck/coincidence, which fell upon King Casimiro.

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"Our site is expired"..

Thank you for that SSilhouette.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=pppFAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA1&lpg=PA

google 8 pages called Casus Mirus de Casucasimirus nemblich Ein Uberaus Wunder....... probably very enlightening

if only i could read it ,but its all :alien: to me unfortunately

Edited by Passing Time
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Strange, yesterday i began reading the text from that site.

Try this one:

http://reader.digita...6904_00005.html

Following this site the author was Jan (John) Kazimierz II from Poland (or ordered it). Published in 1655.

There are also Latin versions to be found.

The title is to be explained:

"Casus Mirus de Casu Casimiri : nemblich Ein vberauß wunderbarlicher Zufall, welcher dem König Casimiro widerfahren"

... a very wonderful luck/coincidence, which fell upon King Casimiro.

dont you just hate it when something like that happens.....and it does quite often with names and meanings. so Puzz toils away to find out the meaning of Casa Meer (Kasmir ) then you find the above...... so when he was born/christened/named how did they know a 'happy coincidence ' was going to befall him...... is Casimiro just a nickname given to him after the occurence ?

what was the Happy Coincidence by the way ??

Edited by Passing Time
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dont you just hate it when something like that happens.....and it does quite often with names and meanings. so Puzz toils away to find out the meaning of Casa Meer (Kasmir ) then you find the above...... so when he was born/christened/named how did they know a 'happy coincidence ' was going to befall him...... is Casimiro just a nickname given to him after the occurence ?

what was the Happy Coincidence by the way ??

Good question,

I'm not sure how to interprete but it seems to me about the Swedish Deluge of Poland-Lithuania.

In 1655 Germanic mercenaries invaded Poland for Swedish control, Jan Kazimierz II Waza of Poland had to flee to (the hands of) the Habsburghs.

The fall of a King (or Ex Rex) ... was this such a happy coinncidence I wonder (and then for whom?).

Is it the uprise of the people the author glorifies or is it written from the sight of the adverseries?

I haven't got the time to read in full to get the drift correct.

In this case admirable:

the Casu Miru as the FALL (cadit) of a king is perceived as a WONDERlich Zu-FALL and has wonder and fall in many senses.

Edit:

After quick pondering further: the zu-fall i saw in the beginning could be actually ment as unforeseen accurance, not in the sense of a lucky accurance.

After the golden age of Poland the down-fall?

Edited by Van Gorp
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Good question,

I'm not sure how to interprete but it seems to me about the Swedish Deluge of Poland-Lithuania.

In 1655 Germanic mercenaries invaded Poland for Swedish control, Jan Kazimierz II Waza of Poland had to flee to (the hands of) the Habsburghs.

The fall of a King (or Ex Rex) ... was this such a happy coinncidence I wonder (and then for whom?).

Is it the uprise of the people the author glorifies or is it written from the sight of the adverseries?

I haven't got the time to read in full to get the drift correct.

In this case admirable:

the Casu Miru as the FALL (cadit) of a king is perceived as a WONDERlich Zu-FALL and has wonder and fall in many senses.

Edit:

After quick pondering further: the zu-fall i saw in the beginning could be actually ment as unforeseen accurance, not in the sense of a lucky accurance.

After the golden age of Poland the down-fall?

It is a good question.

If we look at the etymology again:

case (n.1) early 13c., "what befalls one; state of affairs," from Old French cas "an event, happening, situation, quarrel, trial," from Latin casus "a chance, occasion, opportunity; accident, mishap," literally "a falling," from cas-, past participle stem of cadere "to fall, sink, settle down, decline, perish" (used widely: of the setting of heavenly bodies, the fall of Troy, suicides), from PIE root *kad- "to lay out, fall or make fall, yield, break up" (cognates: Sanskrit sad- "to fall down," Armenian chacnum "to fall, become low," perhaps also Middle Irish casar "hail, lightning"). The notion being "that which falls" as "that which happens" (compare befall).

Notice the 'casa' meaning actually also denotes 'a fall'. - the event, occurance, accident is defined as literally 'a fall' - however, with mirus, it seems to give it the positive aspect - a happy/miraculous occurance. But a miraculous occurance doesn't necessarily in itself mean it's great or good, it just means it's a 'rare case', good or bad.

the word cascade comes to mind, which I haven't looked at but it's a falling thing, with both cas- and cad- as above in it. A deluge could be a cascade of water.

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Latin casus "a chance, occasion, opportunity; accident, mishap," literally "a falling," from cas-, past participle stem of cadere "to fall, sink, settle down, decline, perish"

Interesting.

The dutch word is "geval" (ge-val: event, case)

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I get the impression from all these interpretations that it may mean...that a complete disaster for someone , can be an absolute god sent opportunity for someone else.

Edited by Passing Time
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Could happy coincidence be a reference to his conception?

jmccr8

I'm not really sure on that jmccr8, but nice to see the interest.

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Interesting.

The dutch word is "geval" (ge-val: event, case)

The Frisian word is 'fall' - and English. Fall but also be due, happen (occurance - event, case)

falla (1) 50 und häufiger, fella (1), fal-l-a, fel-l-a (1), afries., st. V. (7)=red. V. (1): nhd. fallen, sinken, flüchten, ausfallen, zur Folge haben, zufallen, in Betracht kommen, sich belaufen, gehören zu, fällig werden, betragen, treffen, sich treffen, sich ereignen, kommen; ne. fall (V.), flee, cause (V.), count (V.), be due, happen; ÜG.: lat. cadere WE, (ēmendāre) K 15, L 23; Vw.: s. bi-*, for-a-, of-, on-, ont-, tō-, ūt-, wi-ther-; Hw.: s. fel-l-a (2); vgl. an. falla, ae. feallan, anfrk. fallan, as. fallan, ahd. fallan; Q.: R, W, S, E, B, Jur, WE, K 15, L 23; E.: germ. *fallan, st. V., fallen; idg. *phō̆l-, *sphaln-, V., fallen, Pokorny 851, Kluge s. u. fallen; W.: nfries. fallen, V., fallen; L.: Hh 23b, Rh 725b

??? (no biggie, just interesting...) valley (n.) c. 1300, from Anglo-French valey, Old French valee "a valley" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *vallata, from Latin vallis "valley," of unknown origin.

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