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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 3]


Abramelin
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On 1-8-2019 at 3:39 PM, Ott said:

VG, are you even aware that I made a new English translation which is available online (www.oeralinda.be)?

From page 49:

" During the whole summer, Sun had hidden behind clouds, as if she did not want to see Earth. Wind rested in his bags,(1) causing smoke and steam to stand like pillars over houses and pools."

(1) ‘ Wind rested in his bags’ (WIND RESTON IN SINA BÛDAR) — The idea of windbags is known from Homer's Odyssey where the hero is given a bag with winds from Aeolus (beginning of book 10; the word used is ἀσκος - hide, skin, leather bag).

An inversion layer:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inversion_(meteorology)

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On 3-8-2019 at 5:40 PM, Ott said:

Another one for you Van Gorp:

Stolp = stel-op?

Magnificent!

About 'stel': You can have it idd in many forms.

Stoel

stoel.jpg.ac47d5686c4d9ce83ccc5dcea5173706.jpg

 

To make it complete: one more block to dismantle: block 'stel' steel' 'stol' 'stijl' ... -> 'sta hel' ? (stand up)

Then stelling means: sta-helling?

stelling.jpg.53c7240d6ad07af2ea3438228c4b30b4.jpg

Like Plato is said to have concluded in 'Cratylus' (pondering on the fact why words are what they are):

in original words you could make up the meaning of the word by the name itself.

If not they were concluded to be imported from another language.

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Stoel/ stool (seat) indeed and I thought of some more:

Stop (lid, plug) perhaps was originally stolp (roof) - it stops (rain) things going in or out.

Top (later version of the same)

Stable (noun - Dutch stal; adjective - Dutch stabiel)

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Nice to see some good old etymological discussion here those are what I like the most.

Two words I have been brooding on for a while but had not the mood or motivation to post about:

 

HÜNING

  • Dutch: honing

    • Afrikaans: heuning

  • German: Honig

  • English: honey

  • Swedish: honung

  • etc.

 

Supposedly the root of this word has something to do with colour (yellow or gold) of the honey itself. Although I think the -ing suffix which has fallen away in German and English is the key. One then takes this -ing which means ‘engendered by’ and one looks at what the main root is to which it is attached.

Since this word is used in the OLB and still sounds more or less the same in Dutch Frisian (or her daughter dialects), one may look for a word in the circumference of *HÜN.

The most senseful one I have found is the archaic verb huien (zwellen, uitzetten, uitdijen = expand, swell, grow). Honey then being the product of expansion or growth.

 

WIN (sing.), WINA (pl.)

WINNA (v.)

 

Here the word to win and wine seem to have literally been the same thing. This is nicely retained in English sothat I am not even going to bring other examples.

Wine being what is won from the harvest, what one wins from the land.

 

~

 

Initially this would have been a whole post TOGHATER MITH MÉIDE but that for later.

Edited by Pierre Jakob
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On 6-8-2019 at 9:44 AM, Pierre Jakob said:

HÜNING

  • Dutch: honing

    • Afrikaans: heuning

  • German: Honig

  • English: honey

  • Swedish: honung

  • etc.

 

Hü-n-ing: ghu-nad-ing

ghu - to pour

nad / nud - to enjoy

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  • 1 month later...

EK ~ each (person) an oak (tree)?

 

Here is another interesting connection between the OLB and Bock Saga, in particular an etymological support or supplement out of the Old-Frisian from the OLB, which might be explainable through the mythos of the Bock Saga.

If I recall correctly, in the Bockic worldview each person’s soul is associated with an oak tree.

 

ek.png.82fcadc2dfb8eed622e563ff9ad33ac9.png

 

The etymological precursor for the English word each was Old-Frisian EK, today known in Dutch as elk, while even this form is also found in the OLB as ELK. Thus an interesting case where both variants of words that have the same meaning but apparently different etymological roots, are both found in Old-Frisian (compare Engl. yes with German ja – both used in the OLB as JES and )

 

An example of EK (each) in use from pg.28:

 

Quote

 

THA BÒT.MÔNNA EK TWA DÉLA.

THI SKIPRUN EK THRÉ DÉLA.

THÀT ÔRA SKIP.IS.FOLK EK ÉN DÉL.

THA JONGSTE PRENTAR EK EN THRIMNATH.

THA MIDLOSTA EK EN HALV.DÉL ÀND

THA ÔLDESTA EK EN TWÉDNATH.

 

the boatswains each two shares,

the pilots each three shares,

the rest of the ship’s folk each one share,

the youngest apprentices each a third,

the middle ones a half, and

the oldest each two-thirds.

 

 

Interestingly the word oak in Old-Frisian was ēk (ÉKEN is used once on pg.148). The name for the oak tree also seems to be unique in the Germanic languages:

Quote

"tree or shrub of the genus Quercus," Middle English oke, from Old English ac "oak tree" and in part from cognate Old Norse eik, both from Proto-Germanic *aiks (source also of Old Saxon and Old Frisian ek, Middle Dutch eike, Dutch eik, Old High German eih, German Eiche, Swedish ek, Danish eg), a word of uncertain origin with no certain cognates outside Germanic.

 

Lastly, it is not a far cry to suppose that IK (I, ik, ich, jag etc.) and EK (each) are etymologically related. The ‘I’ and ‘E’ sounds can easily replace each other (cf. SIND & SEND) and there are other cases where they represent the same sound.

 

If one then says that:

  • IK = EK

    • i.e. I (the individual) = each (any, all, every, each one)

and that as in other cases a short ‘E’ sound can be stretched to an ‘É’ sound and so retain etymological relevance:

  • EK --> ÉK

    • each --> oak

 

This reads then as: “each Individual is an oak” (EK IK IS EN ÉK), which is a core principle from the Bock Saga.

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  • 2 weeks later...

In that case, also Dutch 'ook', Frisian 'ek' and German 'auch' (meaning 'also') will be related.

And Dutch 'oog', German 'Auge' and Frisian 'each' (meaning 'eye').

It is not hard to make sense of this.

Edited by Ott
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  • 4 weeks later...

From a very decent and solid reference: www.oeralinda.be
Jan has definitely set a new marker in the queste, kwestie, ge-wist-je dat-je.

Wistje datje from my point of view:

what do have oeRaLiNDa, oRLaeNDo, RoNaLDoe, RoeLaNDo, LeoNaRDo, LoReDaNo (aka VERLINDE) in common?

Right! Some letters and sounds:
it must be the language, be it Frysland, Veldjië, Frankenrijk, the Guerre-maniacs, the Ab-Reitene or the oIrelaendisch :-)

From the source mentionned above: what do names tell us?
In first order of appearance :-) Adela, Adela's followers. https://www.oeralinda.be/2019/02/list-of-names.html

I think most of us understand it comes from aEdel (by the commoners known as kNowable people).
Genau! Right, ge-nauwe aanverwanten or known to us because they are sincere to us in conduct and mind.
Family, it's in the genen and we know them because we are close, nauw, to them.
That is why they are called followers, indeed they follow the line/tradition (not mere worshipping), most closely by aedele (family) ties.
Birds of a feather flock together, that's just what they do.

It was the old nobility, based on matriarchy and true aEdel conduct.
By the switch to patriarchal society, aEdel became Nauw-abel because superficial traits, material conduct and mere (schemed) familie liassons became the trend.
That nobility became kwown as the Romans were known, famous, beroemd (Roem-ene) and famoused in the first place themselves and their kies-heer (Caesar) above the others, their chosen one, Keizer mijn KiesHeer mijn Ketsheer.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Good to see you are still alive, Van Gorp!

 

Here are some words that I've been brewing on:

  • ROM in Yuletext allows for it to be read with a Dutch 'oo' or 'oe'. This makes the possible etymology of the city of Rome more interesting. The city is actually mentioned on pg. 199:
Quote

 

THÁ THA TRÔJANA TO THA HÉINDA KRÉKA LANDUM NEST.LED WÉRON. THÁ HÀVON HJA THÉR MITH TID ÀND FLIT ÉNE STERKE STÉD MITH WÁLLA ÀND BURGUM BVWED ROME THAT IS RUM HÉTEN.

After the Trojans had nestled in the Near Greeklands, with rigor and vigor they built a bastion of walls and towers, named Rome — meaning roomy or renown.

 

 

Along with the two translations Jan gave of roomy and renown for Old-Frisian ROME/ RUM (which fit quite well) - there is a third word in Dutch that to me helps make more sense of roem (: as 'renown') which is room (: 'cream'). Room being the cream of the crop, so it is also renown (roem) in and of itself. Thus Rome as a name of a city was probably meant as a witty wordplay on these possible meanings.

 

  • Another word I've thought about is Feme or veem (found in German and Dutch) referring to as far as I understand it, a type of old-fashioned Judicial Court. In German the word Verfemung meaning 'a banning'. Perhaps Feme and veem could be derived from FÁM in the sense of their judicial powers to ban people out of 'Fryaslands'?
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On 6/17/2019 at 6:02 PM, FFv3 said:

how do you read the following lines

I am working on translating Harbardsljod and Skirnirsmal, maybe write a book. Skirnir forces the marriage between Frey an the Giant Gerd,but the marriage is actually a marriage between Frey and Skuld. Skuld is one of the three norns who controls the destiny to all human . It is all symbolic, but it means something like this: The Jotun/Giant forces becomes part of the Vanir tribes, an like that take control of the destiny of all human within the Royal seat of Frey. It is cursed from the beginning, but the ties are like those of a religion. Making an enclosure, Gerd means enclosure, and also linked to the human mind.     Just some thoughts from me so far.

Edited by Skirnum
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On 11/4/2019 at 3:45 PM, Pierre Jakob said:
  • ROM in Yuletext allows for it to be read with a Dutch 'oo' or 'oe'. This makes the possible etymology of the city of Rome more interesting. The city is actually mentioned on pg. 199:

 

Along with the two translations Jan gave of roomy and renown for Old-Frisian ROME/ RUM (which fit quite well) - there is a third word in Dutch that to me helps make more sense of roem (: as 'renown') which is room (: 'cream'). Room being the cream of the crop, so it is also renown (roem) in and of itself. Thus Rome as a name of a city was probably meant as a witty wordplay on these possible meanings.

 

  • Another word I've thought about is Feme or veem (found in German and Dutch) referring to as far as I understand it, a type of old-fashioned Judicial Court. In German the word Verfemung meaning 'a banning'. Perhaps Feme and veem could be derived from FÁM in the sense of their judicial powers to ban people out of 'Fryaslands'?

If Rome can be equalled with room, then Rome might mean 'white' = white stone, marble?

Feme / veem might be related to femelen.

A lot is said about femelen in "Woordenboek der frequentatieven in het Nederlandsch" (1875), which might be briefly summarized as 'to talk, to take apart into its tiniest threads', and that it derives from 'hand'.

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Interesting word this femelen, Ell. I’ve never heard of it before.

 

In previous posts (here and here), I’ve pondered out loud what the possible meaning of the root of the word be-gin could mean. Obviously it is a composition between a *gin or *jin word, with a be- prefix added on. That this word is not only overold, but also denoted a holy concept to the Old-Frisians, makes it all the more interesting.

 

Now this word as verb with the be- prefix, can be conjugated and changes its vowl:

  • English ==> begin, began, begun

  • Dutch ==> beginnen, begon, begonnen

  • German ==> beginnen, begann, begonnen

  • OLB ==> BIJINA, BIJONON/ BIJONDON (*) ???

    • *Also as: BIGOST/ BIGOSTON

 

This exercise with the verb conjugations to show that the vowl is mostly found as an ‘i’ or an ‘o’.

 

The OLB spelling with a ‘j’ (in modern English pronounced like ‘y’ in yes) instead of a ‘g’ for be-gin is a very interesting archaism that as far as I know, has not been paid much attention to by linguists. It sets the ur-root in the area of a *jin, or for English readers *yin word.

 

*** A word voiced almost like *yin is eon:

Quote

The word aeon /ˈɒn/, also spelled eon (in American English), originally meant "life", "vital force" or "being", "generation" or "a period of time", though it tended to be translated as "age" in the sense of "ages", "forever", "timeless" or "for eternity". It is a Latin transliteration from the koine Greek word  αἰών (ho aion), from the archaic αἰϝών (aiwon). In Homer it typically refers to life or lifespan. Its latest meaning is more or less similar to the Sanskrit word kalpa and Hebrew word olam. A cognate Latin word aevum or aeuum (cf. αἰϝών) for "age" is present in words such as longevity and mediaeval.[1]

 

Note æon could also denote a spirit being emanating from the Godhead (definition #5 here), it had ‘holy’ or religious connotations just like BIJIN has in the OLB in relation with Wralda (“the Godhead”) and Time:

Quote

Aion (Greek: Αἰών) is a Hellenistic deity associated with time, the orb or circle encompassing the universe, and the zodiac. The "time" represented by Aion is unbounded, in contrast to Chronos as empirical time divided into past, present, and future.[1] He is thus a god of the ages, associated with mystery religions concerned with the afterlife, such as the mysteries of Cybele, Dionysus, Orpheus, and Mithras. In Latin the concept of the deity may appear as Aevum or Saeculum.[2] He is typically in the company of an earth or mother goddess such as Tellus or Cybele, as on the Parabiago plate.[3]

 

Note the Roman equivalent of the Aion deity apparently is Aeternitas, etymologically related to aevum and eaveternity, the root of ‘eternity’. Recall then that the Latin words {Aeternitas, aevum, aeveternity} show a keen relation to OLB holy-word ÉWA (discussed here).

 

ÉWA & BIJIN are symbols of the Godhead (WRALDA), denoting his Beginning and Everlastingness. Likewise the Southern European Aeternitas & Aion – all having something to do with Time and the origin of the Cosmos.

Edited by Pierre Jakob
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56 minutes ago, Pierre Jakob said:

In previous posts (here and here), I’ve pondered out loud what the possible meaning of the root of the word be-gin could mean. Obviously it is a composition between a *gin or *jin word, with a be- prefix added on. That this word is not only overold, but also denoted a holy concept to the Old-Frisians, makes it all the more interesting.

 

Now this word as verb with the be- prefix, can be conjugated and changes its vowl:

  • English ==> begin, began, begun

  • Dutch ==> beginnen, begon, begonnen

  • German ==> beginnen, begann, begonnen

  • OLB ==> BIJINA, BIJONON/ BIJONDON (*) ???

    • *Also as: BIGOST/ BIGOSTON

 

This exercise with the verb conjugations to show that the vowl is mostly found as an ‘i’ or an ‘o’.

 

The OLB spelling with a ‘j’ (in modern English pronounced like ‘y’ in yes) instead of a ‘g’ for be-gin is a very interesting archaism that as far as I know, has not been paid much attention to by linguists. It sets the ur-root in the area of a *jin, or for English readers *yin word.

It seems to me that -gin / -jin is etymologically related to the Roman god Janus, the god of beginning (and ending). I have also concluded that the Roman god Janus is identical with the Hindu god Ganesha.

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  • 8 months later...

Hello everyone, me again

I have discovered the smoking gun for the Oera Linda Book being authentic. The calendar system that is described in the Yule section was discovered in the 1970s and was made known to the public in the 2000s. Dr. Alexandar Durman discovered it in Croatia. Atleast the first yule wheel. Jan Ott's Translation of the Oera Linda Book says the following, "Depicted above are the signs of the Yule, which is the primal symbol of Wralda and of the potential or the beginning from which time came; the Carrier that must forever go around with the Yule." These three Yule Wheels have 6 letters each. The first Yule Wheel spells Wralda. These letters are constellations. The calendar found by Dr. Durman is the exact same Yule Wheel. There is a picture of a pot that has the Yule Wheel with the first symbol of Wralda on it which dates back to 2600BCE. Here is the links to the information about the Calendar system. This is the ultimate evidence that the Oera Linda Book is authentic because at the time of the book being translated and published the calendar system was not known about. The fact that the calendar described in the book was discovered 100 years later proves that the book is not a hoax and it the authentic history of the people who descend from the bell beaker people aka the Fryans. Remember Jensma lied and said the book history was completely inaccurate. There is a obvious attempt to prevent the book from being known to our people.

image.png.322be33c2a995eca8697f85a17616a84.png

http://www.oocities.org/vucedol_culture/Orion.htm

 


Image

Image

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The link is dead.

And for the rest: meager 'evidence'.

 

Edited by Abramelin
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12 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

The link is dead.

And for the rest: meager 'evidence'.

 

Hi Abe

Glad to see you hope all is well with you

jmccr8

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Recently I got myself a smartphone, so don't expect 'impressive' posts. The phone is my only access to the internet, sorry. And it's already giving me a  bloody headache.

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What I think no one really explained properly, is why a ms, socalled written around 600 bce, is flooded  with borrowings from Latin at a time the Latins/Romans were just a minor tribe.

When requested, I can give many examples.

 

 

Edited by Abramelin
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Apparently the local lego-linguists have all fled to a safer haven.

And that is a real damn shame. These guys and girls all hate science, well, as long as science opposes their ideas. As soon as science somewhat seems to support one of their ... ideas concerning European history, they are eager to copy and paste it in a post here.

Well, truth be told, not much of history has been posted for pages.

Participating in this thread has taught me lot. I have found out a lot about the Phoenicians. At some point I even tried to learn Hebrew, because that is the language that is the closest (or even equal) to  the Phoenician language.

These sailors sailed the Med, they sailed around Africa, they visited Cornwall (tin), they may have visited the North Sea in search for amber.

Some say they even sailed as far as the Azores, or even South America (based on inscriptions found there).

Their influence on the Atlantic part of Europe may have concerned language as well as giant stone structures, or the socalled megaliths. And even on Nordic mythology.

Ok, all that if we have to believe the German linguist (a real one!) , Theo Vennemann.

I also learned a lot about Frisian history. If I was a writer  I could write a bestseller about Frisian history, and that without using fabels like the Oera Linda Book.

 

 

 

Edited by Abramelin
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Google the Frisian participation in the crusades. They were similar to IS. But the 'Christian' way.

 

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Google 'Frisian fighters and the Crusade'. It was written by a Dutch guy.

 

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The  Frisians were not 'nice people', during Roman times, no,  they were raiders, pirates, hooligans. And they hooked up with the Chaucians.

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3 hours ago, Abramelin said:

The  Frisians were not 'nice people', during Roman times, no,  they were raiders, pirates, hooligans. And they hooked up with the Chaucians.

The first set or the ones that settled after they were wiped out? 

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2 hours ago, Piney said:

The first set or the ones that settled after they were wiped out? 

The first set, the 'Frisii'.

The pdf about the Frisian participation during 'the Holy  Crusades' : Frisian Fighters and the Crusade, by Johannes A. Mol (Fryske Akademij, Leeuwarden).

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