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How did our ancestors consume raw meat ?


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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Raw meat is notoriously difficult to chew, so how did our prehistoric ancestors manage to do it ?

Unlike other carnivorous animals such as wolves which have teeth that can slice through raw meat, human teeth are primarily adapted for chewing and crushing like a mortar and pestle, meaning that we have to cook meat first so that our teeth can break it down when we eat it.

Read More: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/292410/how-did-our-ancestors-consume-raw-meat

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They pounded it with a rock ! ! !

Other that that, they discovered 'cooking' when a piece of meat fell into their camp fire. :-)

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Stone wielding apes had a hard time eating raw meat and yet modern zombies can easily devour entire people in only minutes nowadays.

But seriously, imagine the broadcast add for people to join the study "Like raw meat? Love chewing endlessly on uncooked-disease free goat sickles? Are you passionate about having dime sized electrodes plastered all over your face? Come make $50 with us!"

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Stone wielding apes had a hard time eating raw meat and yet modern zombies can easily devour entire people in only minutes nowadays.

But seriously, imagine the broadcast add for people to join the study "Like raw meat? Love chewing endlessly on uncooked-disease free goat sickles? Are you passionate about having dime sized electrodes plastered all over your face? Come make $50 with us!"

Hey man, 50 bucks is 50 bucks.

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With their mouth I imagine.

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With their mouth I imagine.

I was going to say "One bite at a time"... But yours is good too! :tu:

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I disagree with the conclusion of the academics that our ancestors had to develop technology to cut and/or pound meat before they, as a species, began to add meat to their diet.

The simplest way to add meat to our diet, would have been to let it mature for a couple of days before eating it. The initial process of decay breaks down the tough fibers in meat and makes it far easier to chew and digest. The only difficulty would be protecting the meat from scavengers or other predators, and that is where our ancestor's social behaviour gave them an advantage.

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The very first ones were probably thought of as a bunch of young too-smart-for-their-own-good upstart whippersnappers, with their danged newfangled ideas... Absolutely no respect for tradition!...

Sheesh... waving all this danged "fire" around all the time!.. They're likely to burn the whole danged world to cinders!... What's next? Taking the skins off of animals and wrapping them around us?...

Probably have us taking baths someday too...

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The very first ones were probably thought of as a bunch of young too-smart-for-their-own-good upstart whippersnappers, with their danged newfangled ideas... Absolutely no respect for tradition!...

Sheesh... waving all this danged "fire" around all the time!.. They're likely to burn the whole danged world to cinders!... What's next? Taking the skins off of animals and wrapping them around us?...

Probably have us taking baths someday too...

There as a story an old Analog written as business memos between cavemen about, fire, music, speaking and the wearing of clothing (dead animal skins!) and other disturbing changes that were altering the organizational structure of the caveman society.

I wish I could tell you the name or year or author, but that magazine is long gone now :(

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There as a story an old Analog written as business memos between cavemen about, fire, music, speaking and the wearing of clothing (dead animal skins!) and other disturbing changes that were altering the organizational structure of the caveman society.

I wish I could tell you the name or year or author, but that magazine is long gone now :(

Sounds like a fun read...

There are some other short stories and such from back in the day I really liked that I can't recall the names to either... One I especially liked was about a young angel that accidently bestowed "sainthood" on an advertising

executive (name mix up with a Tibetan Monk)... Hilarious story about how he tried to get the very brightly shining halo to go away... Can't for the life of me remember the name or the author though...

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Raw meat is notoriously difficult to chew, so how did our prehistoric ancestors manage to do it ?

Read More: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/292410/how-did-our-ancestors-consume-raw-meat

We pay the price (in meat) for our large brains. But a larger brain leaves less room for muscle to chew the meat, thus the need for meat cutting tools, which need a large brain for them to be made, and that large brain needs meat to fuel it...

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Strange. I have no problem eating raw meat! Though admittedly I get mine from the butcher rather than straight off the carcass.

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It seems the simplest way to figure out that cooking meat was advantages would be to stumble across a dead animal that had been burnt in a grass fire. The cooked meat would be softer to chew and wouldn't spoil as quickly. Grass fires not only killed the prey for you, they tenderized as well. Handy tool if you can master it.

In college (many many many years ago) we were asked to write a hypothesis on why early humans developed the habit of cooking. That was mine *shrug*

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I doubt they woulda ate raw meat just for the hell of. Prob only did it as a ritualistic thing or outta necessity. Especially if they had to track locate hunt and kill the animal

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I agree with the earlier poster that said early cooks must have been hero-worshipped.

Maybe even formed religions around them.

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if they couldn't chew it, they couldn't digest it. if you can't digest it then why would you eat it. just like chew gum it would just sit in your stomach, until it found its way out. thus they only reason humans would have statrteed eating meat is after the invention of cooking.

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Scientists believe that early men most likely started liking cooked meat by accident, from animals that died in forest fires..

Edited by TheGreatBeliever
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We were told at school it was the McDonalds started it. But this is Scotland. we claim everything.

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here is a question, how did we come about bread.. you chew grain it does not become dow it just becomes smaller so you can swallow it. making bread has to be something you set out to do.

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Wait a second, we can chew up some kinds of raw meat just fine. not all animals are tough and chewy. I have known someone that ate fresh raw meat while hunting probably just depends on the animal. Maybe wooly mammoths were tender but either way it's Likely our earliest ancestors would catch small prey, likely something with meat more edible.

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Maybe they put the meat on a rock and beat it with another rock to soften it up

Edited by coolguy
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