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BlueHeron

The Lost Tribe of Clover Hollow

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BlueHeron

Introducing the discovery of what may be the oldest civilization in the world just found in the Appalachian Mountains. Featured in the award winning book ‘The Sibold Effect: Beyond Science, History, Ghosts, and the Appalachian Supernatural’ and published articles at Ancient-Origins.net. What’s even more exciting than the actual archaeological discovery is the shocking story behind it including documented supernatural activity and an unbelievable backstory. Links to the articles and the book can be found on the website *Snip*

temple-2.jpg

Edited by kmt_sesh
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kmt_sesh

Greetings, BlueHeron.

The link didn't seem to work anyway, but refer to Rule 1a:

  • 1a. Advertising: Do not use the forum to advertise a product, site or service.

We might considering allowing the link later on, so long as no commercial purposes are evident, but first we'd prefer you share more details to start a real discussion. That's the purpose of a forum, after all.

Thanks.

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BlueHeron

I have written three articles for ancient-origins.net concerning the discovery of "The Lost Tribe of Clover Hollow" which goes into the archaeological aspects only, as bizarre as they are. The supernatural aspects of the site are explained and documented thoroughly in my book "The Sibold Effect." The first article entitled "The Lost Tribe of Clover Hollow - The Oldest Civilization Discovered in the Appalachian Mountains?" discusses the bizarre petroglyphs found at the site and the ancient history of the Appalachian Mountains and the New River that runs through them. The New River is thought to be the second oldest river in the world, the first being the Nile. The article can be found at http://www.ancient-origins.net/opinion-guest-authors/lost-tribe-clover-hollow-oldest-civilization-world-found-appalachian-mountains-021025?page=0%2C1  

Edited by BlueHeron
Capital N on the word Nile, corrected website article

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jaylemurph
23 minutes ago, BlueHeron said:

I have written three articles for ancient-origins.net concerning the discovery of "The Lost Tribe of Clover Hollow" which goes into the archaeological aspects only, as bizarre as they are. The supernatural aspects of the site are explained and documented thoroughly in my book "The Sibold Effect." The first article entitled "The Lost Tribe of Clover Hollow - The Oldest Civilization Discovered in the Appalachian Mountains?" discusses the bizarre petroglyphs found at the site and the ancient history of the Appalachian Mountains and the New River that runs through them. The New River is thought to be the second oldest river in the world, the first being the Nile. The article can be found at http://www.ancient-origins.net/opinion-guest-authors/lost-tribe-clover-hollow-oldest-civilization-world-found-appalachian-mountains-021025?page=0%2C1  

No.

The oldest river in the world is the Australian Finke River, then the European Meuse River, then the NC New River. The Nile isn't even in the top ten oldest rivers in the world.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_rivers_by_age

If you can't even get basic, verifiable info (it took me approximately 15 seconds to find the relevant data) correct, why on Earth should we trust you with unverified speculation?

--Jaylemurph

 

 

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kmt_sesh

The Nile River, as I recall, is around five million years old. It's still just a kid.

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back to earth

Image result for That's a strike !

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Hanslune
2 hours ago, BlueHeron said:

Introducing the discovery of what may be the oldest civilization in the world just found in the Appalachian Mountains. Featured in the award winning book ‘The Sibold Effect: Beyond Science, History, Ghosts, and the Appalachian Supernatural’ and published articles at Ancient-Origins.net. What’s even more exciting than the actual archaeological discovery is the shocking story behind it including documented supernatural activity and an unbelievable backstory. Links to the articles and the book can be found on the website *Snip*

Howdy BlueHeron

So I read the articles - what evidence do you have beyond rocks? I'd be skeptical of a 'civilization' that existence is based on one site where the 'artifacts' are hard if not impossible  to ID from plain rocks.

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back to earth

Strrrrrrrrrrrrr ........

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BlueHeron

You are right, I misspoke, the Finke River is considered the oldest at up to 400 millions years old, but my research shows that the New could be easily 360 millions old based on the ancient Teays River system, and that would make the New River the second oldest river in the world. The point being that this archaeological site sits on an ancient river system, in an ancient pass through the mountains, in some of the oldest mountains in the world. But, it's only my point of view, I welcome the discussion!

ltoch.jpg

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Harte

What do the ages of the mountains and rivers have to do with the timeline of occupation?

If there is anything to this (and there appears not to be,) then you are talking about a culture, not a civilization.

To paraphrase kmt_sesh, If you can't even get basic vocabulary correct, why on Earth should we trust you with unverified speculation?

Harte

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Herr Falukorv

To me this just look like you are here advertising your book.

 

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youneverlovedme

and it cant be lost if you are talking about it.

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BlueHeron

One definition of a civilization is the society, culture, and way of life of a particular area. The word culture is a synonym for the word civilization. So i'm not sure who's got their terms wrong. When examining this site that's the number one question I had. What were the cultural influences that would lead me to believe that an ancient civilization existed here? My book goes into great detail on this so yes I'm trying to advertise my book which documents the incredible backstory and is based on historical, scientific, geological, and archaeological research, coupled with Cherokee folklore and a huge dose of speculation. Just some of the cultural influences I have detected at the site:

1. Iconoclastic phenomena at the site -one civilization building on top of another.

2. Before Europeans came to the area, this was the scared hunting grounds of the Cherokee, along with other tribes.

3. This is a very strategic piece of land going back thousands of years.

4. Stone alignments suggesting possible archaeoastronomy was practiced here.

5. Hundreds of portable carved artifacts found buried around the megalithic structures, suggesting religious aspects (the ultimate definition of a culture).

6. Specific artistic method applied to the rocks, suggesting an intelligent society once lived here.

7. Detailed in the book and the subject of future articles is evidence of a written pictograph language. (strong evidence of an ancient culture)

8. Documented on film, supernatural activity at the site. Supernatural activity by definition is evidence of an afterlife. If there is an afterlife there must of once been a life. (the haters are going to love this).

The book puts all this together in a specific timeline of occupation backed by the scientific evidence collected. How did I come to be at this place you might ask? Fifteen years ago I bought this piece of land and house sight unseen while I was in Papua New Guinea for my girlfriend to live in while she went to Vet School at Virginia Tech. After closing on this randomly purchased piece of property, I found out it was connected directly to three of my first generation grandfathers from 1738. They were the first European colonist to the area and picked out this site as a mill site. All coincidental you might ask, I think not.

 

art-12.jpg

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Hanslune
2 hours ago, BlueHeron said:

One definition of a civilization is the society, culture, and way of life of a particular area. The word culture is a synonym for the word civilization.

4. Stone alignments suggesting possible archaeoastronomy was practiced here.

5. Hundreds of portable carved artifacts found buried around the megalithic structures, suggesting religious aspects (the ultimate definition of a culture).

6. Specific artistic method applied to the rocks, suggesting an intelligent society once lived here.

All coincidental you might ask, I think not.

Any stone can be selected and 'aligned' with the thousands of dots that move through the sky.

...are the portable carved artifacts...rocks? Could we see an image of a few of these?

...how are you differentiating between an 'artistic' method and weathering - could you show us a rock of the same age & origin from this site that has this 'method' applied and one that is not?

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cormac mac airt
9 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

The Nile River, as I recall, is around five million years old. It's still just a kid.

If one means the Nile as a whole then it's much less than that as between circa 1.8 Mya - 800 Kya it didn't exist as a river.

circa 1.8 My BP – 800,000 BP:

4th/Desert Phase of the Nile River in which it is non-existant during this time

(http://damanhour.edu.eg/pdf/researches/1-s2.0-S1464343X11001567-main.pdf)

(https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2008SC/finalprogram/abstract_136189.htm)

cormac

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BlueHeron

Thanks Hanslune, those are some great insights and my thoughts exactly when I wrote the following articles:

Stone Panels of Clover Hollow --Wondrous Freaks of Nature or Cryptic Messages from the Ancient Past? http://www.ancient-origins.net/opinion-guest-authors/stone-panels-clover-hollow-wondrous-freaks-nature-or-cryptic-messages-ancient-021044

The Lost Artifacts of Clover Hollow - Definite Proof of an Ancient Civilization or Just a Pile of Rocks? http://www.ancient-origins.net/opinion-guest-authors/lost-artifacts-clover-hollow-definite-proof-ancient-civilization-or-just-pile-021071

There's lots of examples and images in these two articles. I think you can make a reasonable leap of faith either way. 1. That all the rocks are completely natural and everything on Clover Hollow Mountain is 100 percent random and coincidental or 2. Everything on Clover Hollow Mountain has happened for a reason, are connected, and there are no coincedences.  This is the plausible argument I make in my book that connects my ancestors, the Lost Tribe of Clover Hollow, the Cherokee, the rock petroglyphs, and the supernatural activity together to form a hypothesis on why I believe I was brought to this property, who brought me there, and what I was supposed to find when I got there. But now you really get into the unchartered territory of destiny, purpose, and the spirit/nature relationship. Pretty heady subject matter for most. I don't claim to have all the answers, if I did I would be looking for the forum "Explained Mysteries" instead of this one. 

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Oniomancer

Good to see that you're aware of pareidolia and acknowledging it as a possibility because I'm eeing a lot of differential weathering along fracture planes. Compare:

swift06.jpg

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BlueHeron

Left brain, right brain I always say. Where was this photograph taken?

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Oniomancer
23 minutes ago, BlueHeron said:

Left brain, right brain I always say. Where was this photograph taken?

Source says Swift Dam, in Montana.

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stereologist

Hi BlueHeron. I know the area you are referring to. It is near Newport, VA. There is a big cave in the area called Clover Hollow Cave. The area is a limestone area with much of the rock in the area looking like what you call petroglyphs. Fort hose interested in the area here is a google link. This is not near Newport News, VA.

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.3073992,-80.4912908,15z?hl=en

Edited by stereologist
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BlueHeron
15 minutes ago, Oniomancer said:

Source says Swift Dam, in Montana.

Do you know if this was an isolated location or was it like this all over the place in that area? My theory on the petroglyphs in Clover Hollow are that they are manmade enhancements to already weathered rock formations. That was the method to the artists madness. If you go that way.

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BlueHeron
6 minutes ago, stereologist said:

Hi BlueHeron. I know the area you are referring to. It is near Newport, VA. There is a big cave in the area called Clover Hollow Cave. The area is a limestone area with much of the rock in the area looking like what you call petroglyphs. Fort hose interested in the area here is a google link. This is not near Newport News, VA.

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.3073992,-80.4912908,15z?hl=en

You are correct, the name of the cave is Tawny's Cave however and there is another one called Spruce Run Cave nearby. And it is mostly Limestone bedrock with evidence of an ancient coral reef right along Clover Hollow Rd.

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PersonFromPorlock
Quote

Supernatural activity by definition is evidence of an afterlife.

Not hardly. It might, for instance, be evidence of psychokinesis by a believer in supernatural activity. Or, more likely, wishful thinking by the observer.

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stereologist
4 minutes ago, BlueHeron said:

You are correct, the name of the cave is Tawny's Cave however and there is another one called Spruce Run Cave nearby. And it is mostly Limestone bedrock with evidence of an ancient coral reef right along Clover Hollow Rd.

Tawney's Cave is another in the area. It is much smaller than Clover Hollow Cave. Most people are familiar with Tawney's Cave since it is not restricted access.  The much larger Clover Hollow Cave begins with a 130 foot rappel.

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Hanslune
2 hours ago, BlueHeron said:

 

 

There's lots of examples and images in these two articles. I think you can make a reasonable leap of faith either way. 1. That all the rocks are completely natural and everything on Clover Hollow Mountain is 100 percent random and coincidental or 2. Everything on Clover Hollow Mountain has happened for a reason, are connected, and there are no coincedences.  This is the plausible argument I make in my book that connects my ancestors, the Lost Tribe of Clover Hollow, the Cherokee, the rock petroglyphs, and the supernatural activity together to form a hypothesis

Yes but your belief is based on you seeing shapes in rocks. That can be done anywhere and famously you can do so by looking at clouds. Do you have any evidence that doesn't involve you seeing things in common rocks?

Stone tools? Habitation or burial site?

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