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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 3]


Abramelin
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I agree with PT.

It might have been fuelled by amber, burn stone.

Pytheas says that the Gutones, a people of Germany, inhabit the shores of an estuary of the Ocean called Mentonomon, their territory extending a distance of six thousand stadia; that, at one day's sail from this territory, is the Isle of Abalus, upon the shores of which, amber is thrown up by the waves in spring, it being an excretion of the sea in a concrete form; as, also, that the inhabitants use this amber by way of fuel, and sell it to their neighbors, the Teutones.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amber

The OLB mentions a few times that amber is a Fryan resource, makes sense to me that it was the fuel for the lamp.

Also in most places of religion where Gods are worshipped , the priests also used incence ,or sweet smelling myrrh etc

amber would also serve this purpose when burned.

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Both PT and Puzzler, please enlighten me why you are looking for another substance than oil-based wick lamps?

Is it too obvious? ;-)

Kidding, i just don't get that.

Pallas Athena was walking with an oil lamp, the Callimachus lamp (burning a full year with just one fill of oil) was oil based with wick of indestructible flax (flax was base for linnen vodden). Still others ...

https://books.google...us lamp&f=false

https://books.google...an flax&f=false

-----------------

edit:

If we want to meet in the middle, we can say there is a kind of wolly 'stone' (asbestos) involved but to make the wick?

https://books.google.be/books?id=v7WYtNDTU2IC&pg=PA133&lpg=PA133&dq=flax+asbestos&source=bl&ots=yynwF1cVLt&sig=blg7Ot1JcZ0IpSACAOC2FtYAdJc&hl=nl&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi-pf-__MrKAhVJbxQKHcTPC-MQ6AEIJzAB#v=onepage&q=flax%20asbestos&f=false

Edited by Van Gorp
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Both PT and Puzzler, please enlighten me why you are looking for another substance than oil-based wick lamps?

Is it too obvious? ;-)

Kidding, i just don't get that.

I am not looking for another substance , read the link to amber that Puz gave , without reading it again , it says something like if you heat amber to 200 degrees, it softens and forms an oil , there is your oil for the oil lamp , it also gives off a pleasant smell of pine incense , the fumes also have healing properties , why use any old oil when you have amber in profusion , 3 useful qualities for the mother to use in her lamp in her bedrum... sorry their prayer space .

it also mentions something about it being called a name like glass , and being softened and pressed ,......( possibly to make sheets , maybe small panes of glass for windows ,) and it mentions that when heated , there are other oils you can add to it which take out imperfections , and make it clearer. ......that is a good link from puz.. worth reading.

just as an aside there is an indian goddess called Amba , also known as Durga , Parvati , Sati and Kali.

as Durga she is Goddess of power and strength.........as Parvati , the serene wife of Lord Shiva .(the Jats are said to have been born from Lord Shiva's Locks....whatever that might mean )

As Sati the daughter of King Daksha ........and as Kali the destroyer(Kali Meteor ?)

Edited by Passing Time
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I am not looking for another substance , read the link to amber that Puz gave , without reading it again , it says something like if you heat amber to 200 degrees, it softens and forms an oil , there is your oil for the oil lamp , it also gives off a pleasant smell of pine incense , the fumes also have healing properties , why use any old oil when you have amber in profusion , 3 useful qualities for the mother to use in her lamp in her bedrum... sorry their prayer space .

it also mentions something about it being called a name like glass , and being softened and pressed ,......( possibly to make sheets , maybe small panes of glass for windows ,) and it mentions that when heated , there are other oils you can add to it which take out imperfections , and make it clearer. ......that is a good link from puz.. worth reading.

just as an aside there is an indian goddess called Amba , also known as Durga , Parvati , Sati and Kali.

as Durga she is Goddess of power and strength.........as Parvati , the serene wife of Lord Shiva .(the Jats are said to have been born from Lord Shiva's Locks....whatever that might mean )

As Sati the daughter of King Daksha ........and as Kali the destroyer(Kali Meteor ?)

Ok thanks for having the patience to spell it out slowly once more for me :) Indeed a very interesting link and insights.

Maybe a bit too fast, but i thought you and Puzzler were referring to amber as fuel in the 'stone' version (so actually burning the amberpiece as you would do with incense or coal).

But as i try to understand correctly now, you are more thinking of an oil-made version of amber, using a wick to keep the fire burning?

----------------------

edit:

In one of Apol's references (https://ia801407.us.archive.org/35/items/memorialelingua00jevegoog/memorialelingua00jevegoog.pdf) I saw a very interesting point.

p44, seef fiddick -> ein fluegel

Fiddick for wing (vleugel). If you take the wings of windmills for instance. These are called 'wiek' in Dutch, and a wiek is also the wick to keep the fire burning.

wiek zn. ‘vleugel; molenarm’; (BN) ‘kaarsenpit; tampon’ http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/wiek1

I'm convinced: the foddik (fiddick) is referring to a wick.

Edited by Van Gorp
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Your link about Asbestos....really interesting VG........wonder how many people the Magi fooled with the use of asbestos ?

throwing religious books into the fire , and showing the people how the god would not let them burn .

does it make you wonder about druids white robes , which apparently they never washed , maybe

because they just threw them in the fire , and they came out pristine ???

Edited by Passing Time
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Thinking more on FOD, Welsh FOD as in eisteddfod is a word that means BE. (bod/cognate with beon)

be (v.) Old English beon, beom, bion "be, exist, come to be, become, happen,"

with DIK as before said DIGER = diligent - diger 1, digere, dig-er, dig-er-e, afries., Adj.: nhd. sorgfältig, genau; ne. diligent

digerlik***, dig-er-lik***, afries., Adj.: nhd. treu, sorgsam, genau; ne. true, exact

I'd love the word FODDIK to be this - for an eternal burning flame.

Edited by The Puzzler
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Hi VG,

What's the 'rag element' you speak of? I rely on translation for Dutch and all I'm finding for voddig is words like 'sloppy, shoddy, dowdy, messy' etc.

Thinking more on FOD, Welsh FOD as in eisteddfod is a word that means BE. (bod/cognate with beon)

be (v.) Old English beon, beom, bion "be, exist, come to be, become, happen,"

with DIK as before said DIGER = diligent - diger 1, digere, dig-er, dig-er-e, afries., Adj.: nhd. sorgfältig, genau; ne. diligent

digerlik***, dig-er-lik***, afries., Adj.: nhd. treu, sorgsam, genau; ne. true, exact

I'd love the word FODDIK to be this - for an eternal burning flame.

Hi Puzz, you and PT gave me real food for thought about the amber. Thnx for that.

About the rag element, i see in foddik the frisian foddig (nowadays voddig) like you mention to be sloppy.

Meaning in split terms: voddig to be interpreted as vod-like (-ig in Dutch is the -like form, rag-like, like a rag).

to rag inlijven (ww.) ; incorporeren (ww.) ; opnemen in groter geheel (ww.) ; ontgroenen (ww.) ; lap (ww.) ; vod (ww.) ; prul (ww.) ; flard (ww.) ; homp (ww.) ; lor (ww.) ; vodje (ww.) ; lapje (ww.) ; doekje (ww.) the rag de lomp ; het flutblaadje ; de dweil rag lap in de zin van poetsdoe ; tod ; poetsdoek

http://www.mijnwoordenboek.nl/vertaal/EN/NL/rag

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/vod

VOD=OLD TORN TISSUE = RAG which i think was the base for the wick (in old times old rags or flax tissues were used as wicks for the oil lamp)

Voddig is also used for a "slow" person, not very refined walking around in rags. Slow is very accurate for the long lasting fire of the lamp.

The wings (wiek) of the windmills were also voddig in the sense it was made of big 'tissues' to catch the wind (fi made of kind of linnen).

And as said before: in Dutch "vodden"="lompen" -> lamp? But that is maybe a stretch too far for now, but I can't think it being unrelated.

Because the lamp has a hanging (sloppy) wick that burns.

All these reasons for me are enough to hold the belief the base for foddick is a sloppy wick(from flax/linnen rags->voddig), burning slow and very long with not very much fuel to have.

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Wewelsburg, Westphalia, Germany, is an early 17th century castle (burg), with a large north tower and two smaller towers in the south-west and south-east, the interior of which was rebuilt by its new owners during the 1930s and '40s. It has been speculated that the choice of this particular castle was influenced by Karl Wiligut, and it is known that earlier buildings existed on the site.

Wewelsburg-arial.jpg

Construction work was interrupted by the later stages of the Second World War, and the rebuilding was never finished. The north tower was to be the centrepiece of the new project, but only two rooms were completed: a meeting room, and below it, what has come to be called the vault or crypt. This contained 12 pedestals, and a central fire pit. A gas pipe had been run underground to the central pit, to fuel an eternal flame, though there is no evidence that this was ever lit. There are no surviving documents describing what the room was intended to be used for, though many theories have been proposed.

wewelsburg1.jpg

The principal architect of the rebuilding, Hermann Bartels, also drew up plans for a massive scheme to make Wewelsburg the "Centre of the World", which again, never came to fruition. In the following groundplan, the castle itself is represented by the small triangle in the middle, with the north tower, and its eternal flame, in the exact centre. The castle forms the apex of a much larger triangle extending to the south, comprising buildings and open spaces of various functions. This, in turn, is enclosed within a series of concentric circles consisting of walls and fortifications, with a geometric design of six spokes, delineated by buildings and radial roads (note, however, that due to the proximity of the nearby river and other landscape features, the circle is not complete).

Ausbauplan+Wewelsburg+-+Occult+History+Third+Reich+-+Peter+Crawford.jpg

A larger view of the overall plan shows the outermost circular road, with a diameter of 1270 meters. A wide, tree-lined, 2 km long access road approaches the estate from the south. Within the estate were open areas, dwellings for soldiers, a school, library, and various other facilites, even a running track. Historians are baffled as to the exact purpose of these grandiose plans, and especially the highly impractical design, which would have entailed the demolition of the adjoining village.

bh-124-10.jpg

After the war, the castle reverted to the ownsership of the local district council, and is now a museum. The larger plan never came to pass, and historians still have no idea what it was all about...

But I do.

This is the subject of my next book. I would be very happy to accept the assistance, and suggestions, of anyone here who wishes to help.

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Hi Puzz, you and PT gave me real food for thought about the amber. Thnx for that.

About the rag element, i see in foddik the frisian foddig (nowadays voddig) like you mention to be sloppy.

Meaning in split terms: voddig to be interpreted as vod-like (-ig in Dutch is the -like form, rag-like, like a rag).

to rag inlijven (ww.) ; incorporeren (ww.) ; opnemen in groter geheel (ww.) ; ontgroenen (ww.) ; lap (ww.) ; vod (ww.) ; prul (ww.) ; flard (ww.) ; homp (ww.) ; lor (ww.) ; vodje (ww.) ; lapje (ww.) ; doekje (ww.) the rag de lomp ; het flutblaadje ; de dweil rag lap in de zin van poetsdoe ; tod ; poetsdoek

http://www.mijnwoordenboek.nl/vertaal/EN/NL/rag

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/vod

VOD=OLD TORN TISSUE = RAG which i think was the base for the wick (in old times old rags or flax tissues were used as wicks for the oil lamp)

Voddig is also used for a "slow" person, not very refined walking around in rags. Slow is very accurate for the long lasting fire of the lamp.

The wings (wiek) of the windmills were also voddig in the sense it was made of big 'tissues' to catch the wind (fi made of kind of linnen).

And as said before: in Dutch "vodden"="lompen" -> lamp? But that is maybe a stretch too far for now, but I can't think it being unrelated.

Because the lamp has a hanging (sloppy) wick that burns.

All these reasons for me are enough to hold the belief the base for foddick is a sloppy wick(from flax/linnen rags->voddig), burning slow and very long with not very much fuel to have.

Thanks for the explanation. I see the rag-lap to vod as cotton cloth (rag). https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/váð#Old_Norse

English wad.

I'm not sure about it as etymology of foddik yet though.

Interesting reading lamp etymology...

. Replaced Old English leohtfæt "light vessel."

faet might be fod? (vat from fet/ped) which could mean vessel (of the lamp) in the word

Bit touch and go though.

Edited by The Puzzler
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Ok thanks for having the patience to spell it out slowly once more for me :) Indeed a very interesting link and insights.

Maybe a bit too fast, but i thought you and Puzzler were referring to amber as fuel in the 'stone' version (so actually burning the amberpiece as you would do with incense or coal).

But as i try to understand correctly now, you are more thinking of an oil-made version of amber, using a wick to keep the fire burning?

----------------------

edit:

In one of Apol's references (https://ia801407.us....a00jevegoog.pdf) I saw a very interesting point.

p44, seef fiddick -> ein fluegel

Fiddick for wing (vleugel). If you take the wings of windmills for instance. These are called 'wiek' in Dutch, and a wiek is also the wick to keep the fire burning.

wiek zn. ‘vleugel; molenarm’; (BN) ‘kaarsenpit; tampon’ http://www.etymologi...trefwoord/wiek1

I'm convinced: the foddik (fiddick) is referring to a wick.

That's interesting, 'Van Gorp'. I have to ponder about that connection.

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The principal architect of the rebuilding, Hermann Bartels, also drew up plans for a massive scheme to make Wewelsburg the "Centre of the World", which again, never came to fruition. In the following groundplan, the castle itself is represented by the small triangle in the middle, with the north tower, and its eternal flame, in the exact centre. The castle forms the apex of a much larger triangle extending to the south, comprising buildings and open spaces of various functions. This, in turn, is enclosed within a series of concentric circles consisting of walls and fortifications, with a geometric design of six spokes, delineated by buildings and radial roads (note, however, that due to the proximity of the nearby river and other landscape features, the circle is not complete).

Indeed, very interesting, 'Tony S.' !

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Thanks for the clear references, if i understand correctly the reference for voddig as voeding and base for foddik comes from the 'taalsleutel' site.

Personally i still don't see any reason to think the foddik was based on something different then a kind of oil lamp with rags as a wick, because that was the most used/known ancient method to keep a (even fade, mind the word fade) light burning as long as possible, with less effort (feeding substance) as possible.

Surely because general frisian 'foddig' is just 'voddig' pointing to the rag element, what imo makes entirely sence on its own when talking also about ancient oil lamps using rags as wick to keep it burning. But i leave it hear for the moment, maybe i will still switch thoughts about this later on.

Yes, it comes from the Taal Sleutel site. Here are the full texts about foddik in the sleutel:

Foddik (oudfries), Taalcategorie: boventaal, Bewerking: bij zoek/(h)oog te zich, Uitkomst: om wat te zien, Tessels: voddig, Overige info: fries: foddich.

Foddik (oudfries): om te onderscheiden.

Foddik (oudfries): voedt zichzelf, Taalcategorie: boventaal, Bewerking: voed-te-zich, Tessels: voeding-voeding, Overige info: altijd brandende lamp.

Foddik (oudfries): vocht om mee te kunnen kijken, Taalcategorie: boventaal, Bewerking: vocht te kijk: olie, Uitkomst: vocht om mee te kunnen kijken, Tessels: kieke-kijken, Overige info: altijd brandende lamp.

Foddik (oudfries): het zicht beweegt steeds, Taalcategorie: ondertaal, Bewerking: zich(t) te schoof, Uitkomst: het zicht beweegt steeds, Tessels: fikkie-vuurtje, Overige info: altijd brandende lamp.

Foddik (oudfries): dooft vanzel, Taalcategorie: ondertaal, Bewerking: zich te doof, Uitkomst: dooft vanzel, Tessels: dove, Overige info: doof: te-chof.

De Internationale Etymologische Taal Sleutel

www.taalsleutel.nl/pages/alle_talen1.php

You may be right that the lamp was fueled by oil/fat. I don't really know. I have to study it more thoroughly - not least what you have provided. But I'll leave it for some while, I think.

Edited by Apol
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Wewelsburg, Westphalia, Germany...

I actually only live a 1,5 hour drive from it and have passed by a few times, driving between my homeland and current home.

But the presumption that the place will have been fully hijacked by the invaders, kept me from visiting the site.

Interesting material indeed, Tony, this and what you PM'ed me.

It stimulates me to dive deeper into it as well.

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I actually only live a 1,5 hour drive from it and have passed by a few times, driving between my homeland and current home.

But the presumption that the place will have been fully hijacked by the invaders, kept me from visiting the site.

Interesting material indeed, Tony, this and what you PM'ed me.

It stimulates me to dive deeper into it as well.

Thank you, and I'll continue to share anything I discover.

It would be very interesting if you could visit the castle one day, perhaps taking some photos and describing your impressions. I don't know what might still be found there, but at least we now have a better idea of what we're looking for than any previous investigator. Symbols, carvings, inscriptions, anything really.

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It would be very interesting if you could visit the castle one day, perhaps taking some photos and describing your impressions. I don't know what might still be found there, but at least we now have a better idea of what we're looking for than any previous investigator. Symbols, carvings, inscriptions, anything really.

Good idea, I will!

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Some ( - the Dutch amongst us - ) will remember the Taaldacht site, created by an amateur (?) Dutch linguist. A couple of days after I posted about "bukja" and so on, he starts discussing it too:

http://taaldacht.nl/2016/01/20/engels-boy-nederlands-bui/#more-11220

Well, it may not be a coincidence because years ago I posted on his site and made him aware of this thread. Might be interesting for those who can read Dutch to follow the topics on his site.

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On a flight of fancy here....... but what about the Magi being the Sept , or Clan of the Scots McGhie ,

220px-BerryMcGhie.jpeg

The Scots were originally from ireland , ............. The Magi paid no account to their people , and they had no name ,

so we called them the Finn .... so how about them being the Fianna of the fianna Fail.....people of destiny .

http://www.shee-eire.com/magic&mythology/Warriors&Heroes/Armies/Fianna/Page1.htm

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"This Garuda column of Vasudeva (Vishnu), the god of gods, was erected here by Heliodorus, a worshipper of Vishnu, the son of Dion, and an inhabitant of Taxila, who came as Greek ambassador from the Great King Antialkidas to King Kasiputra Bhagabhadra, the savior, then reigning prosperously in the fourteenth year of his kingship". (Lines 1-7; column at Besnagar)

"Three immortal precepts (footsteps) ... when practised lead to Heaven: self-restraint, charity, conscientiousness" (Lines 1-2; from another text on the column?)

This makes me wonder: Taxila = Texland?

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This makes me wonder: Taxila = Texland?

More toponyms might be related.

"The Toxandri (or Texuandri, Taxandri, Toxandrians etc.) were a people living at the time of the Roman empire. Their territory was called Toxandria, Toxiandria or Taxandria, a name which survived into the Middle Ages." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxandri

"Thessaloniki (...) is the second-largest city in Greece and the capital of Greek Macedonia, ..." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thessaloniki

There also is a big and important one in India, but I forgot the exact name.

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There also is a big and important one in India, but I forgot the exact name.

Ah, that was in fact Taxila:

Posted 17 August 2014 - 07:06 PM

Both in Greece and in India, important places (region, city) have names that are similar to OLB's TEXLAND (or current Dutch Texel, pronounced "Tessel"):

Greece: Thessaly

Northern India: Taxila

"By some accounts, Taxila was considered to be amongst the earliest universities in the world."

The official etymologies are questionable, imo.

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You quoted an old post in which you said that the etymologies are questionable.

But that might change when you consider that Taxila was a "tehsil":

A post from 4 (!!) years ago:

http://www.unexplain...20#entry4257886

.

Edited by Abramelin
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Is 2012 six years ago?

Could the word "tehsil" have been derived from TEX?

Lol, I already changed it to 4 years.

-

Well, the meaning of a tehsil comes close to what Texland stood for.

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