Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
kmt_sesh

Let's talk history

3,062 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Piney
3 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

As for the lady with the market, perhaps she really needs to lower her standards and just look for someone who wants to get off drugs instead?  Maybe she should opt to drop the drug test altogether given the unreasonable circumstances that WV represents.

She would but it's corporate owned.

And I know all about privatized prisons. I was in one for 3 years. :lol:

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hanslune
7 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

Blame the South Africans for that LINK.  

"He was a bold man that first ate an oyster." - Johnathan Swift

I must have gotten that idea from old Swifty whom I read many years before. Yes middens are always a good view of what people were subsisting on.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
1 hour ago, Hanslune said:

I must have gotten that idea from old Swifty whom I read many years before. Yes middens are always a good view of what people were subsisting on.

And in the case of Southern Unami and Nanticoke, who was buried in one.

No grave goods ever so I'm guessing "undesirables". 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Golden Duck
20 hours ago, Alchopwn said:

Blame the South Africans for that LINK.  

"He was a bold man that first ate an oyster." - Johnathan Swift

As it turns out, they taste like where they come from - the ocean.

Yet people still drink kava.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sir Wearer of Hats
20 hours ago, Golden Duck said:

As it turns out, they taste like where they come from - the ocean.

Yet people still drink kava.

What’s kava when it’s at home?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jaylemurph
1 hour ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

What’s kava when it’s at home?

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-872/kava

Pepper extract. 

—Jaylemurph 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot

Not exactly history related, but was able to get some Cedar of Lebanon and turned a bowl from one. 

Cedar of Lebanon Bowl https://imgur.com/gallery/WWS4k8N

Kind of fascinating to read how many different cultures made use of it. 

It's pretty rare to come up for sale now, being its pretty rare 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cormac mac airt
8 minutes ago, ShadowSot said:

Not exactly history related, but was able to get some Cedar of Lebanon and turned a bowl from one. 

Cedar of Lebanon Bowl https://imgur.com/gallery/WWS4k8N

Kind of fascinating to read how many different cultures made use of it. 

It's pretty rare to come up for sale now, being its pretty rare 

Nice work. 

cormac

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
1 hour ago, ShadowSot said:

It's pretty rare to come up for sale now, being its pretty rare 

Blue Atlas cedar. It's a sub-species and has the same grain and oil. I saw them all the time. 

American cedars are all junipers or cypresses.  Lebanon cedar, a true cedar,smells milder and sweeter. 

Edited by Piney
**** Atlantis
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Swede
9 minutes ago, Piney said:

Blue Atlas cedar. It's a sub-species and has the same grain and oil. I saw them all the time. 

American cedars are all junipers.  Lebanon cedar, a true cedar,smells milder and sweeter. 

No, they are not. You would appear to be referring to "red cedar".

.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
1 minute ago, Swede said:

No, they are not. You would appear to be referring to "red cedar".

Your right. Atlantic Whites are cypresses. I forgot.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
2 minutes ago, Swede said:

No, they are not. You would appear to be referring to "red cedar".

.

I edited it.  My bad...:unsure2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot
1 hour ago, Piney said:

Blue Atlas cedar. It's a sub-species and has the same grain and oil. I saw them all the time. 

American cedars are all junipers or cypresses.  Lebanon cedar, a true cedar,smells milder and sweeter. 

Checking on it, it's listed as endangered versus the vulnerable status Lebanese cedar has. 

 I have a good amount of red cedar,love the smell. 

 I mainly got it for the history connection. It's good looking wood, but more into the history. Still have two pieces I've out aside for later when I've got more skill. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
5 minutes ago, ShadowSot said:

Checking on it, it's listed as endangered versus the vulnerable status Lebanese cedar has. 

 I have a good amount of red cedar,love the smell. 

 I mainly got it for the history connection. It's good looking wood, but more into the history. Still have two pieces I've out aside for later when I've got more skill. 

Presbyterians in the Pine Barrens planted the Blue Atlas sub-species as yard trees in the 1800s. So I have easy access to it. Since it isn't indigenous here I can saw as much as I want. The only thing they worry about here is Atlantic White which is threatened from sea level rise and American Holly which has **** for grain and is too soft.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot
14 minutes ago, Piney said:

Presbyterians in the Pine Barrens planted the Blue Atlas sub-species as yard trees in the 1800s. So I have easy access to it. Since it isn't indigenous here I can saw as much as I want. The only thing they worry about here is Atlantic White which is threatened from sea level rise and American Holly which has **** for grain and is too soft.

 

 Very little good wood here for turning, but I get some surprising stuff off of pallets. 

 A buddy of mine though is clearing his property and someone planted a bunch of different species that aren't native to the area. 

 It's a bit of a mystery, since there's nothing showing up on property records and most of the trees are second or third generation growth. 

 Too recent to be related to the historic lumber yard, and wrong species. 

 But too old to be related to development in the area around the 50s or the house itself that was built in the 70s.

 This area is still pretty rural and would have only been more so at the time. 

Most of the trees at least originated in Asia, which is interesting. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harte
1 hour ago, Piney said:

Presbyterians in the Pine Barrens planted the Blue Atlas sub-species as yard trees in the 1800s. So I have easy access to it. Since it isn't indigenous here I can saw as much as I want. The only thing they worry about here is Atlantic White which is threatened from sea level rise and American Holly which has **** for grain and is too soft.

American Holly evolved these traits in response to the woodwright invasion.

A successful adaptation.

Harte

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
25 minutes ago, ShadowSot said:

 A buddy of mine though is clearing his property and someone planted a bunch of different species that aren't native to the area. 

It might of been planted by a experimental nursery in the 19th century. I know a few of them around the abandon towns. 

27 minutes ago, ShadowSot said:

Most of the trees at least originated in Asia, which is interesting. 

Not really. In the same century I mentioned above people were introducing all kinds of stuff from Asia.

28 minutes ago, ShadowSot said:

 Very little good wood here for turning, but I get some surprising stuff off of pallets. 

If you can find a music story piano pallets are mahogany. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
4 minutes ago, Harte said:

American Holly evolved these traits in response to the woodwright invasion.

Not from any Indian one. Algonquians think they contain ghosts of people who died from violence or a accident in the forest. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot
46 minutes ago, Piney said:

It might of been planted by a experimental nursery in the 19th century. I know a few of them around the abandon towns. 

Not really. In the same century I mentioned above people were introducing all kinds of stuff from Asia.

If you can find a music story piano pallets are mahogany. 

No records to show anything out here, undeveloped until the 50s. This part of Florida it doesn't really make sense. The local history club doesn't show anything out that way. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot

Not saying you're wrong, just no records that would show it. Best suggestion available though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oniomancer
3 hours ago, Harte said:

American Holly evolved these traits in response to the woodwright invasion.

A successful adaptation.

Harte

Not as much as you might think. It's considered primo carving wood for precisely the 2 attributes piney cited.

As to the other, Florida is the invasive species capital of the US. Possible escapees from another property? Or maybe somebody got a deal on some seedlings from a nursery and planted out the leftovers? That's pretty much how my parents and my aunt and uncle divied up a batch of pines way back when.

Interesting grain on that stuff though. I don't think I've ever seen it worked before.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
13 hours ago, Oniomancer said:

Interesting grain on that stuff though. I don't think I've ever seen it worked before.

Blue Atlas/ Lebanon? 

13 hours ago, Oniomancer said:

Not as much as you might think. It's considered primo carving wood for precisely the 2 attributes piney cited.

I only use it to chainsaw out knicky-knacky crap like Totem poles, Tikis and Bears.  It's primo for crap like that but if you want pretty grain or durable kitchen stuff that won't go moldy it's not the thing to use.

I only use white or red oak for utensils and cutting boards because it's durable and has anti-bacterial properties.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oniomancer
2 hours ago, Piney said:

Blue Atlas/ Lebanon? 

Yes.

2 hours ago, Piney said:

I only use it to chainsaw out knicky-knacky crap like Totem poles, Tikis and Bears.  It's primo for crap like that but if you want pretty grain or durable kitchen stuff that won't go moldy it's not the thing to use.

I only use white or red oak for utensils and cutting boards because it's durable and has anti-bacterial properties.

There's carving and there's carving... ;)

It has very white wood (Apparently If it's cut when the sap is down) which I gather makes it desirable for contrast accents and inlays.

Several of the the resources I checked say it's also good for turning. (Might want to bag it if it's being green turned.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
27 minutes ago, Oniomancer said:

It has very white wood (Apparently If it's cut when the sap is down) which I gather makes it desirable for contrast accents and inlays.

Yellow poplar and yellow pine is the desired wood for that among custom millworkers and cabinet makers here. 

Yellow poplar was also used as a underlayment for high end laminated furniture and cabinets. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.