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Science bringing back extinct Cow

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Scientists close to bringing extinct SEVEN FOOT GIANT COW back to life
RESEARCHERS are close to bringing back a breed of giant cattle, known as aurochs, back to life after they died out nearly 400 years ago.

Using a process known as back-breeding, which involves selectively mating existing varieties of cattle, scientists believe they will soon develop a beast that shares the same characteristics as the fabled auroch.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/748381/aurochs-extinct-giant-cow-Operation-Tauros-Donato-Matassino


 

 

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great, we are going to need a bigger plate.

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Happy days. I can see the headlines now....people against eating meat protesting about this....and meat eaters (like me) going to sharpen our eating utensils. 

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I forgot my emoticon...:clap::wub:

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1 hour ago, DebDandelion said:

I forgot my emoticon...:clap::wub:

there will be plenty to go round, I`ll get the oven ready:

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1 hour ago, freetoroam said:

there will be plenty to go round, I`ll get the oven ready:

Mother of all fires. I don't want it that we'll done:D

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.

Years ago I found what I now believe could be the fossil of an auroch's tooth - by a stream in a meadow
about 3 miles from where I live -

I used to call it my dinosaur tooth :) but then looked at loads of pictures of fossilized teeth and decided  it was
probably from the extinct Auroch - one of the back ones - it's approx 3 inches wide and 6 inches long (without
the roots) and very worn down - 

.

 

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51 minutes ago, bee said:

it's approx 3 inches wide and 6 inches long (without
the roots) and very worn down - 

Are you sure it wasn't a Ginormousantopithecus ?

~

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Bringing back the aurochs? Are they sure this is a good idea? Well, if they're going to roam the steppes...

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This is exciting. 

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While this is certainly commendable, we read recently of the impending extinction of the cheetah in part to due habitat loss. So, with diminishing resources, this endeavor, which is certainly resource dependent, ultimately bodes poorly for the beast. Why not focus on preserving that which we have rather than addressing it as an biological afterthought.

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In other news
 

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Pandas are taken off the endangered list and wild tigers are on the rise in a landmark year for the world's wildlife

    Environmental groups say there have been 'landmark successes' across the globe during 2016
    The numbers of tigers in the wild said to have increased for the first time since conservation efforts began
    Meanwhile Nepal has marked two years in a row with no poaching of its rhinos for their horns
    Giant pandas threatened status has been downgraded from 'endangered' to 'vulnerable' in another boost


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4075488/Pandas-taken-endangered-list-wild-tigers-rise-landmark-year-world-s-wildlife.html#ixzz4UKLxrnLg


 

 

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Habitat loss ... now that's going to start some sort of a war on a lot of fronts ...

~

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This means that the cow pats in the fields will be bath size , watch out when you're doggy walking.

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maxresdefault.jpg

MOOOOOOOOHH

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This animal has a little bit of a dark history when it comes to trying to recreate it. See Heck's Cattle. Nasty business.

Recently it was published that the European Bison contains Auroch DNA. 

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Next .. let bring back extinct human

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I have only one thing to say about this.

 

Moo.

 

 

Sorry, for a seven foot cow:

 

MOO!

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Well that's confusing.  The UM article that links to these comments ( http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/302212/scientists-set-to-revive-extinct-steppe-bison ) is about the Steppe Bison, which is not the same thing as an Auroch, whose express.co.uk article is linked at the top of this comment page.  If I were a scientist, I would claim to be "baffled."

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4 minutes ago, MisterMan said:

Well that's confusing.  The UM article that links to these comments ( http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/302212/scientists-set-to-revive-extinct-steppe-bison ) is about the Steppe Bison, which is not the same thing as an Auroch, whose express.co.uk article is linked at the top of this comment page.  If I were a scientist, I would claim to be "baffled."

 

 

have a read

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The European bison (Bison bonasus), also known as wisent (/ˈviːzənt/ or /ˈwiːzənt/) or the European wood bison, is a Eurasian species of bison. It is one of two extant species of bison, alongside the American bison. Three subspecies existed in the recent past, but only one survives today. The species is descended from a hybrid, a cross between a female Aurochs, the extinct wild ancestor of modern cattle, and a male Steppe bison; the original hybrid is known informally as the Higgs bison.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_bison


 

 

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But it was two completely different articles.  One about Aurochs and one about Steppe Bison.

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30 minutes ago, MisterMan said:

But it was two completely different articles.  One about Aurochs and one about Steppe Bison.

 

well I cant speak for what the site posts after I post, try this tho


 

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But now, thanks to ancient DNA from the creatures' bones, researchers know that the mysterious bison was a hybrid animal that originated more than 120,000 years ago, when the extinct aurochs (the ancestor of modern cattle) and the ice-age steppe bison got together, the researchers said.

 The Aurochs (Bos primigenius) and bison (Bison priscus) are "genetically quite different," Cooper told Live Science. "[But they] produced something that was successful enough to carve out a niche on the landscape and go on to become, ironically, the biggest species [of other large animals] to survive the extinction at the end of the ice age in Europe."

In addition, the discovery of the hybrid shows that the steppe bison, which was once thought to be the only bison in that region during the last ice age, likely competed with the hybrid species for tens of thousands of years, Cooper said.

 Then, the scientists studied ancient DNA from 64 different bison, including the creature's mitochondrial DNA (genetic material passed down through the mother's lineage) and nuclear DNA, or DNA passed down from both parents.

"We could see that the nuclear DNA was very obviously like the steppe bison," Cooper said. "The mitochondrial [was] telling us another [ancestor]: cattle."

The evidence suggested that the creature was a hybrid, likely started by a female Aurochs and a male steppe bison, he said. Moreover, the hybrid animal's nuclear DNA was about 90 percent steppe bison and 10 percent Aurochs, Cooper said.
http://www.livescience.com/56533-european-bison-hybrid-discovered.html


 

 

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