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Two new video clips show alleged thylacines

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Black Monk

A list of a animals once thought to have been extinct by "experts" but were eventually discovered to be alive and well:

Coelacanth

Gracilidris (the South American ant)

Giant Palouse earthworm

Terror skink

Nelson's small-eared shrew

Arakan forest turtle

Javan elephant

Lord Howe Island stick insect

Takahe

Cuban Solenodon

Ivory-billed woodpecker

Monito del Monte

Narwhal

Giant squid

Mountain gorilla

Okapi

Bermuda petrel

Caspian horse

Chacoan peccary

Gilbert's potoroo

La Gomera giant lizard

Madagascar serpent eagle

Worcester's buttonquail

 

 

 

 

 

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Black Monk
1 minute ago, oldrover said:

Yes, and that's from an unreferenced section in a Wikipedia article. Try an expert source like the Thylacine Museum. 

 

Plus, on your own link it says 'Most observations were made during the day', whereas you stated.that they only came out at night. 

The full sentence actually reads:

Most observations were made during the day whereas the thylacine was naturally nocturnal. 

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Carnoferox
1 minute ago, Black Monk said:

A list of a animals once thought to have been extinct by "experts" but were eventually discovered to be alive and well:

Coelacanth

Gracilidris (the South American ant)

Giant Palouse earthworm

Terror skink

Nelson's small-eared shrew

Arakan forest turtle

Javan elephant

Lord Howe Island stick insect

Takahe

Cuban Solenodon

Ivory-billed woodpecker

Monito del Monte

Narwhal

Giant squid

Mountain gorilla

Okapi

Bermuda petrel

Caspian horse

Chacoan peccary

Gilbert's potoroo

La Gomera giant lizard

Madagascar serpent eagle

Worcester's buttonquail

 

 

 

 

 

Note how most of these rediscovered animals are actually quite small. The gorilla, okapi, giant squid, and narwhal were not actually thought to be extinct, but rather it was their existence that was questioned.

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oldrover
6 minutes ago, Black Monk said:

The full sentence actually reads:

Most observations were made during the day whereas the thylacine was naturally nocturnal. 

Yes I saw that too. I sort of assumed we'd both realise that the other was aware the Wiki link mentioned the word 'nocturnal', after all that was the entire point of you having posted it in the first place. As well as being the reason I redirected you to a more reliable source where you'd learn that they were, as I said in the first place, nocturnal and crepuscular.

But it doesn't alter the fact that the tiger was observed during the day. As opposed to being strictly nocturnal which was implied by you when said they 'only come out at night'. 

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oldrover
17 minutes ago, Black Monk said:

A list of a animals once thought to have been extinct by "experts" but were eventually discovered to be alive and well:

Coelacanth

Gracilidris (the South American ant)

Giant Palouse earthworm

Terror skink

Nelson's small-eared shrew

Arakan forest turtle

Javan elephant

Lord Howe Island stick insect

Takahe

Cuban Solenodon

Ivory-billed woodpecker

Monito del Monte

Narwhal

Giant squid

Mountain gorilla

Okapi

Bermuda petrel

Caspian horse

Chacoan peccary

Gilbert's potoroo

La Gomera giant lizard

Madagascar serpent eagle

Worcester's buttonquail

 

 

 

 

 

To be honest, and I'm not being petty, that list is wildly inaccurate. I can't be bothered to go through it in detail now but there are some glaring mistakes in there. The monitor del Monte being the most familiar to me, but why it's on that list is bit of a long story and does not involve being thought extinct and then rediscovered. As for the ivory billed woodpecker, when did that turn up alive and well?

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Hammerclaw

Until unambiguous evidence is produced--a clear, undeniable photograph or video, for instance--Thylacine  sightings can be relegated to the realm of the fanciful and wistful, wishful thinking. Not only is the creature's physical self and effects absent from the landscape, but it's vocalizations, as well.

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Mr.United_Nations

What i dont understand is why do they always use crappy quality photos or clips of cryptids where they knownit will be debunked? If they used actual quality pictures, even if the creature is  real animal, then surely everyone would take them seriously.

 

They must know this

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oldrover

Basically, the Thylacine Awareness etc is a Facebook group, with something like 3,400 members, that's it. According to one member some reporter has tagged on to it hence the media coverage for what is in reality a shunned circus with not much of an audience. 

His members lap it up, everyone else laughed at it for a bit, but now we're getting bored.

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Swede
6 hours ago, Black Monk said:

A list of a animals once thought to have been extinct by "experts" but were eventually discovered to be alive and well:

Ivory-billed woodpecker

While, in recent history, a bit contentious, there is no definitive evidence of the continued existence of the Ivory-billed woodpecker in the continental United States. See Cornell studies, etc.

.

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Swede
8 hours ago, Black Monk said:

A list of a animals once thought to have been extinct by "experts" but were eventually discovered to be alive and well:

Okapi
 

The Okapi was never considered to have been "extinct". The species (a giraffid) was only formally identified in the early 20th century.

It would appear that you have derived your "list" from a rather questionable source. Two points:

  • Consider the source. In addition, consider actually engaging in the effort to verify the validity of the source.
  • As you would appear to have derived your "data" from an external source, citations would be expected. Plagiarism is not well condoned on these pages and most certainly not in the professional realm.

.

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Swede
9 hours ago, Black Monk said:

A list of a animals once thought to have been extinct by "experts" but were eventually discovered to be alive and well:

Narwhal

At what point in time was the Narwhal considered to have been extinct? Current population estimates suggest a figure of some 75,000. While the population may be somewhat depleted, the historical/biological record of the species would not appear to indicate any evidence of "extinction".

Without going into greater detail, it is readily apparent that your "list" is primarily rubbish. With the exception of the coelacanth, there are glaring flaws in your source material.

.

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oldrover

There are some examples of species that have been recently declared extinct but then rediscovered, but the bulk of it is ill informed nonsense complied by someone who clearly has no idea what it is they'e talking about.

None of which would be worth mentioning except for the parenthesization of the word 'experts'. Presumably intended to imply that these 'experts' (whoever they were) should have known better.

Whereas an understanding of the list shows they knew a hell of a lot more than the the people either compiling, or citing it. 

So no surprise there. 

 

Edited by oldrover

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Sundew

I think many wish the continued existence of certain animals, the Thylacine being a prime example, because they represent the worst that man has done to nature. That we not only wiped out a species, but possibly didn't even care enough to give the last one shelter, letting it die of exposure, cold and alone in a pen (although that account has been questioned, I believe). I feel such guilt, deserved or not, continues the search even to the point of suggesting cloning of the animal, which last I had heard had met with far too many hurdles, given our level of technology. 

Given the ruggedness of Tasmania, I suppose it is possible a very small remnant population might exist, but only an unambiguous photograph or a body alive of dead will prove that. And it's impossible to prove a negative, so a certain percentage of folks will continue to believe it's out there somewhere, just hiding around the next bush. 

Sadly, our record has not improved with time, and many more species face potential extinction now than ever before. 

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Myles
16 hours ago, Mr.United_Nations said:

What i dont understand is why do they always use crappy quality photos or clips of cryptids where they knownit will be debunked? If they used actual quality pictures, even if the creature is  real animal, then surely everyone would take them seriously.

 

They must know this

To be fair, my trail camera usually produces these types of photos too.   I can tell it is a raccoon or a opossum, but the quality is bad. 

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Calibeliever

If you'd told me that was shot in North Texas or California I would have instantly said it's a Coyote. They tail is right, the gate and the head look correct. The brain fills in the missing information because I know what I'm looking for. The OP of the video wanted to see a Thylacine so ....

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Thorvir
On 12/4/2016 at 9:47 AM, Black Monk said:

People thought the coelacanth was extinct for millions of years until one was caught off South Africa in the 1930s.

Correct.  However, this is not a coelacanth, it is a fox or dog being used to claim sight of a living thylacine.  Please stay focused and strop trying to derail another thread.

23 hours ago, Black Monk said:

And the thylacine inhabits a sparsely-populated area and only comes out at night.

Except that they've been extinct and there is no proof that they exist.

Quote

There have been around 4,000 sightings of the animal since the 1930s, including on mainland Australia.

No, there hasn't.  Lemme guess, they were wearing the incorrect English Civil War uniforms, too, right?

Edited by Thorvir Hrothgaard
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Thorvir
18 hours ago, Mr.United_Nations said:

What i dont understand is why do they always use crappy quality photos or clips of cryptids where they knownit will be debunked? If they used actual quality pictures, even if the creature is  real animal, then surely everyone would take them seriously.

 

They must know this

Because hoaxers and liars aren't the smartest bunch around.

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oldrover
2 hours ago, Thorvir Hrothgaard said:

Because hoaxers and liars aren't the smartest bunch around.

Oh god no, especially not this one.

The Thylacine Awareness Group of Australia (TAGA) seems to be basically one man Neil Waters. There's another regular there who may or may not be involved, I think they are in fact I believe it's his misses, but I could be wrong. They both use the same Avatar across various sites. Either way both of them have been doing the rounds for a few years now. Never saying anything particularly remarkable, and never very prolific. 

The group has around 3,400 members, one of which is apparently a tabloid journalists, hence the media coverage of such a tiny fringe FB group. 

What TAGA are claiming now has gone off the stupid chart, but they can get away with it due to the fact the most people don't even have a clue what a marsupial is, and hardly anyone knows anything about the thylacine. 

As always with cryptozoology, there's more than just tall tales, it seems that the idea of Waters v's 'the stupid lazy scientists' who are just out to play along with 'the government' and their 'conspiracies' strikes a chord with the stupid. 

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paperdyer

The creature seemed to be hopping a bit like a raccoon.  Seemed too big for a raccoon, but not an injured fox or dog.

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NightScreams

 

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Quote

 

 

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Horta
On 12/5/2016 at 2:16 AM, Black Monk said:

A list of a animals once thought to have been extinct by "experts" but were eventually discovered to be alive and well:

Coelacanth

Gracilidris (the South American ant)

Giant Palouse earthworm

Terror skink

Nelson's small-eared shrew

Arakan forest turtle

Javan elephant

Lord Howe Island stick insect

Takahe

Cuban Solenodon

Ivory-billed woodpecker

Monito del Monte

Narwhal

Giant squid

Mountain gorilla

Okapi

Bermuda petrel

Caspian horse

Chacoan peccary

Gilbert's potoroo

La Gomera giant lizard

Madagascar serpent eagle

Worcester's buttonquail

 

 

 

 

 

But no Thylacine...

 

ps. Interesting that we didn't have many decades of fake coelacanth sightings, where they were constantly confused with other fish by cryptozoologists, before a specimen was obtained (by a scientist looking for exactly such things).

When were mountain gorilla's thought to be extinct? Narwhal? Okapi?...and who were these experts?

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Mr.United_Nations
20 hours ago, Myles said:

To be fair, my trail camera usually produces these types of photos too.   I can tell it is a raccoon or a opossum, but the quality is bad. 

But you dont go parading around its a a cryptid when you know its a racoon.

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Eye of Giza

This is the funniest video Ive seen. As a Tasmanian living in Western Australia to me it looks like a fox. looking at the tail it looks bushy. I dont think we have any wild racoons here in australia. Im sure the Tasmania Tiger might be out there in Tasmanias wilderness or somewhere and in Victoria but thats about it.

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coolguy

Thats a cool raccoon

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DieChecker
On 12/3/2016 at 0:52 PM, Buzz_Light_Year said:

May depend more on much delay the cameras have or were set to after they detected movement.

I have a trail cam that unfortunately I don't know how to set very good, and it often gets just the butt end of passing deer and such. Often takes a good pic of the second deer in line however. :tu:

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