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Was King Tut's sister also his wet nurse ?

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New findings have suggested that King Tutankhamun's half-sister may have suckled him when he was a baby.

One of the most famous Pharaohs in Egyptian history, King Tutankhamun was a mere child when he began his reign and died only 9 years later following a life plagued by ill-health and injury.

Read More: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/289697/was-king-tuts-sister-also-his-wet-nurse

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OverSword

Ewwwww!

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bubblykiss

They were rarely cross pollinating that bloodline so I see no reason why a bunch of incestuous inbreeders would not hook a sibling up to his sissies milk bag.

And to quote Sword...........ewwwwww!

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highdesert50

It does seem odd that a rather developed civilization was not aware of the issues surrounding inbreeding. Yet, the women were believed to be the carriers of the royal bloodline and therefore to marry within the bloodline was a way to insure its "purity." One could suppose that idea of purity may have even even extended to suckling within the family. A bit ironic that their notion of purity was just the opposite, genetic corruption.

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coolguy

Interesting if his parents where brother and sister maybe they though he would better and stronger, but that was not the case

Interesting if his parents where brother and sister maybe they though he would better and stronger, but that was not the case

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qxcontinuum

just stop guessing for god's sake.

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kmt_sesh

The theory is implausible and forces us to ignore a plethora of other evidence, and general knowledge of pharaonic traditions and ideology. As far as I can recall Zivie is a pretty solid researcher, so I don't know where this is coming from.

For instance, we known Meritaten was a king's daughter (of Akhenaten) and a king's wife (probably of Smenkhkare). Maya does not bear these titles in her tomb, and there was no cause or reason to hide such important titles. Indeed, the idea was to proclaim and preserve them—to help to "make the name live." I'm also not aware of "Maya" being a diminutive form of "Meritaten," although I can't be as sure on that score.

Similarities in appearance in wall paintings is actually nothing unusual. The reigning king set the standards and his family, courtiers, and servants followed the example in their own tomb paintings. It's well understood that Egyptian artistic representations (statues, wall paintings, stelae, etc.) do not reflect true portraiture in our sense of the word.

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