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seeder

Life in the universe is almost DEFINITE

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seeder

Intelligent life elsewhere in the universe is almost DEFINITE, say scientists

ALIENS almost definitely exist within our universe, a team of scientists have sensationally claimed.

A research paper revisited the famous Drake Equation and concluded the chances are even higher than the original formula suggested.

In 1961, scientist Frank Drake came up with an equation outlining the variables and chances of an alien civilisation in the universe.

It took into consideration factors such as the rate of formation of stars suitable for the development of life in surrounding planets and the number of planets per solar system.

While there is no unique solution for the equation, it is widely regarded as meaning the chances of finding life out there is probable

http://www.express.co.uk/news/science/666623/alien-exist-confirmed-nasa-kepler-universe-drake-equation

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bubblykiss

The universe is big and old.

Life must exist in great abundance out there. Intelligent life as well.

I just hope that they have discovered a better way to cook tripe than munudo already.

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freetoroam

It does not take a scientist to tell us this. Anyone with a bit of interest in the Universe would think this.

But once we have agreed on possible life in the Universe, this is where the ideas start to differ = greatly.

We humans who believe in life out there have ideas ranging between:

52cb22af57034.jpg

and this:

Festival-288527.jpg

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StarMountainKid

There is life everywhere in the Universe, especially on a Saturday night.

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theotherguy

The article seems to state that the researchers were looking at the chance that life has ever existed somewhere else, not just whether it exists now. They are including extinctions, catastrophes, and what might be there now. This doesn't significantly affect the Drake equation beyond adding the variable of time. The variables at the end are still unsolved.

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seeder

I must admit this ties in with my own views. Maybe I wouldn't go so far as to say there is LOTS of life elsewhere, or even amazingly intelligent life, but in our own solar system there is yet another Mars rover going up to look for life, plus there is always the mystery of what's under the ice on Europa

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Skulduggery

It's a jungle out there.

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bison

The article seems to state that the researchers were looking at the chance that life has ever existed somewhere else, not just whether it exists now. They are including extinctions, catastrophes, and what might be there now. This doesn't significantly affect the Drake equation beyond adding the variable of time. The variables at the end are still unsolved.

Yes, we still don't know the longevity of a civilization in space. It's tempting, though, to think that civilization confers a collective survival advantage.

If the asteroid that destroyed the dinosaurs struck in our time, instead, we might, as things currently stand, be able to save ourselves. Given a few more generations of technical progress, surviving such a threat might be rendered almost certain.

It appears that the longer a civilization can keep on progressing, the more likely it can survive indefinitely. Perhaps a few of those ancient civilizations in space continued to prosper, became virtually immortal, and spread their influence throughout the galaxy.

It could be that we will eventually encounter their descendants. It might be that we'd be able to learn some valuable lessons from them, about how a civilization can keep on living and growing.

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Hugh

Life finds a way to exist, even in harsh conditions of heat, cold and pressure.

The universe is a very, very large place, and has been around for a very, very long time.

I have no doubt that it is teeming with life of all kinds.

The biggest barrier to all the different life forms finding out about each other and meeting up is the huge distance which separates them.

I believe that there are ways to travel the vast distances quickly that we have yet to discover, such as bending space, using wormholes or black holes somehow.

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Sweetpumper

That's quite a stretch 'o scientists. Way to go out on a limb.

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seeder

Let no-one lose sight of the fact LIFE..... could be as simple as grass....algae...

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imrunningthismonkeyfarm

Let no-one lose sight of the fact LIFE..... could be as simple as grass....algae...

Could be seeder. Could be as diverse as Earth. Could be billions of planets & moons capable of supporting life on every level, on land, air & sea. A lot of organisms never have to change. But a changing environment results in evolution.

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PersonFromPorlock

Not exactly news. I recall an article in, I think, Analog magazine that argued that every starting value plugged into the Drake equation resulted in a Universe that was packed with intelligent life... and that was maybe 40 years ago.

Which makes Fermi's question - "Where is everybody?" - all the more pertinent. Because if nobody's there, and they don't seem to be, we are, arguably, out of physics and into theology.

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seeder

one day...we will know!

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Skulduggery

I think the universe has lots of life but it's spread out at a distance and there would also be a lot of life no human would want to encounter in reality. One time I had a dream about aliens (a subject I'd normally never dream about) but these things were like oversised ticks and when a few finally made their way here by simply travelling through space, their natural habitat, they sucked atoms straight outta things for atomic energy. No time flat. A lot of cats died in that dream.

Salty stuff.

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Hammerclaw

Klaatu barada nikto.

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Quaentum

Life in the universe is 100% definite....We Exist.

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Lilly

Life in the universe is 100% definite....We Exist.

Very true...but I have this nagging feeling they mean life other than us.

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XenoFish

There is always the possibility that life existed before earth was around. And I think something will pop up after we're gone. Who knows, all those earth like planets might have/had life on them. Microbial or Complex who truly knows. Maybe all those stories of ghost, angels, and demons are a type of strange life-form? That exist right outside our perception.

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Shouldthisexist

IN A DISTANT GALAXY:

Attention to all civilizations of NGC1300, our scientists are certain that no other life exists in the universe. Conclusions are aliens don't exist but on the bright side we are awesome!

Edited by Shouldthisexist

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skookum

Given the distances involved verses the speed of light etc, we have barely spoken our first words in our Galaxy. It will more than like 100's more probably 1000's of years before anything will detect our first very basic signals.

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universal skeptic

The possibilities are endless.

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freetoroam

A new study? by them maybe.

I can not see anything here which is new news.

It would be naive to think we are the only life in this universe, you do not have to be a rocket scientist to work that one out.

Edited by freetoroam
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StarMountainKid

I still think that the vast distance between us and the nearest planet with intelligent life on it precludes mutual visitation or communication. Even very advanced technologies must obey the laws of physics. I'm not convinced there are any shortcuts.

Some nano-bots may have come our way, but I would think we would be uninteresting to any advanced species in the galaxy. They would have long passed our level of development, we'd be just some primitive tribe devoted to self-conflict.

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skookum

I still think that the vast distance between us and the nearest planet with intelligent life on it precludes mutual visitation or communication. Even very advanced technologies must obey the laws of physics. I'm not convinced there are any shortcuts.

Some nano-bots may have come our way, but I would think we would be uninteresting to any advanced species in the galaxy. They would have long passed our level of development, we'd be just some primitive tribe devoted to self-conflict.

Even our laws of physics as we understand them may not be such a hurdle for ET. Who is to say that that an advanced alien civilization doesn't have have a natural lifespan of hundreds, maybe thousands of years. We consider a potential round trip to Mars in a few years acceptable for our life span. An alien species that may live for thousands of years would probably think a round trip of 100's of years acceptable.

Truth is all our theories are based on our planet.

Looking for alien life we need to know the following questions.

Is life a freak event?

Even if cellular begins how often does it transform into more complex life?

How often does more complex life turn into intelligent life?

Finding some kind of life in our solar system would go a long way to answer the ET question. Hopefully in my lifetime we will find cellular life, up until then the possibility that the Earth is a freak planet will remain.

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