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Still Waters

'Mythical' Sea Blob Finally Spotted

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Still Waters

A mysterious sea blob that looks like a psychedelic Slinky has finally been spotted, more than a century after it was first described.

The translucent, sea-dwelling invertebrate, called Bathochordaeus charon, was identified recently off the coast of Monterey, California, by scientists using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Though B. charon was first discovered a century ago, no one had managed to confirm its existence in all those years, Rob Sherlock, a scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute who found the creature, told Live Science in an email.

http://www.livescience.com/57081-sea-blob-identified-after-century.html

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ouija ouija

It looks lovely in the pic ...... as if it's floating along within its own personal galaxy!

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Parsec

Well, only a Sherlock could solve a mystery 100 years old. 

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MJNYC

They just had to capture it, because it's life just doesn't matter.

Disgraceful.

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Brok
28 minutes ago, MJNYC said:

They just had to capture it, because it's life just doesn't matter.

Disgraceful.

Well, yeah. Kinda hard to research it without capturing it first.

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Sundew
2 hours ago, MJNYC said:

They just had to capture it, because it's life just doesn't matter.

Disgraceful.

And James Audubon shot the birds he painted. Sometimes if you want to study something, especially something in an alien environment like the deep ocean you have have to take a specimen. Taking a specimen will no doubt help with classification, I imagine the records could stand updating after 100 plus years. 

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paperdyer
18 hours ago, Sundew said:

And James Audubon shot the birds he painted. Sometimes if you want to study something, especially something in an alien environment like the deep ocean you have have to take a specimen. Taking a specimen will no doubt help with classification, I imagine the records could stand updating after 100 plus years. 

I trust the habitat will be pressurized to the same pressures the fellow has naturally in the ocean. Hopefully "study" doesn't mean any samples taken from the creature.  Then all should be shot or at least kept in a cage for study.

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MJNYC
19 hours ago, Sundew said:

And James Audubon shot the birds he painted. Sometimes if you want to study something, especially something in an alien environment like the deep ocean you have have to take a specimen. Taking a specimen will no doubt help with classification, I imagine the records could stand updating after 100 plus years. 

Just because James Audubon did that, doesn't make it right.  In fact, shame on him.  That animal has a right to it's life, without humans tampering with it or ending it.  

Again, disgraceful.

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MJNYC
21 hours ago, Brok said:

Well, yeah. Kinda hard to research it without capturing it first.

Maybe they could have taken pictures and spent some time in the ocean with it, rather than ending it's freedom and life.  I'll be they could find another way if they cared.

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Sundew
10 hours ago, paperdyer said:

I trust the habitat will be pressurized to the same pressures the fellow has naturally in the ocean. Hopefully "study" doesn't mean any samples taken from the creature.  Then all should be shot or at least kept in a cage for study.

I believe pressure is the least important parameter for keeping the creature alive. If acclimated slowly, it should be able to do fine with normal sea level pressures, because it is a creature that is mostly water, which is non-compressible; the pressure inside its body would be the same as that of the surrounding water. What is probably more important is temperature. At great depths the water may be only a few degrees above freezing and likely the animals that live there cannot survive warm conditions. Also, they have to utilize a special aquarium whose water flow prevents the animal from contacting the sides of the tank. Something they use for jellyfish. Animals in the deeps sea may spend their entire lives without ever contacting a solid object, and some are so fragile that to do so would damage or kill them. Lighting would also have to be dim, there is no light at these depths other than that produced by the organisms themselves. 

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Athena1979

Yeah! Save the Sea Blob from us disgusting humans so that the Blob can live a happy, free, long....oh, wait...a shark just ate it.

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Athena1979

Yeah! Save the Sea Blob from us disgusting humans so that the Blob can live a happy, free, long....oh, wait...a shark just ate it.

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Athena1979

Yeah! Save the Sea Blob from us disgusting humans so that the Blob can live a happy, free, long....oh, wait...a shark just ate it.

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