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Will we ever be able to visit 'Earth 2.0' ?

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Kepler-452b, the most Earth-like world ever found outside our solar system, is 1400 light years away.

Last month astronomers rejoiced at the discovery of an extrasolar planet that has been unofficially dubbed 'Earth 2. 0' - a rocky terrestrial world that orbits the same distance from its parent star as the Earth does from the sun - the habitable zone within which liquid water can exist on a planet's surface.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...-visit-earth-20

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TheGreatBeliever

I do believe its possible. Mayb a century or two from now...

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Patient Zero

i think someday, yes.

But far beyond my life time... Dang it!

Off topic question time, call the kids in.

The picture used in the columns mobile article looks familiar.

Is that the ship from Mass Effect?

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bubblykiss

One century ago planes were made of cloth and sticks and there were more horses in NYC than Cars.....a lot can and does change with a large diversely educated population working hard to invent new things.

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Imaginarynumber1

One century ago planes were made of cloth and sticks and there were more horses in NYC than Cars.....a lot can and does change with a large diversely educated population working hard to invent new things.

But sometimes mankind stumbles in our quest for technological wonders.... remember crystal pepsi?

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seeder

We dont really know what high speed space travel will do to the body, just 6 mths on the space station shows bone loss and deep space travel provides exposure to harmful galactic cosmic rays, so personally I dont think man will travel beyond our own S/S.

But for sure, faster probes will, but thats about it... but it will all take a lot of time

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DieChecker

I'd say that if humans want to go there, then YES we will go there. We're, as a species, not one to give up.

We could go there right now, it simply would take a long time.

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Anomalocaris

We dont really know what high speed space travel will do to the body, just 6 mths on the space station shows bone loss and deep space travel provides exposure to harmful galactic cosmic rays, so personally I dont think man will travel beyond our own S/S.

But for sure, faster probes will, but thats about it... but it will all take a lot of time

Faster probes sound more achievables and safer

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bubblykiss

I'd say that if humans want to go there, then YES we will go there. We're, as a species, not one to give up.

We could go there right now, it simply would take a long time.

I always said I would not rest until Taeniopteryx araneoides was finally made extinct and I won't....wait, what? All gone? Nap time.

But no really the challenges seem insurmountable but we put a man on the moon back when indoor plumbing was still rare in large parts of this country. With a sufficiently long enough time line the possible miracles of the future will be almost inconceivable to us today.

I often wonder if future generations will look back at us as a dark ages, asking themselves how humanity even lived without social innovations A, B and C or technologies D, E and F.

Edited by bubblykiss
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seeder

Faster probes sound more achievables and safer

Its the only way. Lets say a manned craft will have at least, at least, 6 people, now lets say they will travel for ten years someplace... imagine the size/weight of the food and water stores? Let alone other supplies and equipment and FUEL of some description?

I dont think Id enjoy ten years in space one way, I think cabin fever would set in pretty quick. Yes scifi movies (Star Trek for ex) show a huge ship with gravity and loads of people.... but the reality is totally different of course

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Anomalocaris

Just explore our own solar system seems a difficult task. Plus, a spaceship traveling at high speeds with its crew It's like going from hard science fiction to the space opera :P

Edited by Anomalocaris
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Rhino666

Not in our life time and another 3!! and when it is possible it'll be for the extremely privileged.

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seeder

Not in our life time and another 3!! and when it is possible it'll be for the extremely privileged.

But the problem is always the same, even in 1000 years the problem remains, nothing travels faster than light, so even if we could travel at light speed, it would still take 14000 years to arrive, average lifespan of humans is 70 years, and procreation in space is unlikely and would...if it were possible, lead to children born in zero gravity, which would mean mass deformities in a child

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Junior Chubb

This thread won't be around if we ever do...

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seeder

Heres some side effects of space travel (just to Mars, a relatively short trip)

1) Even by the time space travellers had arrived on Mars, they might well not be in good health. By the time astronauts arrived, they would be hit by six times the dose of radiation endured by Space Station astronauts.

2) Their bones might well already have been severely damaged – space travelers can lose (on average) 1 to 2 percent of bone mass each month.

‘The magnitude of this effect has led NASA to consider bone loss an inherent risk of extended space flights,’ says Dr. Jay Shapiro.

3) Astronauts would also be exposed to extremely high levels of radiation – so much that the idea of having children on Mars might be a pipe dream.

Space radiation is a fact of life for astronauts – and the doses involved in a Mars mission would be sufficiently large that space tourist Dennis Tito’s proposed Mars mission aimed to recruit a married couple beyond reproductive age, as they won’t be at risk from birth defects caused by radiation.

Missions to Mars would involve an unheard of amount of radiation. Astronauts on a six-month mission on the Space Station absorb 100 millisieverts of radiation. Going to Mars would involve being hit with more than six times that – and to put this in context, on Earth, we absorb around 3 millisieverts per year.

4) Some estimates suggest that up to 30% of the cells in an astronaut’s body would be hit with radiation during flight.

Results from the Curiosity Rover suggest that astronauts would receive just over the lifetime allowance for astronauts in one return trip to Mars – associated with a 5% rise in cancer risk.

In other words, one trip and you’d have to retire

http://metro.co.uk/2015/08/03/not-quite-human-what-will-really-happen-to-the-first-people-on-mars-5324715/#ixzz3hmHIsvLd

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bison

If interstellar travel is possible, it seems more likely that it will involve folded or warped space. The relativistic prohibition against local velocities above that of light is not an issue here. Local (within normal space) velocity is essentially zero, while global velocities well above that of light are conceivable.

Edited by bison
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DieChecker

Its the only way. Lets say a manned craft will have at least, at least, 6 people, now lets say they will travel for ten years someplace... imagine the size/weight of the food and water stores? Let alone other supplies and equipment and FUEL of some description?

I dont think Id enjoy ten years in space one way, I think cabin fever would set in pretty quick. Yes scifi movies (Star Trek for ex) show a huge ship with gravity and loads of people.... but the reality is totally different of course

Probes would clearly be the most efficient way to go. A ship for 6 people would have to be pretty large. But if it was large enough, you could grow/recycle your wastes and not have to store as much. Size really will not be an issue once we start collecting small asteroids and parking them in orbit. Metal is space will be almost free at that point.

Fuel though would be a problem...

But the problem is always the same, even in 1000 years the problem remains, nothing travels faster than light, so even if we could travel at light speed, it would still take 14000 years to arrive, average lifespan of humans is 70 years, and procreation in space is unlikely and would...if it were possible, lead to children born in zero gravity, which would mean mass deformities in a child

The answer here is mass. Mass between the human and space protects against radiation. Which requires a lot of metal, but again, once we collect some asteroids you have your metal.

I though zero gravity losses were countered by exercise and by applying centrifugal forces to your ship.\

Retiring after one trip to Mars doesn't sound so bad. 5% increase in risk can come about from hundreds of variables. Doesn't sound so bad to me.

Heres some side effects of space travel (just to Mars, a relatively short trip)

All of which can be engineered to protect the humans. All you need is a lot of metal and a spinning ship.

Failing that bringing ovum, and sperm from Earth in highly shielded containers would fix fertility problems in the first generation. Underground habitats would protect future generations.

Edited by DieChecker
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Erowin

We will likely have to wait until we have Star Trek level 'warp drives' or Mass Effect style relays to have humans get to far off worlds. And that technology could take a thousands years or more to develop. Likely more... I'm sure things we never dreamed possible will be in the far off future. But it's pretty far off :(

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DieChecker

They (experts?) say that we create more data in one day today, then we did in a year, 10 years ago.

http://www.industryt...y-12-hours/3950

With that level of increase in knowledge (due to computers) going on, I don't think it will be thousands of years, but maybe only decades till we're able to leave our Earth.

http://epoq.wikia.co...wledge_doubling

When plotted on a graph this “The Knowledge Doubling Curve“ looks like a J curve (see diagram) but the curve is not smooth. Certain key events have been like thresholds. The invention of writing, then of printing (first in China then later in Europe) were significant thresholds. The printing of the Bible was an important precurser to the emergence of Quakerism in 17th Century England. The invention of the World Wide Web, and then Web 2 allowed for exponential increase in the speed of knowledge doubling, and IBM [see Toxic Terabyte link below] predicts that before 2014, the 50th anniversary of Boulding's lecture, recorded knowledge will be doubling every 11 hours.
Edited by DieChecker

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bison

We will likely have to wait until we have Star Trek level 'warp drives' or Mass Effect style relays to have humans get to far off worlds. And that technology could take a thousands years or more to develop. Likely more... I'm sure things we never dreamed possible will be in the far off future. But it's pretty far off :(

It isn't really clear that it will take huge lengths of time to develop a space-warping form of interstellar travel. It isn't as if we don't already have some reasonable scientific ideas ideas about how we might try to do this.

Dr. Harold White at NASA is currently running experiments intended to create a small space warp. Some of his results hint that he might already be on the right track.

While the Wright brothers were already tinkering with a flying machine, there were eminent persons who maintained that such a thing was, and would forever remain impossible. Maybe a 'warp drive' is a few decades, not millennia in our future.

Edited by bison

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy

Probes would clearly be the most efficient way to go. A ship for 6 people would have to be pretty large. But if it was large enough, you could grow/recycle your wastes and not have to store as much. Size really will not be an issue once we start collecting small asteroids and parking them in orbit. Metal is space will be almost free at that point.

It would indeed be possible to recycle waste into food and oxygen for the crew. Actually it is probably more likely that such a spaceship would be made of some sort of carbonrich material, as they are more efficient as radiation shields og stronger than metals (e.g. nanotubes)

Luckily carbon is plentiful in some asteroids.

Fuel though would be a problem...

Depends on the propulsion system. If we assume a fusion engine, then deuterium will be plentiful anywhere there is water. Again lots of that in the solar system.

Helium-3 would be even better, but availability in the quantities needed is less certain. Boron and Lithium are possible too, but much much more difficult to use and less common aswell.

If it uses something like anti-matter it is indeed very scarce.

All you need is a lot of metal and a spinning ship..

When the ship is accelerating and decelerating it will provide artificial gravity and when it starts coasting, you spin it up like you said.

Travelling to another solar system is certainly possible with technology that is not that far into the future (hopefully), but it will be an enourmous engineering challenging and extremely costly. Unless some unforseen techological breakthroughs occur it will unvolve trip times of decades at least and more likely centuries, even to nearby stars.

Douglas Adams have the perfect quote on just vast the distances between the stars are: ;)

"Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the drug store, but that's just peanuts to space."

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

If people wan't read more about interstellar travel I can highly recomend this website: http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/

While much of it is science fiction, but it also have a lot of very good real world information and links. I have spent countless hour browsing through that site. :tu:

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Hugh

QTFTLSAAADNMWCS (Quantum-Tunnelling-Faster-Than-Light-Spooky-Action-At-A-Distance-Non-Manned-Wormhole-Creating-Spaceships) are sent out to put the "arrival" gates near the Earth-like planets, then we just hop over there and explore 'em. ;)

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DieChecker

It would indeed be possible to recycle waste into food and oxygen for the crew. Actually it is probably more likely that such a spaceship would be made of some sort of carbonrich material, as they are more efficient as radiation shields og stronger than metals (e.g. nanotubes)

Luckily carbon is plentiful in some asteroids.

:tu:

Depends on the propulsion system. If we assume a fusion engine, then deuterium will be plentiful anywhere there is water. Again lots of that in the solar system.

Helium-3 would be even better, but availability in the quantities needed is less certain. Boron and Lithium are possible too, but much much more difficult to use and less common aswell.

If it uses something like anti-matter it is indeed very scarce.

Deuterium... Yeah, good idea. I think I've read that comets, the Moon, and probably Mars all have ice on them that contains usually three times the deuterium that Earth water does per unit of measure.

When the ship is accelerating and decelerating it will provide artificial gravity and when it starts coasting, you spin it up like you said.

Travelling to another solar system is certainly possible with technology that is not that far into the future (hopefully), but it will be an enourmous engineering challenging and extremely costly. Unless some unforseen techological breakthroughs occur it will unvolve trip times of decades at least and more likely centuries, even to nearby stars.

I never said the project would be cheap. :-* But, like I said, it is do-able with today's technology, as long as you have lots of time. Waiting on good fusion technology probably would be the best idea. Though we have ion drive technology today that could work pretty good. Just take a long time.

Douglas Adams have the perfect quote on just vast the distances between the stars are: ;)

"Space is big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the drug store, but that's just peanuts to space."

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

If people wan't read more about interstellar travel I can highly recomend this website: http://www.projectrh...ic_html/rocket/

While much of it is science fiction, but it also have a lot of very good real world information and links. I have spent countless hour browsing through that site. :tu:

I thought the quote was "... down the road to the chemist..."? British don't use the word "drugstore" AFAIK, they call it the "Chemist". And "Pharmacy" is used in both the US and UK, I think.

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy

I thought the quote was "... down the road to the chemist..."? British don't use the word "drugstore" AFAIK, they call it the "Chemist". And "Pharmacy" is used in both the US and UK, I think.

I copied it from another site, but after a little digging you are absolutely correct that the original quote is chemist. Must have been from a US edition ?

How can I possibly atone misquoting Douglas Adams ? :cry:

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Sundew

I would say, no, we will never visit, unless there actually is the development of a space warping technology. Even sending probes at 70% the speed of light, how will their fuel supply last 2000 years to make course adjustments? Will our civilization still be here then, or will it be destroyed, replaced by an A.I. civilization, or perhaps sent back to the stone age type lifestyle? This is the frustrating thing about the exoplanets, they are so far away we may never visit any of them, although 200 years ago who thought we would walk on the moon or visit Jupiter or Saturn, so it's possible we will discover some exotic tech capable of making the trip? Sadly I'll be long gone by then even if it happens.

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