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Still Waters

Man-eating Nile crocs confirmed in Florida

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Still Waters

DNA tests have confirmed that three man-eating Nile crocodiles have been found living in Florida's swamps.

Unlike local alligators, the species preys on humans and is thought to be responsible for up to 200 deaths a year at home in sub-Saharan Africa.

It is possible more of the beasts are at large in the state, experts say.

It is not known for certain how they reached the US. "They didn't swim from Africa," said University of Florida herpetologist Kenneth Krysko.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/36349031

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Keel M.

My bet is that they were smuggled here on a ship. That's how many non-native species get here.

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Farmer77

Dude I just today read about west african nile monitor lizards having established a breeding population in Florida. Nasty place

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Lilly

This is not good, not at all.

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DeeSember

Someone brought them home from a trip, thinking they were cute until they started biting fingers. Then the cute little snappers got flushed down the toilet. Oh wait, I am thinking about an old movie about alligators in the sewers. :passifier:

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bubblykiss

As if I needed another reason to never travel to Florida.

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Ashotep

There are all kinds of invasive species in the US and most of them are in Florida it seems. They have a monkey colony there that is infected with a form of herpes that is deadly to humans. Wouldn't want to live there.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/gone-viral/os-herpes-monkeys-florida-091713-post.html

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Grandpa Greenman

Oh joy, just what we need. Something else for the fool tourist to feed. Big alligators will eat humans if they get a hold of one. Usually people feed them and then start seeing humans as food. African crocs are just so big it makes it easier for them to get a hold of you.

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Barkinghorse

the Australian salt water crocodile is the largest in the world. And they do target humans.

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Keel M.

There are all kinds of invasive species in the US and most of them are in Florida it seems. They have a monkey colony there that is infected with a form of herpes that is deadly to humans. Wouldn't want to live there.

Florida is fast becoming the Australia of the US. All kinds of deadly **** down there.

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Why not

I wonder if they taste as good as the regular FL gator? It's kinda hard to beat Sunday football with deep fried gator tail, raw oysters, and a few cold ones.

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TonopahRick

There is also a population of American crocodiles in Florida. I've never heard of them attacking humans though but that doesn't mean they won't if hungry.

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Sundew

My bet is that they were smuggled here on a ship. That's how many non-native species get here.

Actually, I went to a reptile show down in Florida about five years ago. And what did they have for sale? Among many other things: baby Nile Crocs. But you had to have a special permit/license to buy/keep them, which means regulation by the State regarding enclosures, feeding, etc. It is unlikely that any of these are the escapees because there is a State paper trail. However, Florida wildlife was not always so heavily regulated and also Hurricane Andrew was reported to have destroyed the Reptile House at the Miami Zoo (I can confirm this but have heard rumors). The hurricane is also likely responsive for the Burmese Pythons: there was also supposedly a breeding facility that was destroyed. They were breeding them is S. Florida because there is less heating of the facility given their short and mild winters. Weather, in fact, is responsible for a good may animal escapes in Florida: Around Tampa and in the Miami area, torrential rain overflowed in-ground fish ponds for tropicals and at least some species like Plecostomus catfish established themselves in local waterways. I also know of one case where the State forced a fish breeder to vacate his family's land in the Everglades to expand the State Park. The man's family had been raising fish for aquarium enthusiasts for decades. Before he was forced off, he left them a going away present: he dynamited one side of all his ponds and let them spill into the waterways. Then there are those who simply release or lose the occasional snake, iguana, monitor etc.

Any trip to a park or garden in South Florida will yield several exotic reptiles if you look for them (or even an Arby's Parking lot, where I spotted Bahamian Curly Tailed Lizards), I saw at least five exotic species at Fairchild Tropical Gardens. Likely there were more I did not see.

So as you can see, it's a combination of many factors, but just because a few individuals are found also does not mean an established population. Relatively few exotics establish themselves, even in Florida.

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Sundew

There is also a population of American crocodiles in Florida. I've never heard of them attacking humans though but that doesn't mean they won't if hungry.

One girl was bitten in the Florida Keys by one recently, the only recorded case. She bumped into it in murky water, a few stitches but otherwise she was okay. The American Crocodile, at least in Florida, is not known to be a man-eater, But they get quite large and people feed them in places like Jamaica and Costa Rica which is not a good idea.

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pallidin

I was born and raised in Florida, eventually left, but I've seen many crocs there, but not too close-up, mostly while I was driving by canals and such.

Edited by pallidin

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Eldorado
On 21/05/2016 at 9:27 PM, Lilly said:

This is not good, not at all.

Not even for the shoes, bags and belts?

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paperdyer

This helps me prove my theory in my own mind at least...The only good croc/gator is a dead one.  Now we have more reason to wipe them out.  Not very PC but not all species deserve to survive, us included as the Nile crocs believe.

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