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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 3]


Abramelin
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The word foddik is to be found in Montanus de Haan Hettema’s Frisian dictionary of 1832, where it sure enough is explained as ‘lamp’.Jan Gerhardus Ottema refers to pastor Johannes Müller Cadovius’ (1650-1725) book about the East Frisian language of Harlingerland. He writes that foddick is a lamp or a Krüsel (English: crucible), which could either mean ‘a heat-resistant vessel’ or ‘a hanging lamp’.

In the Tessel dialect – the language of Texel, where the lamp of the Folk-mother in fact burned, foddik or voddig is the same as Dutch voeding, meaning ‘food’, ‘fire’ or ‘nutriment’.Thus, the basis seems to be something that constantly need to be fed for being maintained – fed with combustible materials.

foddich (voddig), like a 'vod' : http://www.wnt.inl.nl/iWDB/search?wdb=WFT&actie=article&uitvoer=HTML&id=28528

Though voddig for voeding is also relevant in meaning for a fire.

Do you have more reference for that?

What makes me wonder (doubt) is that there is so little to none mentionning the actual care for that permanent nourishment of the foddik.

If i'm right OLB doesn't care to mention by what it is fuelled.

If the continous feeding is the base and core of the foddik, i would think that being emphasised somewhere in the narratives about the lamp.

But it's more the protection of the flame itself that receives all the attention.

When you look at vod (rag) as base, you have also a direct link with 'lump' (what hangs down, 'lompen' is another word for rags) and hence 'lamp'.

A typical feature of oillamps was the relative long sustainability to keep the fire burning why it was choosen.

So i like the connection with the feeding also, but prefer the connection between lump/lamp voddig/foddik ;-)

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foddich (voddig), like a 'vod' : http://www.wnt.inl.n...r=HTML&id=28528

Though voddig for voeding is also relevant in meaning for a fire.

Do you have more reference for that?

What makes me wonder (doubt) is that there is so little to none mentionning the actual care for that permanent nourishment of the foddik.

If i'm right OLB doesn't care to mention by what it is fuelled.

If the continous feeding is the base and core of the foddik, i would think that being emphasised somewhere in the narratives about the lamp.

But it's more the protection of the flame itself that receives all the attention.

When you look at vod (rag) as base, you have also a direct link with 'lump' (what hangs down, 'lompen' is another word for rags) and hence 'lamp'.

A typical feature of oillamps was the relative long sustainability to keep the fire burning why it was choosen.

So i like the connection with the feeding also, but prefer the connection between lump/lamp voddig/foddik ;-)

Maybe they used Amber to fuel the lamps ?

it says somewhere others used amber for perfume , some for jewellery , but the norse used

to burn it ... i dont know if i dreamt it , but i have looked everywhere i can think of to find it

again... without success ..... but i am sure i read somewhere they used to soften amber by

fire , then beat or press it out to make a form of glass .and the tar it formed after burning

they used as ink .

Edited by Passing Time
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foddich (voddig), like a 'vod' : http://www.wnt.inl.n...r=HTML&id=28528

Though voddig for voeding is also relevant in meaning for a fire.

Do you have more reference for that?

What makes me wonder (doubt) is that there is so little to none mentionning the actual care for that permanent nourishment of the foddik.

If i'm right OLB doesn't care to mention by what it is fuelled.

Here are the references I mentioned:

Montanus de Haan Hettema: Proeve van een Friesch en Nederlandsch woordenboek (L. Schierbeek, Leeuwarden, 1832) p. 27

https://books.google...epage&q&f=false

Johannes Cadovius Müller: Memoriale Linguae Frisicae (c. 1690 / W. J. Leendertz, Leer, 1875 / Nischkowsky, Breslau, 1909 / Diedrich Soltau’s Verlag, Norden, 1911)

https://archive.org/...ingua00jevegoog (pp. 110, 44, 52, 53)

De Internationale Etymologische Taal Sleutel

http://www.taalsleut...alle_talen1.php

I have changed my mind again regarding the foddik being an oil lamp. I think it was rather a coal fire:

http://oeralindabook.com/lamp

Edited by Apol
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I agree with PT.

It might have been fuelled by amber, burn stone.

Pytheas says that the Gutones, a people of Germany, inhabit the shores of an estuary of the Ocean called Mentonomon, their territory extending a distance of six thousand stadia; that, at one day's sail from this territory, is the Isle of Abalus, upon the shores of which, amber is thrown up by the waves in spring, it being an excretion of the sea in a concrete form; as, also, that the inhabitants use this amber by way of fuel, and sell it to their neighbors, the Teutones.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amber

The OLB mentions a few times that amber is a Fryan resource, makes sense to me that it was the fuel for the lamp.

Edited by The Puzzler
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That's a really good diagram. I would have to say, though, that I think the flat sides of the tower face the long houses. Apollonia's text says the houses are "on either side" of the tower. Therefore, one side of the tower faces north, and another faces south, for example. The houses probably join the tower without a gap, since the "form of the Jol" has no gaps in the centre. In other words, on its ground floor the tower has no exposed wall, and the only way in is through the long houses (though they may have entrances near the tower, of course).

The reason why I think that the houses didn't run from the flat surfaces of the tower, is this:

Up on the south wall is the Text inscribed. On the right side of this one finds the First Doctrine, on the left side the Laws. The other things one finds on the other three
(p. 107).

If people should be able to read the texts, the houses couldn't be placed like that, unless there was a platform on top of the houses going all the way around the tower - which of course may have been the case. The reason why I haven't connected the houses to the wall of the tower, is of practical reasons. People would need to make walks to the other side of the houses without being forced to go through them. But, at the same time, the ancient houses had often passages. This example is a farmhouse, where people lived in one part and the animals in the other:

http://commons.wikim...d_boerderij.jpg

Edited by Apol
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I agree with PT.

It might have been fuelled by amber, burn stone.

Pytheas says that the Gutones, a people of Germany, inhabit the shores of an estuary of the Ocean called Mentonomon, their territory extending a distance of six thousand stadia; that, at one day's sail from this territory, is the Isle of Abalus, upon the shores of which, amber is thrown up by the waves in spring, it being an excretion of the sea in a concrete form; as, also, that the inhabitants use this amber by way of fuel, and sell it to their neighbors, the Teutones.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amber

The OLB mentions a few times that amber is a Fryan resource, makes sense to me that it was the fuel for the lamp.

The Gutones were almost certainly the Jutes, of Jutland, and jute is another word for amber. The Jutes, of course, are called the Juttar in the OLB. They later migrated to England and settled in Kent, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight.

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The reason why I think that the houses didn't run from the flat surfaces of the tower, is this:

Up on the south wall is the Text inscribed. On the right side of this one finds the First Doctrine, on the left side the Laws. The other things one finds on the other three
(p. 107).

If people should be able to read the texts, the houses couldn't be placed like that, unless there was a platform on top of the houses going all the way around the tower - which of course may have been the case. The reason why I haven't connected the houses to the wall of the tower, is of practical reasons. People would need to make walks to the other side of the houses without being forced to go through them. But, at the same time, the ancient houses had often passages. This example is a farmhouse, where people lived in one part and the animals in the other:

http://commons.wikim...d_boerderij.jpg

The inscriptions may have been on the inside walls. This would make sense, I think, since the lamp was also inside.

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are you talking about fire and ice ?
Sorry, no idea what you're referring into. The only "Fire and Ice" I'm aware of is a 1980s fantasy animation movie.
have you got a title for the wiligut book/s , and are they available in english?

Sure! The Secret King, Karl Maria Wiligut, Himmler's Lord of Runes. Translated by Stephen E. Flowers. Published by Dominion / Rûna-Raven, 2001.

As per the page 99, mr. Wiligut claimed that his family story were allegedly carved in wooden boards in "linear script", which along with other family documents perished in a 1848 fire in Ofen, or Buda today.

Some parts of the Wiligut story seem to be influenced Christian and later historical times, which I also myself see in the the Boxtröm family saga. This is not at all odd, for Germanic Christianity has roots stretching to the antiquity. The 2001 book is important also for the 1997 interview of the Gabriele Winkler-Dechend, which it contains. Lady Winkler-Dechend (1908-?) knew mr. Wiligut personally and in addition to providing some additional information also shoots down some unfounded rumours, such as that mr. Wiligut allegedly had some parapsychological abilities.

Also this is a good place to inform the English readeship here, that Ior Bock of the Boxström saga fame was asked in 2010 whether he was aware of the Wiligut story, for it contains few peculiar similarities. The answer was no, which is to my mind believable, based on what we know both of mr. Bock's reading habits and his interests in general.

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Playing around with FODDIK...

Fod as foot - Danish fod, - since Denmark was lost to them, Fryan imo also contains fragments of the language - verb; "make a footing or foundation." http://etymonline.com/index.php?term=foot

dik as diger 1, digere, dig-er, dig-er-e, afries., Adj.: nhd. sorgfältig, genau; ne. diligent; Vw.: s. -hê-d, -lik; Hw.: vgl. got. *digrs, an. digr; Q.: Jur, AA 171; E.: germ. *digra-, *digraz, Adj., weich, dick, voll; s. idg. *dʰeig̑ʰ-, V., kneten, formen, mauern, Pokorny 244; L.: Hh 16a, Hh 154, Rh 686b, AA 171

digere, dig-er-e, afries., Adj.: Vw.: s. dig-er

digerhêd 1, dig-er-hê-d, afries., st. F. (i): nhd. Treue, Sorgfalt; ne. diligence; Hw.: vgl. mnd. dēgerhêit; Q.: Jur, AA 171; E.: s. dig-er, *hê-d; L.: Hh 16a, Rh 686b, AA 171

digerlik***, dig-er-lik***, afries., Adj.: nhd. treu, sorgsam, genau; ne. true, exact (Adj.)

Gives an interesting context of this oh so sacred 'true, eternal foundation' flame - remember Ulysses needs to light the lamp from it, only new cities and towns could be successful with this type of flame in general, even down to Roman times and probably later, if it went out, doom was sure to befall you.

Edited by The Puzzler
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The inscriptions may have been on the inside walls. This would make sense, I think, since the lamp was also inside.

Yes, reconsidering what I wrote, I think you are right. Freyja's Text must have been on the inside of the tower. The houses must also have run from the flat surfaces of the walls; the reason for that is that the side of the tower where the Text was written, was facing south, where there was also a house. I have to correct my image of the burgh of Ljudgârda.

Whether the houses were connected to the walls, or not, is an open question. Maybe they were, because then the femmes could walk into the tower without being forced to go outside.

The lamp was in the tower, but that doesn't mean that it was enclosed within walls. And maybe it was fueled with amber - we don't know. But as amber was called bärnsten ('bernstein'), and 'The Puzzler' says that amber was used as fuel (in the Baltics, though), it might be so. The lamps in Greece and Italy were for sure not fueled with amber, because in the Mediterranean countries amber was considered more valuable than gold - and even more valuable than silver. It was a big trade of amber from the Baltics to the Mediterranean in ancient times.

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the inhabitants use this amber by way of fuel, and sell it to their neighbors, the Teutones.

It is logistically impossible for amber to serve as fuel if the ocean yields it is such quantities as to be even sold to another people.

I rather suspect that this 'amber' in fact was sea-weed.

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The Gutones were almost certainly the Jutes, of Jutland, and jute is another word for amber. The Jutes, of course, are called the Juttar in the OLB. They later migrated to England and settled in Kent, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight.

In traditional Finnish, juutti means 'a Dane'. Pages 53-54 of J.R.R. Tolkien's Finn and Hengest (HarperCollins 1990) tell it could be also written eotena or eoten. Kristfrid Ganander, writing in 1789, has the Joter refer to Finns of the olden days. For more information, please see Fornjót, Oium, Reidgotaland, Jordanes and - interestingly - Gutians.
please feel free to have a look at my website in my sig
Tony, your website has been helpful for me when I study the OLB. I like very much that you have not only put up the text online over there, but have also put some though on the visuals (maps, fonts, colours) as well. Its great we have not just one, but many sites (yours, Apol's, Othar's, Abramelin's) that look at OLB from different points of view. And if one of them goes offline for reason or another, we still have the information available on somebody's website. Unfortunately this is not at all the case with many other sources.

I have this pipe dream, that maybe someday we Europeans would have one website portal to a database, that would include all such sources plus Tacitus, Caesar, Monmouth, sagas etc. in an easy to use web interface, where one could see the original and the English translations side by side. This would be of great help for students, hobbyists, professional researchers and all. It would also include such texts that may or may not be modern fabrications (like Hrafnagaldur Ódins, Book of Veles, Kolbrin bible etc.), for one man's forgery is another's Bible, and we should not limit information flow, just because of what we think to be authentic. The largest obstacles is see now are possible copyright issues, which is a shame as in the old European culture sharing is caring was very much the normal attitude in research and studies.

Edited by FromFinland
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Here is a corrected map of the burg of Ljudgârda:

ljudgârda B

Edited by Apol
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The largest obstacles is see now are possible copyright issues, which is a shame as in the old European culture sharing is caring was very much the normal attitude in research and studies.

Indeed, in a healthy culture, where honor is valued higher than material possessions, it would be no obstacle. If many people like someones work so much, that they make use of it, this raises his honor and increases his immortality.

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Yes, reconsidering what I wrote, I think you are right. Freyja's Text must have been on the inside of the tower. The houses must also have run from the flat surfaces of the walls; the reason for that is that the side of the tower where the Text was written, was facing south, where there was also a house. I have to correct my image of the burgh of Ljudgârda.

Whether the houses were connected to the walls, or not, is an open question. Maybe they were, because then the femmes could walk into the tower without being forced to go outside.

The lamp was in the tower, but that doesn't mean that it was enclosed within walls. And maybe it was fueled with amber - we don't know. But as amber was called bärnsten ('bernstein'), and 'The Puzzler' says that amber was used as fuel (in the Baltics, though), it might be so. The lamps in Greece and Italy were for sure not fueled with amber, because in the Mediterranean countries amber was considered more valuable than gold - and even more valuable than silver. It was a big trade of amber from the Baltics to the Mediterranean in ancient times.

A very nice diagram. Much better that Wirth's, which is frankly a mess. The issue of whether the tower walls are joined to the houses, while not directly addressed by Apollonia, can perhaps be considered through analogy. She says that the entire burch was in the form of the Jol, which to my mind at least, implies no break or gap, but a single, six-spoked stucture. Also, from a practical consideration, as a defensive building, it would make a lot more sense for the houses to be joined to the tower.

I like the idea that the lamps were fuelled by amber, though admittedly it has no textual support in the OLB. Is amber actually any good as a fuel, compared to, say, wood or wax?

Edited by Tony S.
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In traditional Finnish, juutti means 'a Dane'. Pages 53-54 of J.R.R. Tolkien's Finn and Hengest (HarperCollins 1990) tell it could be also written eotena or eoten. Kristfrid Ganander, writing in 1789, has the Joter refer to Finns of the olden days. For more information, please see Fornjót, Oium, Reidgotaland, Jordanes and - interestingly - Gutians.

Tony, your website has been helpful for me when I study the OLB. I like very much that you have not only put up the text online over there, but have also put some though on the visuals (maps, fonts, colours) as well. Its great we have not just one, but many sites (yours, Apol's, Othar's, Abramelin's) that look at OLB from different points of view. And if one of them goes offline for reason or another, we still have the information available on somebody's website. Unfortunately this is not at all the case with many other sources.

I have this pipe dream, that maybe someday we Europeans would have one website portal to a database, that would include all such sources plus Tacitus, Caesar, Monmouth, sagas etc. in an easy to use web interface, where one could see the original and the English translations side by side. This would be of great help for students, hobbyists, professional researchers and all. It would also include such texts that may or may not be modern fabrications (like Hrafnagaldur Ódins, Book of Veles, Kolbrin bible etc.), for one man's forgery is another's Bible, and we should not limit information flow, just because of what we think to be authentic. The largest obstacles is see now are possible copyright issues, which is a shame as in the old European culture sharing is caring was very much the normal attitude in research and studies.

Thank you. Yes, I fully agree that such a website, and open sharing, would be a very good idea.

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Here is a corrected map of the burg of Ljudgârda:

If I had a few million to spare I'd build one. Exactly as described. I imagine that's a dream a lot of us here might share.

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The Gutones were almost certainly the Jutes, of Jutland, and jute is another word for amber. The Jutes, of course, are called the Juttar in the OLB. They later migrated to England and settled in Kent, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight.

I was born in Den Helder. I am both a krabbetukker and a jutter; it's my heritage - even though I have never done so in actual life.

Jutten means to collect useful items that the sea has deposited on the shore. So I know, in my bones, that the Jutes collected such items provided to them by the sea: wood, sea-weed, anything that floats, perchance food, perchance amber, perchance amber-gris.

I still think that the 'amber' they collected in fact was sea-weed.

Edited by Ell
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I was born in Den Helder. I am both a krabbetukker and a jutter; it's my heritage - even though I have never done so in actual life.

Jutten means to collect useful items that the sea has deposited on the shore. So I know, in my bones, that the Jutes collected such items provided to them by the sea: wood, sea-weed, anything that floats, perchance food, perchance amber, perchance amber-gris.

I still think that the 'amber' they collected in fact was sea-weed.

The term jute can indeed refer to a type of fibre, but not specifically seaweed, though.

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The term jute can indeed refer to a type of fibre, but not specifically seaweed, though.

Of course I also considered the term 'jute', but I saw no relationship with the verb 'jutten'. So I do not think that jute has anything to do with jutland.

According to

M. Philippa e.a. (2003-2009) Etymologisch Woordenboek van het Nederlands 'jute' is from the English 'jute', which itself comes from a Benghal word.

Edited by Ell
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How should we envisage the roofs on the houses in the burch? Apollonia tells us that they are round, so in the absense of any further information I imagine a simple semi-circle in shape. Not counting the roofs, the houses are 21 feet high (and wide). If the roof is a semi-circle, this adds a further 10½ feet, making the houses 31½ feet tall at their highest points. This is more than a third of the height of the tower. Apollonia also seems to imply that the roofs are made of brick, like the rest of the structure. Within the houses, there would certainly be enough room for a ground floor and an upper floor, plus a loft in the roof, making three floors in total, though we are not actually told if this is the case. Perhaps, like medieval brick barns, they were open plan, with a single, very large room inside.

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Why not?

"On either side of the tower is a house three hundred feet long, and twenty-one feet broad, and twenty-one feet high, besides the roof, which is round." (Sandbach)

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Here are the references I mentioned:

Montanus de Haan Hettema: Proeve van een Friesch en Nederlandsch woordenboek (L. Schierbeek, Leeuwarden, 1832) p. 27

https://books.google...epage&q&f=false

Johannes Cadovius Müller: Memoriale Linguae Frisicae (c. 1690 / W. J. Leendertz, Leer, 1875 / Nischkowsky, Breslau, 1909 / Diedrich Soltau’s Verlag, Norden, 1911)

https://archive.org/...ingua00jevegoog (pp. 110, 44, 52, 53)

De Internationale Etymologische Taal Sleutel

http://www.taalsleut...alle_talen1.php

I have changed my mind again regarding the foddik being an oil lamp. I think it was rather a coal fire:

http://oeralindabook.com/lamp

Thanks for the clear references, if i understand correctly the reference for voddig as voeding and base for foddik comes from the 'taalsleutel' site.

Being

Woord

foddik (oudfries)

Intertaal

foch-t-te-chich

Bewerking

voed-te-zich

Uitkomst

voedt zichzelf

Tessels

voeding-voeding

Overige info

altijd brandende lamp

To be honest, I don't feel yet i get the total understanding of all 'intertaal' and 'bewerking' derivations on the site and on what it is actually based.

Though i know the site and find it interesting to look sometimes.

Even if the "voed-te-zich" explanation is purely the author's personal insight i respect that. I have my own too.

Personally i still don't see any reason to think the foddik was based on something different then a kind of oil lamp with rags as a wick, because that was the most used/known ancient method to keep a (even fade, mind the word fade) light burning as long as possible, with less effort (feeding substance) as possible.

Surely because general frisian 'foddig' is just 'voddig' pointing to the rag element, what imo makes entirely sence on its own when talking also about ancient oil lamps using rags as wick to keep it burning. But i leave it hear for the moment, maybe i will still switch thoughts about this later on.

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Sorry, no idea what you're referring into. The only "Fire and Ice" I'm aware of is a 1980s fantasy animation movie.

Sure! The Secret King, Karl Maria Wiligut, Himmler's Lord of Runes. Translated by Stephen E. Flowers. Published by Dominion / Rûna-Raven, 2001.

I wondered if you were referencing the book by Stephen E Flowers....Fire and Ice....about the Brotherhood of Saturn

thanks for the other info .

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