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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 3]


Abramelin
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Given that the tower is 90 feet tall, which is only slightly more than twice 42, we should not be imagining a tall, thin tower at all, but actually a rather low, wide one. If the sides were more than 21 feet wide (they cannot possibly be less, given the position of the attached houses), this wideness is increased still further.

So, would they be more like the brochs or wheelhouses then?

As for the holy fire of Van Gorp and Passing Time, let's see what Austro-Hungarian officer Karl Maria Wiligut (1866-1946) had to say on his family traditions, writing in 1935:

The institution of girls' schools developed out of the extremely ancient "Modranekth."
2
[
2
"society of maidens"] [...] So, for example, it came about that virgins who were chosen as BURGMAIDENS had to conform special conditions. [...]

The corps of maidens was organized in four groups, which are: The lowest group, the HEXAS [witches], had as their duty the care and preservation of the eternal flame and its kindling for purposes of signaling (by day with smoke, by night with a bright flame)[*]. Fire was fetched from these women as a part of certain ceremonies or ritual (Ara-Ryta] for the lighting the hearth-fire of newly married couples. As a part of land-taking or new settlement ceremonies, or when perhaps the hearth-fire had gone out, fire was kindled from live coals from these eternal fires. The Hexas were initiated into herbology in some tribes and communities in addition to their service relevan to the fire. [...]

From this presentation of the basic division of the
Maidenschaft
it is clear what a deep meaning the position of women had in past times. In the clan she was the protector and irector of honor of men as well as women. In the tribe she was the representative of high idealistic flights of thought and the kindler of enthuasism for great aims in the interest of the tribe and folk. [...]

Closely connected to the cosmos, to the All and to God, and reflecting the rhytmic lwas of these in her soul, she was the bearer of the whole of our tradition in our prehistoric past. It was with this understanding that the education of the female youth was designed. [
The Secret King
, translated by Stephen Flowers, 2001.]

* Such signaling reminds not only of the beacon ligh houses for the sailors, but also of the Finnish hill fort system, where they were situated according to archeologists so that they could alarm each other by signal fire and smoke. This is seen in the story of Norwegian Saint Olaf, where he attacks Finnish coast called Balegard (as in English 'balefire' or Finnish palo 'fire'), yet the heathen Finns succesfully evade him by withdrawing to inland, and then after amassing their own forces make a counter-attack. This all means that they likely had a foreknowledge of the impeding raid, as the counter actions had been systematic and not haphazard or random in style. Thus also the Wiligut story of signal fire makes sense in the North European cultural context.

In fact, I tend to believe that the Lamp must have been something like the ancient so-called 'julleuchters', which have been found in different places in Northern Europe

I don't know about you Scandinavians, but here in Finland we have this thing called joululyhty. In the primary school we all children made ones. While they nowadays are any lamps with small candles inside, the iconography of the German julleuchter (hearts, wheels, zigzag) is well known from folk wood art of all Nordic nations, including ours.

Edited by FromFinland
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The foddik is the oillamp using a vod (wick of rag)

The Swedish 'föda' means food, to feed, to give birth. The Swedish 'dika' means to drain. The Swedish 'dike' means ditch.

I do not hold that these Swedish words are related to foddik - but it is something to keep in mind.

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I know I rarely post in this thread but I'm an occasional lurker, and noticed your post. I think I can shed some important light on your interest in this matter and clear up a few things.

First of all , thanks for your input kmt ,which is much appreciated , will help to keep me on the straight and narrow .

Ahmose I is responsible for ultimately repelling the Hyksos and launching the New Kingdom, Egypt's unparalleled period of empire. The war had been started by his father, Seqenenre Tao II, whose mummy shows in all likelihood that he died in battle. The removal of the Hyksos from Egypt was concluded by around 1550 BCE, which happens to be about the same time the Mycenaeans were first appearing on the scene in mainland Greece at centers like Mycenae and Pylos. But there is no possible connection between the Hyksos and the earliest Greeks—ethnically completely different, as well as culturally and linguistically.

another well known fortification at that time is Tiryns , which to me is also similar to the name tyrians, and could have some connection to the people that were left behind , i think Apols post says that Ahmose only pressed forward to Byblos , so although the records say Ahmose completely extinguished the Hyksos , on many occasions the writers of British history Geoffrey of Monmouth or Wace/Layamon etc say that either the british , or the scots or the saxons are completely anihilated , but then in the next battle they are miraculously resurected , and appear in their thousands to rally again.

is it not a puzzle that at the same time the hyksos are vanishing from history , whilst probably fleeing in the general direction of the hittites , that another people , the mycenaeans are magically appearing , and not more likely that the two events are somehow connected , even if it is not the hyksos that are entering greece , but a people pushed ahead out of their land by the fleeing hyksos.for a people to build cyclopian fortification in Mycenaea , pylos and Tiryns like they did , they must have learned their craft over many decades...............Egypt and its monumental building skills seems a strong possibility.

the reason i asked the tongue in cheek question whether Cecrops and Cyclops (cyclopian building works ) could be connected is not only with regard to this building skill ..... i also notice that in certain works on the language of the

mycenaens there seems to be an accepted letter exchange of "R" and "L"..... namely :-

the term king or ruler..MYC.. qa-si-Re-u (then later greek ) BasiLeus............an elite landowner.MYC.Ra-wa-ke-ta..

later GK..Lawagetas...........a leader of the people...te-Re-ta....GK...teLestai.........so if this R to L exchange was applied to

CecRops ,could it have produced CycLops.

R and L do not seem to always convert though MYC..governor of a district ko-re-te (? Curete ?or Curator ) as it seems the governors deputy was the MYC..po-ro-ko-re-te which probably became Procurator.

It's helpful to understand the origin of the name "Hyksos." It derived from the Greek tongue a very long after the Hyksos themselves had disappeared from history. It's a Greek corruption of the ancient Egyptian term HKA-xAswt (literally, "foreign rulers"). The origin of the Greek derivation is most like the Egyptian "historian" Manetho who lived in the early Ptolemaic Period, when Macedonian overlords ruled Egypt. But originally this ancient Egyptian term referred generically to any group of people who were foreign to Egypt. Probably around the time large influxes of Syro-Palestinians were migrating into Egypt (late in the Middle Kingdom and into the Second Intermediate Period), HKA-xAswt came especially to refer to Canaanites.

Analysis of Hyksos centers like Avaris helps to clarify who the bulk of the Hyksos population were. Based on their ceramics and other material culture, shrines, architecture, and burial customs, they were primarily southern Palestinians (Canaanites). Ahmose I wrested them from Avaris and out of the Delta and all the way into the Negev. One of his generals left an autobiographical account in which he described how the Hyksos took up refuge in a walled fortress in the Negev, where the Egyptians besieged them, stormed the city, and slaughtered the entire population. For all intents and purposes the Hyksos were extinct by the end of the sixteenth century BCE.

as the name of a people in northern Egypt extinct yes , but can we be sure the people were not using another name ,in another place ?

There is no connection with the Sea Peoples, who first appeared on the scene in the reign of Merneptah, in Dynasty 19, long after the time of Ahmose I. The Sea Peoples were a symptom or side effect of the collapse of the great Bronze Age civilizations throughout the eastern Mediterranean by around 1200 to 1100 BCE. Very different time, very different set of events and circumstances taking place then.

fair enough ..thanks for info Kmt

On a closing note, it's also helpful to know that the name Avaris is a much more recent derivation. That's not the site's ancient name. The Egyptians called the city Hwt-wrt.

thank again for info ... did not know the name Avaris came much later........wonder if the later commentators decided

to give it the name Avaris , because of the greed of the earlier occupants then ?? but then in the words of Abremelin word-fxxx could also make Avaris ..A..V..Ares or God-ov-War.....food for much thought and much more reading for me .

Edited by Passing Time
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We should also give some thought to the exact length of a foot among the ancient Frisians.

I once tried to discover the length of a 'houtvoet'. I do not think I ever found the answer. I seem to recall that just about every town or region or profession used its own definition of the length of a foot.

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The institution of girls' schools developed out of the extremely ancient "Modranekth."2 [2 "society of maidens"] [...]

The corps of maidens was organized in four groups, which are: The lowest group, the HEXAS [witches], had as their duty the care and preservation of the eternal flame and its kindling for purposes of signaling (by day with smoke, by night with a bright flame)[*]. Fire was fetched from these women as a part of certain ceremonies or ritual (Ara-Ryta] for the lighting the hearth-fire of newly married couples. As a part of land-taking or new settlement ceremonies, or when perhaps the hearth-fire had gone out, fire was kindled from live coals from these eternal fires. The Hexas were initiated into herbology in some tribes and communities in addition to their service relevan to the fire. [...]

The Dutch word for 'witch' is 'heks'. The etymological origin - which I did not know before - of 'heks' must be those HEXAS.

Modranekth. Can it be that there is an etymological relationship between this word and the islamic 'madrasa'?

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The Swedish 'föda' means food, to feed, to give birth. The Swedish 'dika' means to drain. The Swedish 'dike' means ditch.

I do not hold that these Swedish words are related to foddik - but it is something to keep in mind.

The word foddik is to be found in Montanus de Haan Hettema’s Frisian dictionary of 1832, where it sure enough is explained as ‘lamp’.Jan Gerhardus Ottema refers to pastor Johannes Müller Cadovius’ (1650-1725) book about the East Frisian language of Harlingerland. He writes that foddick is a lamp or a Krüsel (English: crucible), which could either mean ‘a heat-resistant vessel’ or ‘a hanging lamp’.

In the Tessel dialect – the language of Texel, where the lamp of the Folk-mother in fact burned, foddik or voddig is the same as Dutch voeding, meaning ‘food’, ‘fire’ or ‘nutriment’.Thus, the basis seems to be something that constantly need to be fed for being maintained – fed with combustible materials.

Edited by Apol
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... and just for the record, as mentioned much earlier in a previous thread, "photo" seems to have been derived from (or related to) foddik. (At least, that would make sense imo.)

Edited by Othar
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So, would they be more like the brochs or wheelhouses then?

As for the holy fire of Van Gorp and Passing Time, let's see what Austro-Hungarian officer Karl Maria Wiligut (1866-1946) had to say on his family traditions, writing in 1935:

The institution of girls' schools developed out of the extremely ancient "Modranekth."
2
[
2
"society of maidens"] [...] So, for example, it came about that virgins who were chosen as BURGMAIDENS had to conform special conditions. [...]

The corps of maidens was organized in four groups, which are: The lowest group, the HEXAS [witches], had as their duty the care and preservation of the eternal flame and its kindling for purposes of signaling (by day with smoke, by night with a bright flame)[*]. Fire was fetched from these women as a part of certain ceremonies or ritual (Ara-Ryta] for the lighting the hearth-fire of newly married couples. As a part of land-taking or new settlement ceremonies, or when perhaps the hearth-fire had gone out, fire was kindled from live coals from these eternal fires. The Hexas were initiated into herbology in some tribes and communities in addition to their service relevan to the fire. [...]

From this presentation of the basic division of the
Maidenschaft
it is clear what a deep meaning the position of women had in past times. In the clan she was the protector and irector of honor of men as well as women. In the tribe she was the representative of high idealistic flights of thought and the kindler of enthuasism for great aims in the interest of the tribe and folk. [...]

Closely connected to the cosmos, to the All and to God, and reflecting the rhytmic lwas of these in her soul, she was the bearer of the whole of our tradition in our prehistoric past. It was with this understanding that the education of the female youth was designed. [
The Secret King
, translated by Stephen Flowers, 2001.]

* Such signaling reminds not only of the beacon ligh houses for the sailors, but also of the Finnish hill fort system, where they were situated according to archeologists so that they could alarm each other by signal fire and smoke. This is seen in the story of Norwegian Saint Olaf, where he attacks Finnish coast called Balegard (as in English 'balefire' or Finnish palo 'fire'), yet the heathen Finns succesfully evade him by withdrawing to inland, and then after amassing their own forces make a counter-attack. This all means that they likely had a foreknowledge of the impeding raid, as the counter actions had been systematic and not haphazard or random in style. Thus also the Wiligut story of signal fire makes sense in the North European cultural context.

I don't know about you Scandinavians, but here in Finland we have this thing called joululyhty. In the primary school we all children made ones. While they nowadays are any lamps with small candles inside, the iconography of the German julleuchter (hearts, wheels, zigzag) is well known from folk wood art of all Nordic nations, including ours.

Brochs are very interesting examples of ancient tower building, and the word is even derived from the same root as burg. From Apollonia's description, the towers were only about twice as tall as their diameter, which resembles the general proportions of a typical broch. Thanks for the Wiligut quote, too. Do you have other quotes from any of his contemporaries that reference the OLB? I knew, of course, of his involvement with the revival of Irminism, but had considered him something of a rival to Wirth, who promoted the OLB.

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The word foddik is to be found in Montanus de Haan Hettema’s Frisian dictionary of 1832, where it sure enough is explained as ‘lamp’.Jan Gerhardus Ottema refers to pastor Johannes Müller Cadovius’ (1650-1725) book about the East Frisian language of Harlingerland. He writes that foddick is a lamp or a Krüsel (English: crucible), which could either mean ‘a heat-resistant vessel’ or ‘a hanging lamp’.

In the Tessel dialect – the language of Texel, where the lamp of the Folk-mother in fact burned, foddik or voddig is the same as Dutch voeding, meaning ‘food’, ‘fire’ or ‘nutriment’.Thus, the basis seems to be something that constantly need to be fed for being maintained – fed with combustible materials.

It's similar to the English word "fodder", which also means food, specifically, food given to animals (at least in its modern usage).

Edited by Tony S.
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Do you have other quotes from any of his contemporaries that reference the OLB?

A well known contemporary referred to Wralda (quoted in various spellings) on several occasions (translated from German and selfsensored to avoid ban):

"Who observes and understands the process of selection in nature, is at the core a believer (in a higher power). He is a believer, because he knows there is an endlessly wise sovereignty above us. The ancient Germans had a beautiful expression for that: Waralda; the most ancient." (date unknown)

"Atheism is the only world, or religious view that is not tolerated within the [censored] [...] I have not tolerated an atheist in the ranks of the [censored]. Every member has a deep faith in God, in what my ancestors called in their language Waralda, the ancient one, the one who is mightier than we are." (date unknown)

(1942): "Today at [censored] funeral I intentionally expressed in my oration from my deepest conviction a belief in God, a belief in fate, in the ancient one as I called him - that is the old Germanic word: Wralda."

(1943): "... above us is an infinite wisdom. The Teutons had a beautiful expression for it: Waralda, the ancient. We may dispute how it can be revered and how in earthly terms it can be broken down into cults and varieties."

(1945): "The Most-Ancient ("Uralte") will protect us and particularly the brave/ good German people, and not let us perish."

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A well known contemporary referred to Wralda (quoted in various spellings) on several occasions (translated from German and selfsensored to avoid ban):

"Who observes and understands the process of selection in nature, is at the core a believer (in a higher power). He is a believer, because he knows there is an endlessly wise sovereignty above us. The ancient Germans had a beautiful expression for that: Waralda; the most ancient." (date unknown)

"Atheism is the only world, or religious view that is not tolerated within the [censored] [...] I have not tolerated an atheist in the ranks of the [censored]. Every member has a deep faith in God, in what my ancestors called in their language Waralda, the ancient one, the one who is mightier than we are." (date unknown)

(1942): "Today at [censored] funeral I intentionally expressed in my oration from my deepest conviction a belief in God, a belief in fate, in the ancient one as I called him - that is the old Germanic word: Wralda."

(1943): "... above us is an infinite wisdom. The Teutons had a beautiful expression for it: Waralda, the ancient. We may dispute how it can be revered and how in earthly terms it can be broken down into cults and varieties."

(1945): "The Most-Ancient ("Uralte") will protect us and particularly the brave/ good German people, and not let us perish."

I know who you mean, but didn't realise his name was not allowed to be mentioned! It is well-known, of course, that he was closely associated with both Wirth and Wiligut, at least for a time, though in both cases this association later became somewhat less close. In addition to the above quotes, what else do we know about him that justifies the assertion that is sometimes given that the OLB was his "bible"? We could, for example, cite the Julleuchter, which he strongly promoted, with its very obvious Jol symbol and name.

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I prefer salt ally (mercenary). It is closer to the OLB original.

But is it also closer to the right etymology?

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It's similar to the English word "fodder", which also means food, specifically, food given to animals (at least in its modern usage).

Therefore broadening it out , is it therefore related to to the jerusalem temple making sacrifice of animals on the sacred fire ,in feeding the flame , are they somehow feeding the God , or does the flame become more intense with the use of animal fats , ......

Edited by Passing Time
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The evidence for the former existence of Fryasburch is in the road layout at Den Burg (aerial view below). Any bricks or other rubble may lie under centuries of later building, and be inaccessible. It is interesting, however, how Frisian design might have changed and evolved over the milliennia, from the open stone circles of the Neolithic, to the later closed structures of the Bronze and Iron Ages, built of less durable material such as brick or wood.

Luchtfoto_van_de_kern_van_Den_Burg_vanuit_het_noordwesten_-_Burg,_Den_(Texel)_-_20045787_-_RCE.jpg

Nothing dating from the age of the Fryans has been found here.

And, btw, brick is not 'less durable': the Sumerians built their temples from brick, 5000 years ago. And how do we know they did? Because we've found remnants made of brick.

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Nothing dating from the age of the Fryans has been found here.

And, btw, brick is not 'less durable': the Sumerians built their temples from brick, 5000 years ago. And how do we know they did? Because we've found remnants made of brick.

It's less durable than stone. The Sumerian structures are little more than heaps of rubble today, unlike, say, the pyramids. Many archaeological sites are inaccessible due to later houses and other buildings, which might be the case with Den Burg.

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It's less durable than stone. The Sumerian structures are little more than heaps of rubble today, unlike, say, the pyramids. Many archaeological sites are inaccessible due to later houses and other buildings, which might be the case with Den Burg.

That's nonsense. Archeologists digged down deep below present day buildings in Den Burg, Texel, and found nothing confirming anything 2200 BCE or earlier.

-

Sumerian structures may be ruble now, but they are still there. And that's how we know of them

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That's nonsense. Archeologists digged down deep below present day buildings in Den Burg, Texel, and found nothing confirming anything 2200 BCE or earlier.

-

Sumerian structures may be ruble now, but they are still there. And that's how we know of them

Even today, just in the past few weeks, archaeologists have discovered traces of another circle near Stonehenge, an area that has been examined very closely for 150 years. Never rule out the possibility that evidence is lurking beneath the soil somewhere.

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Even today, just in the past few weeks, archaeologists have discovered traces of another circle near Stonehenge, an area that has been examined very closely for 150 years. Never rule out the possibility that evidence is lurking beneath the soil somewhere.

Let me tell you this: the Den Burg structure is as old as the earliest Viking raids.

Why? Because the people living there built these structures to defend themselves against these raids.

And may I remind you of a find in Germany, some years ago? They discovered a culture/civilization that dated from 4600 to 4400 BCE, a people who built gigantic structures 2000 years before the Egyptian pyramids, and no one knows what happened to these people.

But did we find any uniform culture - ALL ACROSS EUROPE - that dates from 2200 BCE or earlier? No.

Did we find any ancient inscription that remotely resembled the OLB srcipt? No, we never did.

But we did find 2000 years old Roman/latin inscriptions on wooden tablets in Friesland (yes!), and we did find almost 2000 years old runes on wood and bone in Denmark? (yes!).

Does the language used in these runes even remotely resemble the OLB language. No.

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The word foddik is to be found in Montanus de Haan Hettema’s Frisian dictionary of 1832, where it sure enough is explained as ‘lamp’.Jan Gerhardus Ottema refers to pastor Johannes Müller Cadovius’ (1650-1725) book about the East Frisian language of Harlingerland. He writes that foddick is a lamp or a Krüsel (English: crucible), which could either mean ‘a heat-resistant vessel’ or ‘a hanging lamp’.

In the Tessel dialect – the language of Texel, where the lamp of the Folk-mother in fact burned, foddik or voddig is the same as Dutch voeding, meaning ‘food’, ‘fire’ or ‘nutriment’.Thus, the basis seems to be something that constantly need to be fed for being maintained – fed with combustible materials.

It has occurred to me that -dik may be related to the Latin dicere (to say). Foddik then might mean 'to bring forth speech'.

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But is it also closer to the right etymology?

Van Gorp said: "For me the consensus goes as far as Salt-Athe carries the litteral meaning of Salt and Friend, and sounds as a version of "soldaat" (Dutch for soldier)".

I do not agree with him that it sounds like soldaat. I suspect that that is folk etymology. I am satisfied that soldaat / soldier is derived from solidus and that solidus in turn is related to salt.

I seem to recall that some-one else asserted that athe ought not to be translated as 'friend', but as 'ally', and his argument made sense to me. So salt-athe in my opinion means 'ally paid for with salt': a mercenary.

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Do you have other quotes from any of his contemporaries that reference the OLB?
No, unfortunately. Have you read Stephen Flower's English translation published in 2001? If you have not, please do. In my humble opinion, OLB addicts out here should check the Wiligut stuff, too!

While the Wiligut stuff has thematic similarities to OLB, the overwhelming majority of the content is very different in nature. Same words more or less describe also the link between the Wiligut and Boxström family sagas: similar, but not an exact match. There is a very good reason to believe, that at least the connection between the two later sources may not have been due to purposeful copying, for there existed a significant time gap of 17 years between their availability here in Finland. And frankly, I doubt that the Wiligut stuff was much known before the 2000s or Internet in the West Europe, either. While the name and personality of mr. Wiligut perhaps were, along with the Wewelsburg castle, the pre-historic contents of his writings and articles do not seem to have been well known at all.

(Of course, if somebody here already read books about this stuff in the 1980s, 1970s or 1960s, please do tell us about it! For I do not recall Trevor Ravenscroft's 1973 book The Spear of Destiny to have dealt with the Wiligut stuff, either.)

Edited by FromFinland
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... what else do we know about him that justifies the assertion that is sometimes given that the OLB was his "bible"?

At least that

1) he had the OLB secretely researched until 1943 and

2) that in 1942 he had planned to have a splendor-edition made to give to his "leader" as a present, but this was cancelled after the latter had made a speech that was not favorable of things related to Atlantis research.

(I can be more specific tomorrow, when I am in my library.)

A German emeritus scholar who collected almost all there is to collect about this, offered to share his sources with me, but I won't have time to indulge in them in the near future.

I also know now that one of the main reasons to publicly reject OLB as authentic in '34 was, that it was politically inconvenient, because it would suggest that "Slavic" peoples had already since ancient times lived in areas that they wanted to claim for Germanics. This would have been enough reason to delay admitting authenticity till after the war.

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that in 1942 he had planned to have a splendor-edition made to give to his "leader" as a present, but this was cancelled after the latter had made a speech that was not favorable of things related to Atlantis research. [...] I also know now that one of the main reasons to publicly reject OLB as authentic in '34 was, that it was politically inconvenient, because it would suggest that "Slavic" peoples had already since ancient times lived in areas that they wanted to claim for Germanics. This would have been enough reason to delay admitting authenticity till after the war.

I'm aware of this anonymous "leader" having made a public speech where he riciduled all those looking for ancient Germanic things for guidance. To my knowledge, this "leader" was of a future-oriented type, and for him the ancient pre-history had been a springboard to modern times, not a great thing in itself. He for example considered the Greco-Roman influence in the arts an integral part of modern European identity, which could indeed be seen very well in the WW2 architecture of the "must-not-be-named"-land.

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No, unfortunately. Have you read Stephen Flower's English translation published in 2001? If you have not, please do. In my humble opinion, OLB addicts out here should check the Wiligut stuff, too!

While the Wiligut stuff has thematic similarities to OLB, the overwhelming majority of the content is very different in nature. Same words more or less describe also the link between the Wiligut and Boxström family sagas: similar, but not an exact match. There is a very good reason to believe, that at least the connection between the two later sources may not have been due to purposeful copying, for there existed a significant time gap of 17 years between their availability here in Finland. And frankly, I doubt that the Wiligut stuff was much known before the 2000s or Internet in the West Europe, either. While the name and personality of mr. Wiligut perhaps were, along with the Wewelsburg castle, the pre-historic contents of his writings and articles do not seem to have been well known at all.

(Of course, if somebody here already read books about this stuff in the 1980s, 1970s or 1960s, please do tell us about it! For I do not recall Trevor Ravenscroft's 1973 book The Spear of Destiny to have dealt with the Wiligut stuff, either.)

Hi FF.

are you talking about fire and ice ?

have you got a title for the wiligut book/s , and are they available in english ?

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At least that

1) he had the OLB secretely researched until 1943 and

2) that in 1942 he had planned to have a splendor-edition made to give to his "leader" as a present, but this was cancelled after the latter had made a speech that was not favorable of things related to Atlantis research.

(I can be more specific tomorrow, when I am in my library.)

A German emeritus scholar who collected almost all there is to collect about this, offered to share his sources with me, but I won't have time to indulge in them in the near future.

I also know now that one of the main reasons to publicly reject OLB as authentic in '34 was, that it was politically inconvenient, because it would suggest that "Slavic" peoples had already since ancient times lived in areas that they wanted to claim for Germanics. This would have been enough reason to delay admitting authenticity till after the war.

Othar, check out Jutta Rudiger. It's very odd that no one has set up some sort of party or movement to implement the OLB in modern times.

On a completely unrelated note, please feel free to have a look at my website in my sig, which has many of my own historical interpretations as outlined in my two published books on the subject. Anyone may e-mail me from it too, if they wish to contact me directly.

Edited by Tony S.
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