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Waspie_Dwarf

Jupiter from Juno

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psyche101

Hi Waspie

Thanks for yet another breathtaking thread. 

I read the core of Jupiter is 'fuzzy' from Junos data,  might I impress upon you as to what that actually refers to? 

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Waspie_Dwarf
11 minutes ago, psyche101 said:

I read the core of Jupiter is 'fuzzy' from Junos data,  might I impress upon you as to what that actually refers to? 

There has long been a debate about whether Jupiter had a rocky core or if it is hydrogen all the way through. If it is hydrogen then pressure will force the hydrogen firstly into a liquid metallic state and finally into a solid metallic state.

I haven't come across the term "fuzzy core" before but it sounds to me like it could be a description of this metallic hydrogen core... I can imagine that such a core would not be distinctly delineated as would be the case with a rocky core and might, thus be described as "fuzzy".

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Merc14

This may be one of those questions we never get an answer to.

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psyche101
1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

There has long been a debate about whether Jupiter had a rocky core or if it is hydrogen all the way through. If it is hydrogen then pressure will force the hydrogen firstly into a liquid metallic state and finally into a solid metallic state.

I haven't come across the term "fuzzy core" before but it sounds to me like it could be a description of this metallic hydrogen core... I can imagine that such a core would not be distinctly delineated as would be the case with a rocky core and might, thus be described as "fuzzy".

Thanks Waspie 

I was hoping something had got past me, I find myself quite fascinated by the question of Jupiter's core 

This is where I first heard to term fuzzy applied to a description of Jupiter's core 

https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/amp.space.com/37005-jupiter-fuzzy-core-nasa-juno.html

 

I hope it is a question we can answer definitely someday just for personal reasons 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Jovian ‘Twilight Zone’

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This image captures the swirling cloud formations around the south pole of Jupiter, looking up toward the equatorial region.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took the color-enhanced image during its eleventh close flyby of the gas giant planet on Feb. 7 at 7:11 a.m. PST (10:11 a.m. EST). At the time, the spacecraft was 74,896 miles (120,533 kilometers) from the tops of Jupiter’s clouds at 84.9 degrees south latitude.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Rose-Colored Jupiter

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This image captures a close-up view of a storm with bright cloud tops in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter.                                                             

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took this color-enhanced image on Feb. 7 at 5:38 a.m. PST (8:38 a.m. EST) during its 11th close flyby of the gas giant planet.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Ghost in Motion

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This time-lapse animation of two true-color images taken 12 minutes apart neatly captures storm movement in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took these images during its tenth close flyby of the gas giant planet on Dec. 16, 2017 at 10:12 a.m. PST (1:12 p.m. EST) and 10:24 a.m. PST (1:24 p.m. EST).

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Intricate Clouds of Jupiter

 

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See intricate cloud patterns in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter in this new view taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

The color-enhanced image was taken on April 1 at 2:32 a.m. PST (5:32 a.m. EST), as Juno performed its twelfth close flyby of Jupiter.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Merc14
1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Ghost in Motion

 

It is so enormous it is almost incomprehensible.  Amazing stuff, hail Juno.

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Waspie_Dwarf

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, Spotted

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This image of Jupiter’s iconic Great Red Spot and surrounding turbulent zones was captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

The color-enhanced image is a combination of three separate images taken on April 1 between 3:09 a.m. PDT (6:09 a.m. EDT) and 3:24 a.m. PDT (6:24 a.m. EDT), as Juno performed its 12th close flyby of Jupiter.

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Waspie_Dwarf

Jupiter’s Dynamic Atmosphere

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This image captures the dynamic nature of Jupiter's northern temperate belt. The view reveals a white, oval-shaped anticyclonic storm called WS-4.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took this color-enhanced image on April 1 at 2:38 a.m. PST (5:38 a.m. EST) during its 12th close flyby of the gas giant planet. At the time, the spacecraft was 4,087 miles (6,577 kilometers) from the tops of Jupiter’s clouds at 35.6 degrees north latitude.

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Waspie_Dwarf

Jupiter: A New Perspective

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This extraordinary view of Jupiter was captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on the outbound leg of its 12th close flyby of the gas giant planet.

This new perspective of Jupiter from the south makes the Great Red Spot appear as though it is in northern territory. This view is unique to Juno and demonstrates how different our view is when we step off the Earth and experience the true nature of our three-dimensional universe.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Merc14
12 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

Jupiter: A New Perspective

 

That one is truly awesome.  New desktop background!

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bmk1245
10 minutes ago, Merc14 said:

That one is truly awesome.  New desktop background!

Yeap, sheer magnificence!

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Waspie_Dwarf

Jovian Jet Stream

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See a jet stream speeding through Jupiter’s atmosphere in this new view taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. The jet stream, called Jet N2, was captured along the dynamic northern temperate belts of the gas giant planet. It is the white stream visible from top left to bottom right in the image.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Dark and Stormy Jupiter

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This image captures the intensity of the jets and vortices in Jupiter’s North North Temperate Belt.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took this color-enhanced image at 10:31 p.m. PDT on May 23, 2018 (1:31 a.m. EDT on May 24), as Juno performed its 13th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time, the spacecraft was about 4,900 miles (7,900 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the gas giant planet at a northern latitude of about 41 degrees. The view is oriented with south on Jupiter toward upper left and north toward lower right.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Piney

That's my wallpaper for the next month! :lol:

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Waspie_Dwarf

Chaotic Clouds of Jupiter

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This image captures swirling cloud belts and tumultuous vortices within Jupiter’s northern hemisphere.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took this color-enhanced image at 10:23 p.m. PDT on May 23, 2018 (1:23 a.m. EDT on May 24), as the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time, Juno was about 9,600 miles (15,500 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops, above a northern latitude of 56 degrees.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Seeing Jupiter

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This image of Jupiter's southern hemisphere was captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft on the outbound leg of a close flyby of the gas-giant planet. Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam imager.

The color-enhanced image was taken at 11:31 p.m. PDT on May 23, 2018 (2:31 a.m. EDT on May 24), as the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby of Jupiter.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

High-Altitude Jovian Clouds

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This image captures a high-altitude cloud formation surrounded by swirling patterns in the atmosphere of Jupiter's North North Temperate Belt region.

The North North Temperate Belt is one of Jupiter’s many colorful, swirling cloud bands. Scientists have wondered for decades how deep these bands extend. Gravity measurements collected by Juno during its close flybys of the planet have now provided an answer. Juno discovered that these bands of flowing atmosphere actually penetrate deep into the planet, to a depth of about 1,900 miles (3,000 kilometers).

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Waspie_Dwarf

Swirling Jovian Storm (Natural Color)

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A swirling storm somersaults through Jupiter’s South Equatorial Belt in this view taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. This feature -- not to be confused with the planet’s iconic Great Red Spot -- is escorted by several smaller, reddish vortices above and to the left.

This natural color view offers an approximation of what Jupiter would look like to human eyes from Juno’s vantage point near the time of closest approach in its orbit. Jupiter’s stunning appearance is due to its atmosphere of colorful cloud bands and spots. The vivid red and orange hues are created by chemicals of uncertain composition called "chromophores."  

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Artistic Portrait of Jupiter

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See tumultuous tempests in Jupiter’s northern hemisphere in this portrait taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

Like our home planet, Jupiter has cyclones and anticyclones, along with fast-moving jet streams that circle its globe. This image captures a jet stream, called Jet N6, located on the far right of the image. It is next to an anticyclonic white oval that is the brighter circular feature in the top right corner. The North North Little Red Spot is also visible in this view.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Jovian Tapestry

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The easternmost edge of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot and surrounding south tropical disturbance are captured in this image from NASA’s Juno spacecraft. At left, wispy tendrils from the Red Spot give the atmosphere a layered appearance as they partially obscure cloud features below. 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Time-lapse Sequence of Jupiter’s North

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Striking atmospheric features in Jupiter’s northern hemisphere are captured in this series of color-enhanced images from NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

An anticyclonic white oval, called N5-AWO, can be seen at center left of the first image (at far left) and appears slightly higher in the second and third images. A tempest known as the Little Red Spot is visible near the bottom of the second and third images. The reddish-orange band that is prominently displayed in the fourth and fifth images is the North North Temperate Belt.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Jupiter’s Swirling Cloudscape

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Intricate swirls in Jupiter’s volatile northern hemisphere are captured in this color-enhanced image from NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Bursts of bright-white “pop-up” clouds appear scattered throughout the scene, with some visibly casting shadows on the neighboring cloud layers beneath them. Juno scientists are using shadows to determine the distances between cloud layers in Jupiter’s atmosphere, which provide clues to their composition and origin.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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