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Researchers discovered alien megastructure?

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Finity

Making something that size would be completely impractical. The amount of resources you would need would more than is in an entire solar system, plus it would be so massive it would effect the star :P

Edited by Finity
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Sundew

But a Dyson spere is a hypothetical structure born out of science fiction. You can't take it as being in existence can you?

Many of yesterday's science fiction has become today's science fact. So who's to say what today's science fiction may foretell?

I still wonder how one could ever get enough raw material for a Dyson Sphere or similar structure. Presumably one cannot completely cannibalize one's own planet to make the structure and still have an interim place to live. Where would you get the vast amount of material needed? If you converted all the solid planets, moons and asteroids of our solar system and put the material roughly in Earth's orbit it would probably look like so much dust compared to the vast amount of area to be covered. And is it unlikely material could be brought in from outside one's own star system given the distances involved and the energy required.

Edited by Sundew
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Shouldthisexist

Making something that size would be completely impractical. The amount of resources you would need would more than is in an entire solar system, plus it would be so massive it would effect the star :P

How do you know the resources and the amount? Also considering having no idea of what it's made of, or if it's mechanical or not how do you know it would effect the star?

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toast

Making something that size would be completely impractical. The amount of resources you would need would more than is

in an entire solar system,

It is very unlikely that a (hypothetical) extraterrestrial civilization that would be able to build a Dyson sphere would not have

the technology to manage to harvest uncounted numbers of solar systems for the materials needed to build a Dyson sphere.

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Paranomali

Plus, what seems big and impractical to us, might not be to them

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Frank Merton

How do you know the resources and the amount? Also considering having no idea of what it's made of, or if it's mechanical or not how do you know it would effect the star?

Usually I avoid ideas that require radical improvements in technology, but in this case I have to agree -- materials science is finding things of large volume and considerable strength and in time would make such a thing possible with little more than cometary and asteroid material. It would not be a solid object as imagined in most SF portrayals of Dyson spheres, nor even solid like Ringworld, but a lattice work structure.

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Frank Merton

Plus, what seems big and impractical to us, might not be to them

I don't want to be too blunt, but this sort of statement strikes me as useless. We can project knowing the physics we know, and should limit ourselves to that.
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kartikg

Plus, what seems big and impractical to us, might not be to them

They might be manufacturing materials just a few atomic layers in width.

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MyOtherAccount

Some unknown natural process is and will remain the default, or maybe one of the things already ruled out will get reconsidered. I wouldn't hold my breath, but regardless it is interesting.

I think that will eventaly be the interpretation, as well. If some old star material collided with the star wouldn't the spectrum of the star remain fairly the same? Wouldn't the impact cause various debris to orbit, and perhaps even escape, the gravity of the sun? If so that would be the circumstances we think we have.

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Frank Merton

I think that will eventaly be the interpretation, as well. If some old star material collided with the star wouldn't the spectrum of the star remain fairly the same? Wouldn't the impact cause various debris to orbit, and perhaps even escape, the gravity of the sun? If so that would be the circumstances we think we have.

The problem with this is that the lifetime of the orbiting debris would be short and would be well over by the time the star was more than a few million years old, and this one is considerably older. It would take a planet sized object coming in, and for a stable star like this one that is not expected (and even if it happened our catching it during the short time the debris would be in orbit is extremely small).

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Sir Wearer of Hats

Plus, what seems big and impractical to us, might not be to them

Alternatively, they evolved in lower gravity and higher oxygen content and are 50 feet tall.

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Harte

How do you know they use "feet" to measure their heights?

:devil:

Harte

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Sir Wearer of Hats

True, sensible people use metres.

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Inversion5

So they are saying it is either a coincidental comet break up or alien civilization... The object could also be an artificial intelligence structure that goes around sucking star energy, like in the movie Oblivion (except in the movie it liked water) :w00t: Or maybe it could be an actual planet but the odd flux is them somehow communicating to anyone that can see for the first stage of contact :unsure2: Or, or, or...

Edited by dirtierdragoon4

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Inversion5

It's not just unlikely that they're notice us studying their star or Dyson sphere or whatever. It's pretty much impossible. All we're doing is looking at the light and radiation and its properties as it reaches us here at earth. They have no way of telling if the light that left their star 1480 years ago is being looked at by some distant alien civilisation (i.e. us) than if its just passing through our solar system unnoticed.

It could still look the same 1480 years later. If nothing can go faster than light, I wonder how fast dark can go? :) On another crazy note, they probably have crazy telescope tech where they can see us right now. Surely their is an equation they have to acurrately predict what we look like right now even if they are getting 1,000 year old light. If we can tell the life of a star from crazy distances, Im pretty sure an advance cow civilization with thumbs can tell how our lives are going right now. :alien: Or it could be dust farted out of a comet's butt.

Edited by dirtierdragoon4
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Inversion5

I don't want to be too blunt, but this sort of statement strikes me as useless. We can project knowing the physics we know, and should limit ourselves to that.

I was going to say entaglement communication ... :blush: But then no-communication therom limits me as well.

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Inversion5

if they happen to glance at us RIGHT NOW, they might get a first row seat to see the Krakatau volcano explode....

http://www.ees.lanl....tz/Krakatau.htm

I like the picture in the link showing the volcano smoke passing the planets atmosphere into space and spreading outwards as if it could get big enough to block the sun in wierd fluxes :whistle: Just like those geysers from that one moon from Jupiter that erupted with so much pressure it shot into space.

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MyOtherAccount

True, sensible people use metres.

Besides not all creatures have feet. Perhaps they are all thumbs.
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Harte

What about arthritis?

Harte

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Kurzweil

What about arthritis?

Harte

I didn't know you could measure arthritis. I measure my hemorrhoids by whether they touch the water when I sit down. Not sure how to conduct an arthritis scale.

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Harte

The arthrtic unit is equal to the distance a hand can be stretched out without being too painful.

Harte

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Kurzweil

I see. Thankfully I'm not arthritic yet.

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Inversion5

So they are saying it is either a coincidental comet break up or alien civilization... The object could also be an artificial intelligence structure that goes around sucking star energy, like in the movie Oblivion (except in the movie it liked water) Or maybe it could be an actual planet but the odd flux is them somehow communicating to anyone that can see for the first stage of contact Or, or, or...

... orc cloud or asteroid belt (someone had shown a pic of planet debris, so it looks like that considering diff. arrangement of objects). From a distance, I would think the orc cloud or asteriod belt would block the star in the manner we are seeing it, or gravitational anomaly like a Blackhole of some type mixed with a combination of other interesting galactical occurances dealing with nuclear decay...

Edited by dirtierdragoon4

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Frank Merton

Things like a broken-up comet and a bunch of asteroids have kinda been eliminated, although I don't completely understand the details, it seems that the these things are either in eccentric orbits to the plane of any planets (which would eliminate asteroids and so on) and there are really a lot of them and they are quite big. A comet swarm has been suggested, but no such thing is otherwise known.

Some sort of cloud would create an infrared signal and absorption lines. What I've seen indicates the first is not found and there is no mention of the second, I presume because no spectrum is yet available.

I will probably eat my words in a few months, but I have to say something artificial seems the easiest and simplest interpretation -- well looking just at the observations. The assumption of evolution of life is of course not a simple one.

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