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The Storr Lochs Monster Surfaces


Claire.

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The Storr Lochs Monster Surfaces

Paleontology is not a first dug, first served science. Research interests, logistical technicalities, and more dictate what fossils are cleaned up, studied, and published on in what order, and while some field finds are so momentous that they jump to the front of the queue, other fossils are on a slow burn. The Storr Lochs Monster is one of the more patient fossils.

The marine reptile, which does not have an official scientific name yet, was discovered in 1966 by Norrie Gillies, the manager of the SSE Storr Lochs Power Station on the Isle of Skye. The old bones were soon excavated and carried back to the National Museums Scotland, and that's where they've rested for the last 50 years. Now a multi-institution team of paleontologists from the museum, the University of Edinburgh, and others are going to be giving the fossil the attention its been waiting for.

Read more: Scientific American

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So I guess there is still a slim chance Nessie is alive and well.  At least we now have proof the critters were there at one time.

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1 hour ago, paperdyer said:

So I guess there is still a slim chance Nessie is alive and well.  At least we now have proof the critters were there at one time.

The same slim chance that pterosaurs and velociraptors still roam the Highlands ..... ;)  

The fossil found on Skye was a sea creature.   So no more likely to inhabit loch Ness today that a blue whale.  Or a woolly mammoth ....

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How often myths inspire the greater results. Without our myths we would be rather dull creatures immersed in mundane  realities without belief and destiny.

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