Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Waspie_Dwarf

Juno: Jupiter’s North Pole

11 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Waspie_Dwarf

Jupiter’s North Pole Unlike Anything Encountered in Solar System

Quote

NASA’s Juno spacecraft has sent back the first-ever images of Jupiter’s north pole, taken during the spacecraft’s first flyby of the planet with its instruments switched on. The images show storm systems and weather activity unlike anything previously seen on any of our solar system’s gas-giant planets.

Juno successfully executed the first of 36 orbital flybys on Aug. 27 when the spacecraft came about 2,500 miles (4,200 kilometers) above Jupiter’s swirling clouds. The download of six megabytes of data collected during the six-hour transit, from above Jupiter’s north pole to below its south pole, took one-and-a-half days. While analysis of this first data collection is ongoing, some unique discoveries have already made themselves visible.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Nnicolette

The wailing planet. Will this change the notion that radiowaves signify et?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Waspie_Dwarf
2 hours ago, Nnicolette said:

The wailing planet. Will this change the notion that radiowaves signify et?

No, because there is no notion that radio waves signify E.T.

It has been known for decades that many objects in the cosmos naturally produce radiowaves, including Jupiter. That is why we have radio astronomers doing radio astronomy using radio telescopes. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merc14

Truly amazing to look at!  I wonder what the size of those eddy like storms is?

Jupiter's polar cloud tops

Edited by Merc14
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Astra.

It's stunning to see this giant gas planet in a new light by learning more about it. The infrared image of Jupiter's southern aurora is truly amazing.

I realise that Juno's main purpose is to map out things like Jupiter's interior and magnetic field - so most of its instrumentation is geared towards measuring the various aspects of this etc....rather than only taking pictures.

But since Jupiter has a very high and harsh radiation environment - I was wondering how long the visual camera will survive it's number of planned orbits ?... since radiation can rapidly degrade and / or destroy things like electronics.. even when shielded.

Even so - here's hoping that all continues to go smoothly...by discovering more about these wonderful and exciting planets.. great job NASA!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Derek Willis

I spent some time staring at the images of Jupiter and I started seeing the faces of elves and imps. I wonder if my wife slipped something into my coffee!?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merc14
3 hours ago, Astra. said:

It's stunning to see this giant gas planet in a new light by learning more about it. The infrared image of Jupiter's southern aurora is truly amazing.

I realise that Juno's main purpose is to map out things like Jupiter's interior and magnetic field - so most of its instrumentation is geared towards measuring the various aspects of this etc....rather than only taking pictures.

But since Jupiter has a very high and harsh radiation environment - I was wondering how long the visual camera will survive it's number of planned orbits ?... since radiation can rapidly degrade and / or destroy things like electronics.. even when shielded.

Even so - here's hoping that all continues to go smoothly...by discovering more about these wonderful and exciting planets.. great job NASA!

I wondered teh same thing and came upon this very detailed article on the Junocam here http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2016/06090600-what-to-expect-from-junocam.html

Near the middle they say that Junocam was designed to survive 8 orbits and then, most likely, slowly degrade:

Since it's not a science instrument, JunoCam wasn't required to be heavily shielded enough to guarantee its survival throughout the prime science mission. It is shielded, but the Jupiter radiation environment is a nasty one, and JunoCam will suffer radiation damage over time. It was designed to withstand 8 Jupiter orbits, which roughly coincides with the end of 2016. Still, it's more likely to be a slow death (a steady increase in noise) than a sudden failure. We'll probably see degradation of the quality of JunoCam images in 2017, but hopefully the camera will hold up well enough to continue to operate for many more science orbits and voting rounds before Jupiter finally kills the camera. If we're lucky, JunoCam will survive until February 21, 2018, when Juno will plunge into Jupiter, on Perijove 37.

 

 

Edited by Merc14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nnicolette
On 9/3/2016 at 11:32 AM, Waspie_Dwarf said:

No, because there is no notion that radio waves signify E.T.

It has been known for decades that many objects in the cosmos naturally produce radiowaves, including Jupiter. That is why we have radio astronomers doing radio astronomy using radio telescopes. 

I wasnt saying that ANY radio waves signify that, but that is what is being searched for right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Waspie_Dwarf
18 minutes ago, Nnicolette said:

I wasnt saying that ANY radio waves signify that,

That's EXACTLY what your post implied.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Astra.
20 hours ago, Merc14 said:

I wondered teh same thing and came upon this very detailed article on the Junocam here http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2016/06090600-what-to-expect-from-junocam.html

Near the middle they say that Junocam was designed to survive 8 orbits and then, most likely, slowly degrade:

Since it's not a science instrument, JunoCam wasn't required to be heavily shielded enough to guarantee its survival throughout the prime science mission. It is shielded, but the Jupiter radiation environment is a nasty one, and JunoCam will suffer radiation damage over time. It was designed to withstand 8 Jupiter orbits, which roughly coincides with the end of 2016. Still, it's more likely to be a slow death (a steady increase in noise) than a sudden failure. We'll probably see degradation of the quality of JunoCam images in 2017, but hopefully the camera will hold up well enough to continue to operate for many more science orbits and voting rounds before Jupiter finally kills the camera. If we're lucky, JunoCam will survive until February 21, 2018, when Juno will plunge into Jupiter, on Perijove 37.

 

 

Cheers Merc for the information. I haven't had much time of late to chase further details down concerning Junocam's expected longevity etc... lets hope she goes the whole nine yards before she fades out.

Can't wait for the many more discoveries they will happen upon concerning this gas giant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
paperdyer

The pics made it look like Jupiter is trying to ignite or it has one huge forest fire going on.;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.