Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Thanato

When was America Great?

327 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Thanato

Trumps slogan... To make America Great Again? When was it greater then it is right now? In terms of equality, never. In terms of human rights, never. In terms of economic strength, never. In terms of Military strength, never.

 

yes there are problems with your nation, but those problems will not be decided through violent divisiveness.

can anyone explain to me how Trump is even an attractive political leader?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
questionmark

Define great. That has a lot of meanings.

According to some it was great when the WASP had the say and all other were forcefully shut up...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanato
4 minutes ago, questionmark said:

Define great. That has a lot of meanings.

According to some it was great when the WASP had the say and all other were forcefully shut up...

That's the problem. There is t a definition out there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
questionmark
1 minute ago, Thanato said:

That's the problem. There is t a definition out there. 

Well, if you mean "Great" as in certain con-man's propaganda that means an America that never was and never will be. Mostly because he knows he can't deliver.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
third_eye

I think the key here is as long as it feels great it is great ...

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
simplybill

That's a tough question. I don't think America has ever been great in its entirety, though various aspects of American society have been beacons of Hope to the rest of the world. 

I personally feel that America was truly great between the years 1944 to around 1963. Hard times (The Great Depression and WW2) have a way of strengthening society, and in helping to reduce the imagined differences between people. The government ruined all of that with the introduction of its flawed social reforms.

I think a good follow-up question might be:

When were the American People truly great?

That's a question that I've often pondered. We've had periods of tremendous influence for good in the world that didn't involve guns and bombs. At this point in history, I'm afraid we may not be able to return to that.

 

Edited by simplybill
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dumbledore the Awesome

From about 1945 up to the beginning of the sixties, I'd say. It all went downhill after that. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Leonardo
42 minutes ago, Otto von Pickelhaube said:

From about 1945 up to the beginning of the sixties, I'd say. It all went downhill after that. 

And that was largely because WWII had bankrupted many of the other developed nations. America was in a real position of strength due to the indebtedness towards it incurred by many other nations during, and immediately following, that war. So, in Trump's logic perhaps he intends starting another world war to regain that indebtedness and "Make America Great Again"?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gromdor

Sounds like we are only great when everyone else sucks.  When other countries are doing as well as us.  We aren't "Great" anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aquatus1

America was pretty great for a while for the people that want it to be great again.  It was considerably less great for the people that never want to see those times return.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot

The past always looks better than the present. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
questionmark
4 minutes ago, shadowsot said:

The past always looks better than the present. 

in the mind of those with Alzheimer's, yes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dumbledore the Awesome
34 minutes ago, Leonardo said:

And that was largely because WWII had bankrupted many of the other developed nations. America was in a real position of strength due to the indebtedness towards it incurred by many other nations during, and immediately following, that war. So, in Trump's logic perhaps he intends starting another world war to regain that indebtedness and "Make America Great Again"?

No, that's Hillary's policy. She hasn't thoughtt it through in those kind of economic terms,it's just her hobby. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Leonardo
5 minutes ago, Otto von Pickelhaube said:

No, that's Hillary's policy. She hasn't thoughtt it through in those kind of economic terms,it's just her hobby. 

That would make Trump more patriotic than Hillary, because he would want war to "Make America Great Again", not just to have a war.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
simplybill

As a 35-year Union member, I'm hoping 'Mr. Trump the Businessman' will concentrate on returning manufacturing jobs to America. It will take an enormous amount of negotiating to draw Unions and Management back into a successful balance, but I believe Mr. Trump might have enough business savvy to do so.  

Yes, I know he's moved his garment manufacturing overseas, but that wouldn't necessarily be a permanent situation if labor relations and tax reform issues can be ironed out here.

I personally would be happier if the past 8 years had been under a Romney administration. As an American worker, I prefer a knowledgeable businessperson over a social reformer. True equality flourishes more in the workplace than in academics and community organizations.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dumbledore the Awesome
1 minute ago, Leonardo said:

That would make Trump more patriotic than Hillary, because he would want war to "Make America Great Again", not just to have a war.

You know it makes sense. USA! USA! USA!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
questionmark
2 minutes ago, simplybill said:

As a 35-year Union member, I'm hoping 'Mr. Trump the Businessman' will concentrate on returning manufacturing jobs to America. It will take an enormous amount of negotiating to draw Unions and Management back into a successful balance, but I believe Mr. Trump might have enough business savvy to do so.  

Yes, I know he's moved his garment manufacturing overseas, but that wouldn't necessarily be a permanent situation if labor relations and tax reform issues can be ironed out here.

I personally would be happier if the past 8 years had been under a Romney administration. As an American worker, I prefer a knowledgeable businessperson over a social reformer. True equality flourishes more in the workplace than in academics and community organizations.

6 out of 10 jobs were lost due to automation, not to somebody going somewhere else. Even if the factories return: the jobs won't.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
supervike

I dunno....Maybe we were great Sept 10, 2001.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gingitsune

Make America great again. Trump said it, but in their days Mr Clinton and Regan used the same words. So this great America is way far back. I would say it lasted from the end of world war two to the mid 1970s. French people call them "les trente glorieuses", the glorious thirty. In these years, the middle class rose, the science was improving everything, medicine was improving by leaps and bonds, machines were everywhere, humans were reaching for the moon, fridge, electric stove, washer and drier spawn in every house, every family owned a car, babies were booming and to top it all, United States of America was leading the way.

How to achieve that kind of growth again? We needs a new industrial revolutions. The old formula won't work twice, we need to find a new recipe.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
simplybill
18 minutes ago, questionmark said:

6 out of 10 jobs were lost due to automation, not to somebody going somewhere else. Even if the factories return: the jobs won't.

Then we switch from making cars to making the robots that make the cars. We train people to repair the robots and keep them in operating condition, and we train people to write the software for the computers that run the robots. 

Most importantly: we provide tax incentives to businesses that begin a sensible Profit-Sharing program for the employees.   That's the best way to eliminate the us-against-them mentality that plagues American labor-management relations. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot
16 minutes ago, questionmark said:

6 out of 10 jobs were lost due to automation, not to somebody going somewhere else. Even if the factories return: the jobs won't.

I do Factory and production work. A lot of outsourced jobs came back recently simply due to there being little in the way of quality control on manufacturing in these places. 

 We'd get steel that had visible crystals in it that was to fragile to run. 

 Sure, it's cheaper to have it made overseas, but that's without factoring in loss of product due to these issues. 

 QC and employee safety laws are there for a reason, even if they can be problematic. Running to places where things are cheaper, well you loose a lot of corners that way.

 Our product started out as almost entirely steel, but these days we mostly do aluminum and a little brass and copper. Most of the stuff we used to do has been automated, and we've had to adapt or go out of business. 

 We used to need a crew of between 10 to 20 per shift, but these days even with more work we can barely squeeze in 4-5 people per shift. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
questionmark
13 minutes ago, simplybill said:

Then we switch from making cars to making the robots that make the cars. We train people to repair the robots and keep them in operating condition, and we train people to write the software for the computers that run the robots. 

Most importantly: we provide tax incentives to businesses that begin a sensible Profit-Sharing program for the employees.   That's the best way to eliminate the us-against-them mentality that plagues American labor-management relations. 

The Chinese just bought one of the world's biggest robot maker (unless the EU still throws a spanner into the works), good luck competing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jarocal
35 minutes ago, questionmark said:

6 out of 10 jobs were lost due to automation, not to somebody going somewhere else. Even if the factories return: the jobs won't.

So your saying we shouldn't effect policies to regain almost half (40% using your numbers) of the manufacturing jobs lost due to automation/outsourcing?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
questionmark
Just now, Jarocal said:

So your saying we shouldn't effect policies to regain almost half (40% using your numbers) of the manufacturing jobs lost due to automation/outsourcing?

 

We should, instead of playing the hare and turtle game, concentrate on something with a future. Not on investing money in jobs that are becoming more and more obsolete.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Leonardo
49 minutes ago, simplybill said:

As a 35-year Union member, I'm hoping 'Mr. Trump the Businessman' will concentrate on returning manufacturing jobs to America. It will take an enormous amount of negotiating to draw Unions and Management back into a successful balance, but I believe Mr. Trump might have enough business savvy to do so.  

Yes, I know he's moved his garment manufacturing overseas, but that wouldn't necessarily be a permanent situation if labor relations and tax reform issues can be ironed out here.

I personally would be happier if the past 8 years had been under a Romney administration. As an American worker, I prefer a knowledgeable businessperson over a social reformer. True equality flourishes more in the workplace than in academics and community organizations.

Spoken like a true shop-floor representative. Management must love you!

And I mean that sincerely, management loves anyone who promotes the workplace as being a "bastion of equality", because it makes their job of lording it over you so much easier!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.