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kmt_sesh

Let's talk history

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Piney

The Eastern Iranians brought the horse, the dragon motif in religion and art and metalwork to Asia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scythians

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians

Some combined with a Turkic people to create a new hybrid ethnic group.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumans

I don't think the article says anything about the Cumans using Eastern Iranian religious terms and practices, which they did.

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Hanslune

Jason Colavito comments on fringe theory about India being the source of the AE civilization

Quote

Anyway, Indian engineer Bibhu Dev Misra claims that a natural formation in Balochistan, Pakistan is actually an Egyptian Sphinx and temple located next to an ancient Hindu temple. He sees an outcropping as a Sphinx, eroded columns as pillars, and the visible layers of sedimentary deposit as carved registers for friezes. This conveniently ties Egypt to India and imposes both cultures on Pakistan, reclaiming the Indus Valley for India. Misra manages to avoid the most obvious question: If these buildings were meant as ancient Egyptian and Hindu temples, why do they lack interiors? They are sold rock, without doors or windows. Even if they were hollow, anything within would suffocate.
 
It’s not impossible that the rocky features might have been carved at one point, but there doesn’t seem to be any evidence of it. It looks like a case of “looks like, therefore is.”
 
The weirder of the two articles comes to us from RN Vooght, who doesn’t hide the fact that his own book, The Spirit in the Sky, is little more than a distillation of books by John Anthony West, Robert Schoch, and Graham Hancock, along with Chance Gardner’s Magical Egypt series, endorsed by Joe Rogan, a supporter of Hancock’s, and The Spirit Molecule, about Rick Strassman’s research into DMT, a psychedelic drug: “The Spirit in the Sky seeks to tie Fingerprints of the Gods, Supernatural, Serpent in the Sky and The Spirit Molecule together in a way that our ancestors hoped we one day would; in a manner that re-introduces present-day humans with the inspiring ideas and belief systems of our ancient foremothers, whose stories have been hitherto lost to time and memory.”

"Ancient Egyptian Sphinx in modern Pakistan"

sphinx_orig.png

 

http://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/graham-hancocks-website-runs-contributor-articles-alleging-egyptians-in-ancient-india-and-secret-egyptian-knowledge-of-dmt

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John Winston
On 3/14/2017 at 7:33 PM, Gaden said:

 The stones used in central America were much smaller than those in Egypt. In fact, most are small enough that a single person could carry one. If I recall correctly, one theory is that they could have used a sort of harness to carry the stones on their backs and simply had a procession of people walking from stone pile to and up the pyramid. Logistically speaking, not the nightmare the AE had. 

This thing i making some sense.The use of harness to take those stones.Yea!absolutely right.

 

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jaylemurph
17 hours ago, Hanslune said:

 

sphinx_orig.png

I think I speak for all right-thinking when I say that is clearly a giant, omnipotent Ancient Basset Hound. I mean, look at the ears!

 

--Jaylemurph 

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cormac mac airt
1 minute ago, jaylemurph said:

I think I speak for all right-thinking when I say that is clearly a giant, omnipotent Ancient Basset Hound. I mean, look at the ears!

 

--Jaylemurph 

Aww cmon Jay, that’s a floppy eared goat. :lol:

cormac

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Harte
1 hour ago, cormac mac airt said:

Aww cmon Jay, that’s a floppy eared goat. :lol:

cormac

No, this is a floppy eared goat.

Harte

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Piney
15 minutes ago, Harte said:

No, this is a floppy eared goat.

Harte

     Why the Hell did I click that........

:lol:

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cormac mac airt
12 minutes ago, Piney said:

     Why the Hell did I click that........

:lol:

 Glutton for punishment? :w00t:

cormac

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Piney
Just now, cormac mac airt said:

 Glutton for punishment? :w00t:

cormac

Yup......

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cormac mac airt
Just now, Piney said:

Yup......

Me too. :lol:

cormac

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Herr Falukorv
43 minutes ago, Harte said:

No, this is a floppy eared goat.

Harte

Why just why? 
that certanly woke my partner and kids...  
Guess I have to sleep on the sofa tonight.. :sleepy:

reminder to my self.. turn off the sound before you click on stuff. 
especially when the children have listened to music earlier in the day on the same computer, 

 

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Piney

Some more Scythian history....

https://www.eupedia.com/genetics/andronovo_culture.shtml

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andronovo_culture

 Turkish and Hungarian Turanists like to claim the people of the Andronovo Horizon  were the ancestors of the Gokturks and/or Huns. But it's garbage.

I think the Magyars (The primary ethnic group in Hungary) borrowed more from the Eastern Iranians than the Turkic tribes (Khazars) they were connected to. The art and cultural stories are more in line with the Scythians and the bits they used for their horses were not a Turkic design but a Scythian/Sarmatian one

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kmt_sesh
3 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

I think I speak for all right-thinking when I say that is clearly a giant, omnipotent Ancient Basset Hound. I mean, look at the ears!

 

--Jaylemurph 

So, what caused them to abandon Pakistan so very long ago, and move to Egypt? Were there no hams?

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jaylemurph
10 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

So, what caused them to abandon Pakistan so very long ago, and move to Egypt? Were there no hams?

Your implication that Omnipotent Hounds can only be in one single place at one single time reveals the shortcomings of your imagination.

Somebody had to teach all those Christian saints:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilocation

--Jaylemurph

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Hanslune
4 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

I think I speak for all right-thinking when I say that is clearly a giant, omnipotent Ancient Basset Hound. I mean, look at the ears!

 

--Jaylemurph 

Yes it might be a ABH and to the left out of the image's field is a large mountain that looks like a divine cat.

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Harte
2 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

So, what caused them to abandon Pakistan so very long ago, and move to Egypt? Were there no hams?

Egypt has forever been renowned for their hams:

Zahi_Hawass_grimaces.jpg

Harte

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kmt_sesh
27 minutes ago, Harte said:

Egypt has forever been renowned for their hams:

Zahi_Hawass_grimaces.jpg

Harte

LOL The hammiest ham.

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kmt_sesh
On December 4, 2017 at 11:38 PM, Hanslune said:

There is no mummy cooler than an Egyptian mummy, but I do enjoy mummies of all stripes and...um..."flavors." I keep an assortment of them in photographs on my iPad and occasionally show them to visitors at the museum.

I've always liked the serenity and incredible preservation of the floppy bog mummy called Tollund Man:

bog_feature.jpg

But whenever someone comments that our Egyptian mummies are creepy or ugly, all I have to do is show them my picture of the Han Dynasty period mummy from China called Lady Dai:

355f8355c1ab0ff023dd9d1944d56381.jpg

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Jarocal
10 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

There is no mummy cooler than an Egyptian mummy, but I do enjoy mummies of all stripes and...um..."flavors." I keep an assortment of them in photographs on my iPad and occasionally show them to visitors at the museum.

I've always liked the serenity and incredible preservation of the floppy bog mummy called Tollund Man:

bog_feature.jpg

 

1) There are many mummies cooler than Egyptian mummies.

2) Oh yes, being hanged until dead and your body unceremoniously dumped in a peat bog for disposal (without even removing the rope) epitomizes the definition of serenity.

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Windowpane
2 hours ago, Jarocal said:

... being hanged until dead and your body unceremoniously dumped in a peat bog for disposal (without even removing the rope) epitomizes the definition of serenity.

In fact, it seems that he was placed in the bog with reverence and care, as his corpse was now viewed as divine property.

A very sad episode, though ...  But I suppose we shouldn't make the mistake of viewing, with 21st century eyes, what motivated people in the past.

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ShadowSot

Here's something.  My dad recently found here he'd hid the bucket of brickwork we'd found on the bay after a major storm when I was a kid. 

 Being a kid, hopefully you can forgive me for not knowing the proper procedure. We just scooped all the pieces up into a bucket. 

Not sure what it's from, but my guess would be ballast from a ship, being at the spot of the old Pensacola docks before they burnt down. 

sVPlIiY.jpg

 

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kmt_sesh
13 hours ago, Jarocal said:

1) There are many mummies cooler than Egyptian mummies.

Not even possible. No mummy, anywhere, can exceed the coolness of Egyptian mummies. Certainly not those freeze-dried folks from the Andes who were all swaddled like burritos. (Well, we have 50 of them in our collections at the Field Museum, and they are pretty cool. Just, of course, not as cool.)

Quote

2) Oh yes, being hanged until dead and your body unceremoniously dumped in a peat bog for disposal (without even removing the rope) epitomizes the definition of serenity.

The face, man. Look at the face. That is sheer contentment. But wasn't his throat slit, too? Or was that a different bog mummy? I've always wanted to see one in person. I've seen them only in pictures.

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kmt_sesh
2 hours ago, ShadowSot said:

Here's something.  My dad recently found here he'd hid the bucket of brickwork we'd found on the bay after a major storm when I was a kid. 

 Being a kid, hopefully you can forgive me for not knowing the proper procedure. We just scooped all the pieces up into a bucket. 

Not sure what it's from, but my guess would be ballast from a ship, being at the spot of the old Pensacola docks before they burnt down. 

sVPlIiY.jpg

 

That's really interesting. Given the location where you found these pieces, I'd say ballast is a very likely conclusion. LOL If they ever do an archaeological dig of the docks, they'll wonder where all the expected ballast went. Is this broken crockery, architectural fragments? Ceramic, stone?

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Piney
Just now, kmt_sesh said:

That's really interesting. Given the location where you found these pieces, I'd say ballast is a very likely conclusion. LOL If they ever do an archaeological dig of the docks, they'll wonder where all the expected ballast went. Is this broken crockery, architectural fragments? Ceramic, stone?

Back then they used heavy stones like flint for ballast. Crockery was cheap like cardboard today so once the container were emptied they were tossed overboard or dumped.

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kmt_sesh
9 minutes ago, Piney said:

Back then they used heavy stones like flint for ballast. Crockery was cheap like cardboard today so once the container were emptied they were tossed overboard or dumped.

So perhaps when the boats came to dock, the crews were just getting rid of empties. Kind of like tossing out the garbage.

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