Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
UM-Bot

Mystery surrounds Australia's Min Min Lights

32 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

highdesert50

First impression is that of the Hessdalen lights of Norway. Perhaps Australia also has a naturally occurring battery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kartikg

A decent telescope can help to solve the mystery. Someone who is near the location can arrange it by contacting local astronomy club.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AcousticAsylum

Sounds similar to the Paulding Light, we have up here in Michigan.
Cool story nonetheless, hope it remains a mystery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stereologist

I like the idea that there could be an atmospheric effect involved. I am surprised that people thought they could tell the distance to the light across a dark expanse.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MissJatti

Any proof of evidence of this so called minmin lights.

Checked google and no photos or videos, must be peoples hallucinations 

Edited by MissJatti

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Calibeliever
3 hours ago, AcousticAsylum said:

Sounds similar to the Paulding Light, we have up here in Michigan.
Cool story nonetheless, hope it remains a mystery.

Funny, the same thing came to mind. I had just stumbled across this a few weeks ago.

http://www.mtu.edu/news/stories/2010/october/just-time-for-halloween-michigan-tech-students-solve-mystery-paulding-light.html

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Parsec
4 hours ago, MissJatti said:

Any proof of evidence of this so called minmin lights.

Checked google and no photos or videos, must be peoples hallucinations 

Although I tend to lean towards the Fata Morgana explanation, in all fairness have you ever tried to take a picture or a video on a distant, dim light in a pitch black environment with your mobile? 

If you have time/chance, try with the moon, that's bright a relatively big, and see which are the results. As stereologist can explain you way better than me, they are not so good. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
back to earth
10 hours ago, MissJatti said:

Any proof of evidence of this so called minmin lights.

Checked google and no photos or videos, must be peoples hallucinations 

Naw !   They been around for a century or so ... but the explanation , only been around about 40 years .

..... thats our MBot  !   :)   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Habitat

I have been in that area, I was on a dirt road late at night and saw what I thought was the lights of a car approaching in the distance, but it never arrived, and there were no roads branching off. I am not claiming it as a Min-Min ! I spoke to an old guy who had spent most of his life in the area, who claimed to have seen it many times, from what I recall of the conversation, he said the light was quite dull, something like a kerosene lantern luminosity, and he tended to the theory it was a bird of some kind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
back to earth

....  ?    A bird with a kerosene lantern   ?  :huh:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Habitat
3 minutes ago, back to earth said:

....  ?    A bird with a kerosene lantern   ?  :huh:

This was a long time ago, mid 1970's, Boulia area, the fella I spoke to was around 70 I'd say, possibly late 60's. He did not make a big deal of the Min-Min light, very matter of fact, but I do recall him insisting the light was not bright, and resembled that of a hurricane lamp in intensity. and he said he had seen it many times. Could be some kind of bioluminescence. Anyone who has been at sea at night, is likely to have seen wonders of bioluminescence that are hard to believe are not artificial light.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stereologist

Chrlzs is the one to contact about taking photos in dim light situations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
back to earth
6 minutes ago, Habitat said:

This was a long time ago, mid 1970's, Boulia area, the fella I spoke to was around 70 I'd say, possibly late 60's. He did not make a big deal of the Min-Min light, very matter of fact, but I do recall him insisting the light was not bright, and resembled that of a hurricane lamp in intensity. and he said he had seen it many times. Could be some kind of bioluminescence. Anyone who has been at sea at night, is likely to have seen wonders of bioluminescence that are hard to believe are not artificial light.

'Ghost dolphins'  !   Abso efen loutely  a m  a z i n g  !

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
back to earth
9 minutes ago, stereologist said:

Chrlzs is the one to contact about taking photos in dim light situations.

 

 

<_<        We wondered who that was !   

 

 

 

 

Image result for making out in car

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Habitat
7 minutes ago, back to earth said:

'Ghost dolphins'  !   Abso efen loutely  a m  a z i n g  !

 

 

 

 

That of course is bioluminescent plankton "lighting  up" when disturbed by the dolphin's passage through the water, it causes me to wonder whether hydrodynamicists could use this phenomenon to better study water flow around objects like boat's hulls, etc.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Calibeliever

They tried with dolphins a while back but it proved to be tough to capture the right circumstances:

http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/pub/shedding-light-on-dolphins

The relevant bit: " By recording the ghostly, blue-green bioluminescent halo around the moving dolphins, Latz and Rohr were able to examine the flow of water over the creatures as they coasted beneath the camera. The study revealed that the hydrodynamic boundary layer is typically quite thin up front and that, contrary to expectations based on simple fluid mechanics, the flow does not separate from the body of the animal along its flank. "

Interesting stuff

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
back to earth

I would love to see this in person 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ChrLzs
On 12/7/2016 at 6:31 AM, Parsec said:

Although I tend to lean towards the Fata Morgana explanation, in all fairness have you ever tried to take a picture or a video on a distant, dim light in a pitch black environment with your mobile? 

If you have time/chance, try with the moon, that's bright a relatively big, and see which are the results. As stereologist can explain you way better than me, they are not so good. 

It's true that phones in cameras are generally not all that good in dim light - they are getting better, but you need to spend a lot to get a half decent one..  There is no substitute for a large sensor and a large lens, so that it has a chance to gather lots of photons.

Moon images are a different problem..  Even though it's quite a bit bigger than a star (or Min Min light), it's still quite small in terms of how much of the scene it occupies, and as the rest of the scene is probably very dark, the camera adjust for that, resulting in the Moon being complete overexposed - it blooms out to a white featureless blob.  The correct exposure for the Moon is more like a normal daylight exposure - some cameras allow you to override the exposure so you could do better..

If you are stuck with a camera phone and want to record a dim scene, then you should try:

1. Keep the camera as still as possible - a car roof, a fence post, power pole.. jam the camera hard against it..

2. Try to include background - while you are probably tempted to zoom in, this may not be the best thing to do...when the camera is zoomed in, it collects even less of those photons.  And see 3.

3. Don't use 'digital' zoom - check the manual and turn it off, or if it always does digital zoom (ie it does not have real optical zoom) then don't zoom at all.  Digital zoom is effectively worse than useless as it creates false detail - that might be ok on someone's face, but it's NOT ok for analysis.

4. Experiment in advance - try out the different modes and settings your camera may offer - some may work better at night than others (and it won't necessarily be the 'Night' mode that is best!  And if your camera has trouble autofocusing at night and keeps racking back and forth making the stars/streetlights big then small, over and over... well, you may as well not use that camera for this purpose unless in one of the modes (eg Landscape) it sets focus to infinity (not many do, sadly)..  Read your manual....

 

If in doubt about a particular camera's capabilities, or what to buy if you want something a bit more serious, just ask..

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
docyabut2
Quote

There are a lot of organism's that light the earth and the water.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Habitat
On 12/8/2016 at 0:00 AM, Calibeliever said:

They tried with dolphins a while back but it proved to be tough to capture the right circumstances:

http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/pub/shedding-light-on-dolphins

The relevant bit: " By recording the ghostly, blue-green bioluminescent halo around the moving dolphins, Latz and Rohr were able to examine the flow of water over the creatures as they coasted beneath the camera. The study revealed that the hydrodynamic boundary layer is typically quite thin up front and that, contrary to expectations based on simple fluid mechanics, the flow does not separate from the body of the animal along its flank. "

Interesting stuff

It has long been known that fish and marine mammals are far more efficient in lessening the retarding frictional drag, than man-made structures like boats can. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
back to earth

Really ?   

 

Image result for hydroplane ferry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Habitat
6 minutes ago, back to earth said:

Really ?   

 

 

Very much so. Man-made objects are nowhere near as 'slippery" through the water, and I am relatively well informed on this subject.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.