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Mystery surrounds felling of 200 beech trees

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FlyingAngel

200 years of work destroyed within minutes. Well done /sarcarsm

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Herr Falukorv

He is getting behind..

We have a guy here in Gothenburg Sweden where I live that have been doing this for years.
He is called "Grandödaren" the spruce killer..

He has been doing this since 2005 and killed aproximately 6000 trees in a park area called Delsjön
 

Edited by Herr Falukorv
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Lucas Cooper Merrin

After a particularly wet winter, local man named Noah is being questioned

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khol

What is motivating these people to such acts of vandalism?..any form is unacceptable but cutting down trees that are hundreds of years old is trajic! Anyone hear of the "Golden Spruce"

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiidk'yaas

I worked up in the Queen Charlette Islands ( now called Haida Gwaii ) for years. Hiked into this tree which was impressive in the sunlight. A distinct golden hue that stood out from the other spruce. Blatantly cutt down by a distressed forestry worker in 1997

I suppose its a way of getting attention for various reasons.. to what end I have no idea. There are other forms of protest that can have just as much impact. I assume these individuals are also somewhat mentally comprimised

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Grandpa Greenman

It is sad when people do this.  Old growth trees are a national treasure in any country. 

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Bavarian Raven
1 hour ago, khol said:

What is motivating these people to such acts of vandalism?..any form is unacceptable but cutting down trees that are hundreds of years old is trajic! Anyone hear of the "Golden Spruce"

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiidk'yaas

I worked up in the Queen Charlette Islands ( now called Haida Gwaii ) for years. Hiked into this tree which was impressive in the sunlight. A distinct golden hue that stood out from the other spruce. Blatantly cutt down by a distressed forestry worker in 1997

I suppose its a way of getting attention for various reasons.. to what end I have no idea. There are other forms of protest that can have just as much impact. I assume these individuals are also somewhat mentally comprimised

Well no one cares(d) about the thousands of old growth regular sitka spruce being cut down annually, but as soon as someone cuts down the "special golden one" all hell breaks loose. I understand his motives perfectly - not saying i agree with it, but that i understand the sad irony he showed the world.

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Calibeliever

Why on earth? Are you saying it's a protest of some sort?

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Lucas Cooper Merrin

To be quite honest if they are beach they will come away again, it looks like there has been plenty stem left, in 20 years you wont be able to tell

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IamthemanfromNantucket

Damn Shame. People are Idiots.

Edited by IamthemanfromNantucket
Cause I feel like it
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Merc14
11 hours ago, Bavarian Raven said:

Well no one cares(d) about the thousands of old growth regular sitka spruce being cut down annually, but as soon as someone cuts down the "special golden one" all hell breaks loose. I understand his motives perfectly - not saying i agree with it, but that i understand the sad irony he showed the world.

What are you talking about?

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Hammerclaw

That's not just kids having fun, that's  grueling hard labor. There's bound to have been a motive to it, a payoff, a reward. Searching for something valuable, hidden in the trunk of a tree, but not knowing which?

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khol
13 hours ago, Bavarian Raven said:

Well no one cares(d) about the thousands of old growth regular sitka spruce being cut down annually, but as soon as someone cuts down the "special golden one" all hell breaks loose. I understand his motives perfectly - not saying i agree with it, but that i understand the sad irony he showed the world.

I feel the goverment is ultimately to blame in allowing these forest companies the cutts to begin with. He could have been more progressive in garnering large groups of people and forming demonstrations, pull a Terry Fox and run across Canada with a message about BC forest companies, gather petitions and write to parliment again and again..no he chose to sneak off and drop this tree. It was found so senseless by everyone it actually foreshadowed the point he was trying to make in the first place. It did'nt get him far either

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grant_Hadwin

The Clayoquot protests acheived success in mass groups and blockades.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clayoquot_protests

I understand his motive as well it was just ill concieved with the end result being a dead rare tree. He got alot of negative attention and feared for his life..disappeared..hmm not a good plan that one

 

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back to earth

There was an historical frenzy of tree cutting in my area .  First European settlement was based , primarily on red ceder, after it was spotted on first  forays up the river here. They cleared it up the valley and discovered it then went up to a large plateau covered in  the trees. At first it was skated into the river and branded and picked up at the river mouth. The cutting frenzy continued on the plateau but no efficient way of removing it. That didnt stop them though, they cut it ans left it on the ground where masses of it rotted eventually.

Towards the end, a forestry official got a small grove preserved. 

Image result for ancient red cedar trees at dorrigo NSW

Its starting to come back all over the place now, but it is a different tree, not the tall straight giants that stove to break through the ancient rainforest canopy .  Still, in some places, there are groves of Antarctic beech and special remnant spots of 'Gondwanaland' . 

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Chaldon
16 hours ago, back to earth said:

There was an historical frenzy of tree cutting in my area .  First European settlement was based , primarily on red ceder, after it was spotted on first  forays up the river here. They cleared it up the valley and discovered it then went up to a large plateau covered in  the trees. At first it was skated into the river and branded and picked up at the river mouth. The cutting frenzy continued on the plateau but no efficient way of removing it. That didnt stop them though, they cut it ans left it on the ground where masses of it rotted eventually.

Towards the end, a forestry official got a small grove preserved. 

Its starting to come back all over the place now, but it is a different tree, not the tall straight giants that stove to break through the ancient rainforest canopy .  Still, in some places, there are groves of Antarctic beech and special remnant spots of 'Gondwanaland' . 

That's one really sad story, man! Even here in Siberia, my village is surrounded by fields with birch groves, but once you walk in those you see the ground densely studded with stumps, and it's quite a dreary look. I understand of course, we all really need firewood here in our harsh winters, but why cut them so close to the inhabited places, those groves are a very nice place to walk. Wonderfully enough, I've never seen anyone walking there, nor anywhere else in the surrounding woods and fields, seems like I am the only one who does. I guess the most of village people prefers social entertainment to walking in nature. No wonder they don't respect nature. I guess in more distant villages, where hunters live, it may be different. Or may be not, I don't know for sure. I heard that only the indigenous peoples treat nature with respect, driven by the fear of spirits, but even them have now changed. Especially the wild twists of the Soviet era have deeply impacted their beliefs, but I can't imagine it's all completely gone, as I have experienced myself what it does mean to be deep in the wild, especially when you're alone and unarmed. One inevitably begins to believe in spirits in quite a short time. :)

Edited by Chaldon
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oldrover
18 hours ago, Hammerclaw said:

That's not just kids having fun, that's  grueling hard labor. There's bound to have been a motive to it, a payoff, a reward. Searching for something valuable, hidden in the trunk of a tree, but not knowing which?

Yes, what this almost certainly comes down to is the felling of the trees for some commercial purpose related to land use or development. Even roughly what though is hard to say as there's no location given even in the more local sources (Blackwood is about 40 miles from me). But, this sort of thing follows a well worn pattern around here, as in 'Oooh it burnt down/fell down/was vandalised, can we re-devolvep/pull down what's left of it now?

Edited by oldrover
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Eldorado
On 23/01/2017 at 1:00 PM, Lucas Cooper Merrin said:

After a particularly wet winter, local man named Noah is being questioned

Turns out Noah was with his daughters all week so now Police are just searching for "a big feller with a chainsaw".

Edited by Eldorado
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Hammerclaw
2 hours ago, oldrover said:

Yes, what this almost certainly comes down to is the felling of the trees for some commercial purpose related to land use or development. Even roughly what though is hard to say as there's no location given even in the more local sources (Blackwood is about 40 miles from me). But, this sort of thing follows a well worn pattern around here, as in 'Oooh it burnt down/fell down/was vandalised, can we re-devolvep/pull down what's left of it now?

Yeah, the fact they managed to fell that many without dropping one on their heads indicates they were professional lumberjacks.

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oldrover
14 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

Yeah, the fact they managed to fell that many without dropping one on their heads indicates they were professional lumberjacks.

Exactly, the crux of the story here seems to be the lack of anyone having applied for a licence  to do it, rather than how or why it was done. 

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Noxasa

200 year old trees are not considered "ancient" as stated in the article.  An obvious attempt to assign some great sigificance to them.  They're just average trees.  As long as the owner of the property wanted them down then I don't see a problem.

Edited by Noxasa

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Hammerclaw
On ‎1‎/‎24‎/‎2017 at 0:02 AM, back to earth said:

There was an historical frenzy of tree cutting in my area .  First European settlement was based , primarily on red ceder, after it was spotted on first  forays up the river here. They cleared it up the valley and discovered it then went up to a large plateau covered in  the trees. At first it was skated into the river and branded and picked up at the river mouth. The cutting frenzy continued on the plateau but no efficient way of removing it. That didnt stop them though, they cut it ans left it on the ground where masses of it rotted eventually.

Towards the end, a forestry official got a small grove preserved. 

Image result for ancient red cedar trees at dorrigo NSW

Its starting to come back all over the place now, but it is a different tree, not the tall straight giants that stove to break through the ancient rainforest canopy .  Still, in some places, there are groves of Antarctic beech and special remnant spots of 'Gondwanaland' . 

Same here. When settlers came to North America, the old growth forests were open and park-like. This is because Native Americans groomed the land with fire which kept deadwood and other flammable detritus from building up and encouraged the growth of grasses and shrubs to attract the animal they hunted. Now, much of the old growth has been replaced by secondary growth forests and are  tangled woods  for the most part, untouched and unmanaged. This results in catastrophic forest fires, from time to time.

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Merc14
2 hours ago, Hammerclaw said:

Same here. When settlers came to North America, the old growth forests were open and park-like. This is because Native Americans groomed the land with fire which kept deadwood and other flammable detritus from building up and encouraged the growth of grasses and shrubs to attract the animal they hunted. Now, much of the old growth has been replaced by secondary growth forests and are  tangled woods  for the most part, untouched and unmanaged. This results in catastrophic forest fires, from time to time.

To be fair they also burned down large swaths of "pristine forest" in order to increase savannah like land for grazing.   

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toast
9 hours ago, Noxasa said:

As long as the owner of the property wanted them down then I don't see a problem.

In my country trees on a privat property cannot be felled without a permit granted by the responsible authority and the accepted reasons for such a permit are limited.

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Chaldon
7 minutes ago, toast said:

In my country trees on a privat property cannot be felled without a permit granted by the responsible authority and the accepted reasons for such a permit are limited.

Just like anywhere in Europe. And in the most parts of the world, I guess. Even here in Russia you must get a "cutdown ticket" (порубочный билет) to cut down anything, otherwise it's illegal, and if a forester catches you you'll be prosecuted for sure. Yet, in the most cases, people acquire the aforementioned ticket to cut 1-3 m2 (full bed of a mid-size truck) of the timber, and use it again and again until it's expired. :)

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