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One-man's search for Siberia's Nessie


Still Waters
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Braving temperatures of below minus 50C, and with no other living soul in a radius of 150 kilometres, this 32 year old adventurer walked for ten days to reach one of Russia's most remote and mysterious lakes in a one-man search for the monster that is reputed to inhabit its deep waters. 

He has regularly met brown bears roaming these wild shores, although they are now ready for hibernation, and wolves are never far away.

But it is a different beast he is seeking to see and chronicle - Siberia's own Loch Ness monster.

http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/features/f0268-new-signs-of-siberias-nessie-a-dark-creature-in-the-lake-and-broken-fishing-nets/

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Seems like every continent has it own loch Nessy

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Well, whatever it is it's obviously not an air breather.

Dog fish in the lake? I think they mean catfish. You won't get salt water species in a lake at an elevation of over a KM and about 300 KM inland. Nor relict populations of marine mammals.

Plus, it's a big lake, but not huge.

Siberia land of tall tales. 

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Some Russians sit around and drink Vodka all day.

Others search for Mythical beasts. He's on a mission. I admire his tenacity. I envy him.

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  • 1 month later...
On 06/11/2016 at 2:01 AM, Mark56 said:

Some Russians sit around and drink Vodka all day.

Others search for Mythical beasts. He's on a mission. I admire his tenacity. I envy him.

He could be hiding from himself, same as the vodka drinkers and prozac swallowers.

Edited by Eldorado
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On Saturday, November 05, 2016 at 5:31 PM, oldrover said:

Well, whatever it is it's obviously not an air breather.

Dog fish in the lake? I think they mean catfish. You won't get salt water species in a lake at an elevation of over a KM and about 300 KM inland. Nor relict populations of marine mammals.

Plus, it's a big lake, but not huge.

Siberia land of tall tales. 

Not so sure about tales, there was a population of pgymy mammoths on remote island near the artic. So maybe theres a frozen whale up thier,;who knows

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7 minutes ago, Mr.United_Nations said:

Not so sure about tales, there was a population of pgymy mammoths on remote island near the artic. So maybe theres a frozen whale up thier,;who knows

Wrangel Island is the one I think you mean, and yes it's amazing to think just how recent they were. 

But if there was a whale a whale in Lake Labynkyr, which isn't likely as it's about 300KM inland at an elevation of around a KM, then, as the lake's surface entirely freezes it's not going to be able to breathe. 

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5 hours ago, oldrover said:

But if there was a whale a whale in Lake Labynkyr, which isn't likely as it's about 300KM inland at an elevation of around a KM, then, as the lake's surface entirely freezes it's not going to be able to breathe. 

By the immutable laws of 'believer' science, that's proof of the existence of the Siberian gilled whale. :P

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2 hours ago, PersonFromPorlock said:

By the immutable laws of 'believer' science, that's proof of the existence of the Siberian gilled whale. :P

I'm sure that doesn't apply here. But that is funny, all the more so because it's so bloody true. 

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