Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

Cheese discovered in 340-year-old shipwreck


UM-Bot
 Share

Recommended Posts

 
Quote


"I don't know if anyone is going to taste it," said Einarsson.

Give it to Mikey.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Inhaling the fumes would probably be enough.  Talk about aged chedda..... :w00t:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Imagine... they may be able to use the cheese mold to create a new range of cheeses... I am still impressed by the cave cheeses.. http://www.wookey.co.uk/cave-aged-cheese/          and   http://www.cibodeli.com/cheese/sheeps-milk-cheese/pasteurised/pecorino-crotonese-matured-caves

 

Quote

Some Blue Cheese History

Lovers of blue cheese have included Pliny the Elder, Charlemagne and Casanova.

Most of these cheeses were originally produced in caves in their respective areas, where the mold was naturally present. This combined with the unique nutrients that the mold grew on in the caves affected the flavor, texture and blue-green color of the mold in each of these cheeses.  In the beginning, this was most likely discovered by accident when cheeses were stored in the caves, and they developed mold.  Then someone decided to taste the cheese that others might have thought to be ruined, and realized how exquisite the taste had become.

Some blue cheeses, such as Danablue, were developed later as less expensive alternatives to the higher priced Roquefort cheese from France.

 

 

 

  http://www.foodreference.com/html/artbluecheese.html

... and this mold is said to have health benefits... http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2249568/Could-Roquefort-GOOD-heart-Blue-cheese-anti-inflammatory-properties-guard-cardiovascular-disease.html

 

 

Edited by crystal sage
just adding info :)
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Likely Guy said:

It's the 340 year old rule, ..."it's still good!"

...penicillin is made from mould so maybe it still is good. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (IP: Staff) ·
3 minutes ago, Leto_loves_melange said:

...penicillin is made from mould so maybe it still is good. 

Cheese mod and bread mold are a wee bit different.  But I doubt I'd sample a 300+ year old sample of either one, ew.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, rashore said:

Cheese mod and bread mold are a wee bit different.  But I doubt I'd sample a 300+ year old sample of either one, ew.

...I'll take your word on it. Either way i wouldn't be game enough to try it either.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would consider to eat it only after someone else tried first and if there really, really, nothing else to eat...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember reading somewhere that the ancient Swedes were the first to make cheese from cockroach milk.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would have tried it on the spot. The bacteria that makes cheese we use in veggies. I had a batch of peppers on the counter without any other preservation other than lacto fermentation and they were still good after 2 years.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I had some 3 year old mature cheddar a few weeks back and had to eat it in 3 days of opening, that's what you call precision timing.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

340 year-old cheese and a bottle of cockroaches milk! A perfect Saturday dinner menu. ;)

 
Edited by jethrofloyd
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.