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Sea levels could rise by 30ft, study warns


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Good gravy!  That would eliminate a huge amount of the current shore lines.  I wonder how much land would be lost.  When Florida is already sinking, how much would be out of water?

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easy to sort out...if true which I doubt....

all we need to do is dig big holes in the seabed.... loads of them, that'll lower any rises  :lol:

Or just chuck lots of sponges in the sea...

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13 minutes ago, seeder said:

easy to sort out...if true which I doubt....

all we need to do is dig big holes in the seabed.... loads of them, that'll lower any rises  :lol:

Or just chuck lots of sponges in the sea...

Lol you are a nut

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23 minutes ago, seeder said:

easy to sort out...if true which I doubt....

all we need to do is dig big holes in the seabed.... loads of them, that'll lower any rises  :lol:

Or just chuck lots of sponges in the sea...

It would be interesting to see what could happen if we dredged the sea floor on a massive scale.  

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1 minute ago, Myles said:

It would be interesting to see what could happen if we dredged the sea floor on a massive scale.  

 

well the parts of the floor that are sand and mud....are already waterlogged, so digging holes wouldn't make a difference...

If I understood your question that is?

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7 minutes ago, Myles said:

It would be interesting to see what could happen if we dredged the sea floor on a massive scale.  

We'd collect a lot of our garbage back.

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I would think that with rising sea levels there would be more rain. Leading to flooding in certain areas.

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22 minutes ago, seeder said:

 

well the parts of the floor that are sand and mud....are already waterlogged, so digging holes wouldn't make a difference...

If I understood your question that is?

I wasn't really thinking about it affecting sea levels.   More about giant hills of sea floor on land.   How long would it take for land plants to grow in it?    How stable would it be?  

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It would be incredibly rich in nutrients for plants.  Think of all the broken down fish waste along with decomposed marine life.

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Plant acacia trees (as clay seed pellets) over as much of the worlds deserts (including all of Australia) as possible, the increased humidity and rainfall would turn the desert belt into an enormous tropical paradise. give it a few decades of heavy rain to fill the giant desert aquifers which would likely have a dramatic effect on sea level, plus all the water in the saturated ground/animals/plants/lakes/rivers etc...we'd have a highly oxygenated, well watered, well fed and biodiverse planet in a couple of generations. Not to mention more land to play with thanks to the lowered sea levels.

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3 minutes ago, Lone Timelord said:

Plant acacia trees (as clay seed pellets) over as much of the worlds deserts (including all of Australia) as possible, the increased humidity and rainfall would turn the desert belt into an enormous tropical paradise. give it a few decades of heavy rain to fill the giant desert aquifers which would likely have a dramatic effect on sea level, plus all the water in the saturated ground/animals/plants/lakes/rivers etc...we'd have a highly oxygenated, well watered, well fed and biodiverse planet in a couple of generations. Not to mention more land to play with thanks to the lowered sea levels.

And build desalination plants along coastlines, pump water by pipelines to desert regions, and return the filtered minerals back into the oceans to maintain the balance in freshwater ice melt. If Israel can do it, it can be done here in the U.S. 

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Simplybill, Desalination is extremely costly and wasteful not to mention environmentally damaging when the hyper saline wastewater is dumped back into the ocean, long term solution would be to reforest as much of the high ground with desert trees as possible. the cool shaded ground soaks up the extra rainfall and humidity brought by the trees, allowing the water table to rise, once the rising water table hits natural faults it forces water to the surface in the form of springs/stream and rivers. Real world terraforming using a well understood natural system (the water cycle).

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12 minutes ago, Lone Timelord said:

Simplybill, Desalination is extremely costly and wasteful not to mention environmentally damaging when the hyper saline wastewater is dumped back into the ocean, long term solution would be to reforest as much of the high ground with desert trees as possible. the cool shaded ground soaks up the extra rainfall and humidity brought by the trees, allowing the water table to rise, once the rising water table hits natural faults it forces water to the surface in the form of springs/stream and rivers. Real world terraforming using a well understood natural system (the water cycle).

Lone Timelord:

Thank you, I'll read up on it some more. Israel has made progress on desalination, though I don't know how they process the waste (or byproduct?). 

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I get beach front property. Maybe.

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"We are rapidly approaching ocean conditions that haven't been really seen on this planet for over 120,000 years," said paleoclimatologist Jeremy Hoffman from the Science Museum of Virginia.

"That's a very relevant thing as we head into the next couple decades, and we start making policy decisions to turn this train around."

Yet every single species alive today survived that time, and not enough time has gone by to actually have allowed much evolution. So animals today probably would do just as well as they did then. The real problem will be that the change probably will not be nearly over as long a time period, so animals that live in micro environments will not have those environments move fast enough to avoid trouble. 

I still think it would not be too hard to turn things around. It is only politics and economics that prevent us fixing it right now. I kind of like the artificial CO2 collection trees idea myself.

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On 1/20/2017 at 4:59 PM, XenoFish said:

I get beach front property. Maybe.

Isn't that 20 to 30 meters though? 20 to 30 feet wouldn't be quite as bad. Though Florida would still almost be gone. 

Edited by DieChecker
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On 20.01.2017 at 6:16 PM, XenoFish said:

I would think that with rising sea levels there would be more rain. Leading to flooding in certain areas.

Yes, it could be, and we would have the second Flood

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Just now, Abigail Evans said:

Yes, it could be, and we would have the second Flood

No we wouldn't. We'd have localized flooding. Not some water world.

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13 minutes ago, XenoFish said:

No we wouldn't. We'd have localized flooding. Not some water world.

Ok, I would have localized Flood.

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18 hours ago, brlesq1 said:

There goes Miami. And New Orleans...

The Crescent city is so low that a fish fart causes it to flood ;)  My community is, on average, 40 feet above sea level.  The beach would just come closer to us.  Unfortunately, the hot, muggy summer weather would probably become constant and insufferable.

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It bound to happen with the Antarctica  melting just like, 12,000  bc when the sea levels rose 200 ft gradually.

 

Edited by docyabut2
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