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kmt_sesh

Let's talk history

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Pettytalk
16 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

Humulus isn’t cannabis. Am I wrong, or is this clickbait?

—Jaylemurph 

Of course you are wrong, relatively speaking,......get it?

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/humulus

Summary and Future Directions

Cannabis and Humulus are closely related genera of Cannabaceae that share many unusual biological and phytochemical characteristics.

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Pettytalk
6 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

There’s a Jonathan Winters joke in there somewhere. 

—Jaylemurph 

Somewhere there is an impersonator waiting to come out and entertain. But it's just a mere wind-egg, I'm afraid.

 

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Mellon Man
4 hours ago, Pettytalk said:

Of course you are wrong, relatively speaking,......get it?

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/humulus

Summary and Future Directions

Cannabis and Humulus are closely related genera of Cannabaceae that share many unusual biological and phytochemical characteristics.

Suggest actually reading what you source. Yes, the two are closely related but dont share the same genus. Hence it would be extremely erroneous to state humulus is cannabis. Celtis species are also part of the Cannabaceae family, but are obviously not cannabis. 

What is next? Claiming common hackberry is actually a gaint cannabis plant? 

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ScotDeerie
1 hour ago, Mellon Man said:

What is next? Claiming common hackberry is actually a gaint cannabis plant? 

::Eagerly Googling Hackberry and regions it thrives in::: 

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Pettytalk
2 hours ago, Mellon Man said:

Suggest actually reading what you source. Yes, the two are closely related but dont share the same genus. Hence it would be extremely erroneous to state humulus is cannabis. Celtis species are also part of the Cannabaceae family, but are obviously not cannabis. 

What is next? Claiming common hackberry is actually a gaint cannabis plant? 

And I thought you could understand better! Hackberry a giant weed? I only wish it were true, and so would many others.

Relative ly speaking is related. Get it? Apparently you did not, or you are just trying to impress me as being a botanist?

You would get more glory arguing with our illuminate freemason, alchapon. I just enjoy my hops in the beer, and the rest I leave it to you really smart boys and girls.

Besides, was it not the chemical composition that was in question?

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ScotDeerie
3 hours ago, Pettytalk said:

And I thought you could understand better! Hackberry a giant weed? I only wish it were true, and so would many others.

Relative ly speaking is related. Get it? Apparently you did not, or you are just trying to impress me as being a botanist?

You would get more glory arguing with our illuminate freemason, alchapon. I just enjoy my hops in the beer, and the rest I leave it to you really smart boys and girls.

Besides, was it not the chemical composition that was in question?

Uh oh. Can someone recommend something herbal for my butt ache?

 

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Oniomancer

Hops is apparently close enough chemically to maryjane to be similarly mildly psychoactive but I believe we're dealing with a simple typo here.

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The Wistman
Posted (edited)

Some bits of news.....

(Aug. 5)  Five ancient shipwrecks discovered by Aegean explorers:

Quote

[...]  five ancient Greek shipwrecks containing amphoras have been discovered at the bottom of the eastern Aegean Sea, near the small island of Levitha. These are the first ships documented by a team from the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, which plans to explore the area's isolated islands over the next three years to identify and record wrecked vessels. One of the ships, dating to just before the mid-third century B.C., was laden with amphoras from Carthage, Phoenicia, and the Aegean islands of Knidos, Kos, and Rhodes. The other wrecks contained cargoes dating from the second century B.C. through the second century A.D. Archaeologists also recovered an 881-pound granite anchor pole--the largest ever found in the Aegean--that likely belonged to a massive ship from the sixth century.

http://en.protothema.gr/amazing-archaeological-discovery-of-6th-century-bc-anchor-in-aegean-sea-points-to-colossal-ship/

https://www.archaeology.org/news/7889-190808-greece-aegean-shipwrecks

 

(July 26)   Excavation near Swiss archaeological site reveals array of neolithic standing stones:

Quote

The find was made by chance during work for a new residential building in the Petit-Chasseur quarter of the cantonal capital Sion. This is the same area where, in the 1960s, several dolmens (collective tombs) and some 30 standing stones were found.  

Three of the recently found standing stones are engraved with markings. The biggest find is a stone weighing nearly two tonnes bearing a representation of a male figure wearing geometrically patterned clothing and with a sun-like motif around his face. 

                                 big-stone.jpg.70ffb8056b4cd952ebf86d58dbbb77dc.jpg

                                                                                                                     photo credit: (SBMA - ARIA SA)

https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/neolithic-find-_standing-stones-uncovered-near-important-archaeological-site-/45123782

 

(Aug 1)  Largest found Iberian era building discovered in Spain on compound site originating in the Bronze Age:

Quote

[...]   this eight-hectare archeological site known as La Cava is “a series of time capsules.” When archeologists opened it, they found the largest Iberian building known to date, complete with three rooms more than three meters high.

“There’s nothing like it that we know of, but we’re still investigating,” says Miguel Ángel Valero, professor of ancient history at the University of Castilla-La Mancha. “What we usually find in these kinds of digs are the remains of walls made of stone or adobe, which every now and again rise above a meter high.”

        1564076383_701088_1564135551_noticia_fotograma.jpg.90cfd168ba694603e24400a362a6407f.jpg

                                                                                                              photo credit:  Víctor Sainz / EP Vídeo

https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/07/31/inenglish/1564581392_334041.html

 

 (July 23)  Lost mound discovered at Mississippi's Natchez Native American site:

Quote

Until recently only three mounds were known to exist at the Grand Village of the Natchez Indians historic site.

Recent archaeological studies of the land reveal new secrets to the ceremonial site of mound-building Native Americans in Southwest Mississippi.

The face of the Grand Village has changed over centuries of erosion, plowing and other work done on the site, Grand Village director Lance Harris said, adding ongoing archaeological studies may change the Grand Village once again — this time restoring some of what was lost.

https://www.magnoliastatelive.com/2019/07/23/archaeologists-reveal-evidence-of-lost-indian-mound-at-historic-mississippi-site/.

                   

Edited by The Wistman
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Piney
On 7/26/2019 at 8:01 PM, ScotDeerie said:

Uh oh. Can someone recommend something herbal for my butt ache?

 

A new ass. Your's has a crack in it. 

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Hanslune

Archaeologists Shed Light on Mysterious Neolithic Society Behind Rise of Ancient Egypt

Quote

To many, ancient Egypt is synonymous with the pharaohs and pyramids of the Dynastic period starting about 3,100BC. Yet long before that, about 9,300-4,000BC, enigmatic Neolithic peoples flourished. Indeed, it was the lifestyles and cultural innovations of these peoples that provided the very foundation for the advanced civilisations to come.

https://www.sciencealert.com/archaeologists-reveal-a-mysterious-neolithic-society-that-enabled-the-rise-of-ancient-egypt

 

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jaylemurph
1 hour ago, Hanslune said:

Archaeologists Shed Light on Mysterious Neolithic Society Behind Rise of Ancient Egypt

https://www.sciencealert.com/archaeologists-reveal-a-mysterious-neolithic-society-that-enabled-the-rise-of-ancient-egypt

 

I didn't see anything about Hounds in this, but we get a lot of phringe sources these days...

--Jaylemurph 

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Piney
1 hour ago, Hanslune said:
Quote

To many, ancient Egypt is synonymous with the pharaohs and pyramids of the Dynastic period starting about 3,100BC.

:td: :sleepy:

Yet long before that, about 9,300-4,000BC, enigmatic Neolithic peoples flourished. Indeed, it was the lifestyles and cultural innovations of these peoples that provided the very foundation for the advanced civilisations to come.

:clap: :su :su :su  :clap:

 

 

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The Wistman
34 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

I didn't see anything about Hounds in this, but we get a lot of phringe sources these days...

--Jaylemurph 

There's a theory as to why they left no traces.

giphy.gif

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Piney

Another nail in the coffins of the "Out of India" and "Out of Anatolia" hypothesis's for PIE.

I've been straight up "Steppe Hypothesis" since I read Marija Gimbutas.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190905145348.htm

 

 

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jaylemurph
1 hour ago, Piney said:

Another nail in the coffins of the "Out of India" and "Out of Anatolia" hypothesis's for PIE.

I've been straight up "Steppe Hypothesis" since I read Marija Gimbutas.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190905145348.htm

I don't have time to real the full articles in Nature and Cell, but I'm hoping they don't make too many inferences about language spoken and genetics. I was somewhat surprised to see that in the Science Daily write-up and I'm hoping it's just bad/over-simplistic journalism.

Steppes for lie-eef.

--Jaylemurph

Edited by jaylemurph
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Piney
1 hour ago, jaylemurph said:

Steppes for lie-eef.

 

:nw: I offer my ham....

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Hanslune

Got Milk?

_108740290_mediaitem108740289.jpg

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49650806

Earliest direct evidence of milk consumption

""The team identified milk protein entombed in dental plaque on the teeth of prehistoric farmers from Britain.

It shows that humans were consuming dairy products as early as 6,000 years ago - despite being lactose intolerant.""

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Alchopwn
On 6/19/2019 at 7:22 AM, Piney said:

I know, and it's one of my most hated movies.

Real woodjins would treat you very well. 

Piney, I think there are good and bad folk in most communities.  I know there are very hospitable, educated and fine people in WV, as I have met enough, and I would be the last person to say that I approved of the implicit class war involved in "redneck shaming", but there are also some dangerous hollows in WV with some pretty bad hombres living there too.  WV needs all kinds of federal assistance imo, it is beyond a joke, like Detroit.

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Sir Wearer of Hats
5 hours ago, Hanslune said:

Got Milk?

_108740290_mediaitem108740289.jpg

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49650806

Earliest direct evidence of milk consumption

""The team identified milk protein entombed in dental plaque on the teeth of prehistoric farmers from Britain.

It shows that humans were consuming dairy products as early as 6,000 years ago - despite being lactose intolerant.""

Of all this historical conversations I want to hear, the “the stuff coming out of one of that cow’s wobbly things might taste nice if we drink it” must be in the top ten.

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Piney
2 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

Piney, I think there are good and bad folk in most communities.  I know there are very hospitable, educated and fine people in WV, as I have met enough, and I would be the last person to say that I approved of the implicit class war involved in "redneck shaming", but there are also some dangerous hollows in WV with some pretty bad hombres living there too.  WV needs all kinds of federal assistance imo, it is beyond a joke, like Detroit.

Drugs...Opioid dealers and addicts and meth cookers. Rural WV and the Pine Barrens went the same route. I know a lady who runs a market in Buchanan who can't find any help because nobody in the county who applied passed a drug test 

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Hanslune
2 hours ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

Of all this historical conversations I want to hear, the “the stuff coming out of one of that cow’s wobbly things might taste nice if we drink it” must be in the top ten.

That and the guy/gal who first opened an oyster and said, 'hmmmm that looks absolutely disgusting - yep I'm gonna eat it.'

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Piney
2 hours ago, Hanslune said:

That and the guy/gal who first opened an oyster and said, 'hmmmm that looks absolutely disgusting - yep I'm gonna eat it.'

The Anatolian Neolithic farmers had sheep and goats in that area. Do you think they might of brought them when they sailed around and founded the Atlantic Neolithic Culture?

@Mellon Man Has any goat or sheep remains been found in British Neolithic sites? 

4 hours ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

Of all this historical conversations I want to hear, the “the stuff coming out of one of that cow’s wobbly things might taste nice if we drink it” must be in the top ten.

If folks got it from their mommies I'm sure it wouldn't be hard to figure out. My people took the milk from pregnant does and cooked with it. 

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danydandan
2 hours ago, Piney said:

The Anatolian Neolithic farmers had sheep and goats in that area. Do you think they might of brought them when they sailed around and founded the Atlantic Neolithic Culture?

@Mellon Man Has any goat or sheep remains been found in British Neolithic sites? 

If folks got it from their mommies I'm sure it wouldn't be hard to figure out. My people took the milk from pregnant does and cooked with it. 

I think, not sure so I might be wrong (as I am sure I heard it on a podcast), that domesticated sheep remains were excavated in France around 5000-7000 BCE.

So in other words, they may have made it to Britain but..... anyways I didn't really answer your question which was directed at someone else anyways. Lol.

Edited by danydandan
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Alchopwn
20 hours ago, Piney said:

Drugs...Opioid dealers and addicts and meth cookers. Rural WV and the Pine Barrens went the same route. I know a lady who runs a market in Buchanan who can't find any help because nobody in the county who applied passed a drug test 

The USA badly needs to decriminalize drug use and sale. I read this article about a prison in New Mexico that will close unless the state finds it 300 fresh inmates.  I personally find the whole "success story" of privatized prisons very objectionable and a huge threat to the liberty of every US Citizen, as where are they gonna get 300 fresh inmates at short notice?  They'll just go and scoop a bunch of harmless pot heads who would otherwise fly under the radar.  Those people will come out of the jail system angry, unemployable, trained and ready to commit far worse crimes, and all because someone's great grandma has never smoked a reefer and thinks it turns you into the devil.  Of course the real reason for these stupid laws is the law enforcement powers and budgets that they make possible by stripping citizens of their liberties.

As for the lady with the market, perhaps she really needs to lower her standards and just look for someone who wants to get off drugs instead?  Maybe she should opt to drop the drug test altogether given the unreasonable circumstances that WV represents.

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Alchopwn
20 hours ago, Hanslune said:

That and the guy/gal who first opened an oyster and said, 'hmmmm that looks absolutely disgusting - yep I'm gonna eat it.'

Blame the South Africans for that LINK.  

"He was a bold man that first ate an oyster." - Johnathan Swift

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