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Blue Origin Announces 270-Foot-Tall Rocket


Claire.
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Blue Origin Announces Huge 270-Foot-Tall Rocket

 Billionaire entrepreneur Jeff Bezos announced this morning (Sept. 12) a massive new reusable rocket family in development for his private spaceflight company Blue Origin. The rocket, called New Glenn, will be used to launch satellites and people into space, according to Bezos. In a newsletter from Blue Origin, Bezos unveiled an artist's concept of two- and three-stage versions of the New Glenn rocket. Both will stand taller than SpaceX's Falcon Heavy and United Launch Alliance's Delta IV Heavy, and the three-stage approaches the stature of NASA's Saturn V that boosted humans to the moon.

Read more: Live Science

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Article says these rockets are smaller the the Saturn V but considering advancements in technology I assume the new rockets are more efficient with better propulsion? Or is it a case of theres no replacement for displacement and the Saturn V was better?

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Define "better".

The Saturn V was larger and more powerful but that doesn't mean that modern rocket engines are not as good. Also progress in materials technology means that payloads are frequently smaller and lighter than they were in the '60's & 70's so a larger, more powerful launch vehicle is not necessarily needed.

That said, when NASA's SLS flies in 2018 it will be the most powerful rocket ever launched.

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Working and living in space is all good, but we need a better way to get back down to Earth other than coming down in a "glider"   There are only so many spots with enough open land for the landing strips.

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·
3 hours ago, paperdyer said:

There are only so many spots with enough open land for the landing strips.

At any given time there are a million people in the air in massive airliners and you don't think there  is enough room to land an occasional spacecraft!!!

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9 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

At any given time there are a million people in the air in massive airliners and you don't think there  is enough room to land an occasional spacecraft!!!

No, I'm more worried about landing the occasional glider at our airports with all the other traffic.  If seems the landing strip is longer for the Shuttle than the normal jumbo jet.  We have enough near misses with aircraft that is powered much less a glider that has to come down and can't circle the airport until there's room.  I don't have that much faith.  Murphy is alive and well and will get you eventually.

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·
11 hours ago, paperdyer said:

No, I'm more worried about landing the occasional glider at our airports with all the other traffic.

I repeat there are a million people in the air at any given time and you think there isn't the capacity for a few more landings. Can you really not see the foolishness of your argument?

Let's look at the second enormous problem with your "logic". Who exactly is landing like a glider? 

Soyuz, Orion, SpaceX Dragon, Boeing CST-100 and Blue Origin's New Shepard are all capsules.

Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser will use the existing Kennedy Space Center shuttle runway.

Virgin Galactic will take off and land at the purpose built Spaceport America in New Mexico.

As well as Spaceport America there are also two other spaceports in the USA just waiting for customers. A little strange considering your claim that there is no room.

Given that no company currently plans to "land the occasional glider at an airport", there really seems to be no factual basis to your argument.

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  • 5 months later...
Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Blue Origin details new rocket’s capabilities, signs first orbital customer

Quote

Amazon.com’s Jeff Bezos revealed new details of his space company’s reusable orbital-class booster Tuesday, releasing an animation illustrating the rocket’s liftoff from Cape Canaveral and announcing a contract with Eutelsat to put a commercial communications satellite on one of the launcher’s first missions.

Speaking at the Satellite 2017 industry conference in Washington, Bezos said Blue Origin’s towering New Glenn rocket, named for pioneering astronaut John Glenn, could launch by 2020 and be reused up to 100 times.

arrow3.gif  Read More: Spaceflight Now

 

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