Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
UM-Bot

Could orbiting space junk cause World War 3 ?

Recommended Posts

UM-Bot

Scientists have warned that space debris collisions could have the potential to provoke armed conflict.

Space junk already represents a significant hazard to satellites and spacecraft, but now scientists in Russia have published a new report claiming that it could also have the potential to start a war.

Read More: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/290944/could-orbiting-space-junk-cause-world-war-3

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
clare256

Where are the Backyardigans when you need them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gecks

Soooooo Russias saying if one of their satellites gets damaged up there, rather than investigate we will just start bombing other countries?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Summerin1905

well we do have scientists for a reason... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pallidin

Soooooo Russias saying if one of their satellites gets damaged up there, rather than investigate we will just start bombing other countries?

Well, not really.

Of course they would investigate the cause, including the possibility that space junk or other space issues was the actual culprit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ell

What is the half life of this space junk?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chibadiba

What we need to do is when we send up something it would also contain some type of shielding to prevent space junk from hitting the object in the first place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
third_eye

To put it all in perspective ~

-

-

Dec 20, 2015 - Uploaded by Stuart Grey

Almost 20000 pieces of space debris are currently orbiting the Earth. This visualisation, created by Dr Stuart Grey

`

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pallidin

What is the half life of this space junk?

Good question. I don't know, but I think that some orbital debris "fall" into the earth's atmosphere and burn-up.

Other orbital debris tend to orbit the Earth for great periods of time... decades, centuries even.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FateAmeniableToChange

Id imagine that the half life of the debris would be a very long time indeed!. It being in a potentially permanent orbit due to earths gravitational pull. You would think that only another objects gravitational pull over time would perhaps change this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Waspie_Dwarf

Id imagine that the half life of the debris would be a very long time indeed!.

Not true, it can be as little as days or weeks if the orbit is low enough.

It being in a potentially permanent orbit due to earths gravitational pull. You would think that only another objects gravitational pull over time would perhaps change this.

That's not the case for objects in low Earth orbit. Even several hundred miles up the Earth's atmosphere, whilst extremely tenuous, still has an affect on orbiting objects. The friction between the extremely thin atmosphere and the satellite/debris causes a tiny slowing of the orbiting object. As it slows it moves into a slightly lower orbit. A lower orbit means that the atmosphere is slightly denser still. This in turn increases the friction and slows the object more. This process cpontinues until the object hits a part of the atmosphere which is dense enough to cause re-entry. Smaller objects will then simply burn up whilst some of the larger ones may make it to the ground (or more usually the ocean).

How long this process takes depends on the altitude the object is orbiting at and the shape/size of the object.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FateAmeniableToChange

Waspie_Dwarf what do you think is the best way for space agencies and governments to deal with this hazard?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.