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kmt_sesh

Let's talk history

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Mellon Man
On 11/24/2019 at 1:01 PM, Mello_ said:

How do we know that Sea peeps destroyed Hatuşa?

As others have rightfully said, we don't. 

The most popular opnion at the moment, is the combination of multiple factors thesis, with natural disasters as a major contributor.

Personally, I find Dr. Robert Drews military thesis interesting. Although I would be very reluctant to agree with his conclusion (the decline of chariot supremacy being the main factor for the collapse), I do believe his thesis deserve more investigation. 

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Mello_

Ok. Thanx guys.

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Hanslune

I rather liked this map. It shows the land area of all the solar systems planets in a 'continent' size land mass along with our Earth.

main-qimg-6331a3b5316a34420cf3a266d8cd05

 

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Festina Lente
On 11/22/2019 at 6:55 AM, BorizBadinov said:

What fascinates me about Egyptian carvers is that they could perfectly depict an animal hoof or bird in great detail and yet distort human features such as hands and feet. It seems there must have been some esthetic to that style since the statuary is often perfect in detail of human features. 

A very Interesting observation that I have never given much thought but noticed it as well.  

 

 

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Orphalesion
On 11/29/2019 at 4:53 AM, Hanslune said:

I rather liked this map. It shows the land area of all the solar systems planets in a 'continent' size land mass along with our Earth.

main-qimg-6331a3b5316a34420cf3a266d8cd05

 

Love this map :-)

And you know it illustrates another, glaring problem with the "let's colonize Mars!" idea. It's freaking small. Then again, I suppose it doesn't have any oceans.

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Harte

The map is incomplete. It would be a speck on Jupiter's surface, I suppose.

Harte

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jaylemurph
20 minutes ago, Harte said:

The map is incomplete. It would be a speck on Jupiter's surface, I suppose.

Harte

/Land/ area, not surface area. Last I heard, from a former Mr Dr le Murph (who was an astrophysicist), many astrophysics don’t think there even is a solid Jovian core. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Orphalesion
17 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

/Land/ area, not surface area. Last I heard, from a former Mr Dr le Murph (who was an astrophysicist), many astrophysics don’t think there even is a solid Jovian core. 

—Jaylemurph 


It just sorta turns more dense and eventually liquid the further you go inside, eh?

I know it's unlikely but I'm still holding out for some sort of exotic, floating organisms living in some atmospheric layer of the gas giants :-P

 

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Piney
35 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

/Land/ area, not surface area. Last I heard, from a former Mr Dr le Murph (who was an astrophysicist), many astrophysics don’t think there even is a solid Jovian core. 

—Jaylemurph 

There has to be. You need gravity to hold that gas. It's probably Fe-Ni and carbon and the ice giants are probably mostly carbon. 

Mercury might be a gas giant core that was stripped by the sun. It has many of the signs.

Edited by Piney
**** Atlantis
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Harte
2 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

/Land/ area, not surface area. Last I heard, from a former Mr Dr le Murph (who was an astrophysicist), many astrophysics don’t think there even is a solid Jovian core. 

—Jaylemurph 

Too bad for them. They should have put it on there anyway. Most of Earth is liquid.

Harte

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Harte
22 hours ago, Piney said:

There has to be. You need gravity to hold that gas. It's probably Fe-Ni and carbon and the ice giants are probably mostly carbon. 

Mercury might be a gas giant core that was stripped by the sun. It has many of the signs.

Depends on what you mean by "solid."

Seems to me at those pressures there would be something "solid" since gases compress. But you wouldn't want to walk around on it.

Same could be said for the other planets too, though. I wouldn't care to take a stroll on Venus, or Mercury.

Harte

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Piney
1 minute ago, Harte said:

Depends on what you mean by "solid.

From the probe results it looks like mostly Fe and silica with some smaller amounts of metals and minerals. It's been hypothesized that it absorbed a small "super earth"  adding even more elements but those things can only be solids under those pressures because the next layer is supercritical H and He. 

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Piney

Archaeological evidence for pre-Clovis peopling of America.

https://www.academia.edu/23890735/Questioning_the_Past_Archaeological_Evidence_for_pre-Clovis_Peopling_of_North_America?email_work_card=view-paper

I just got it. I didn't read it. So don't ask me anything. :yes:

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Hanslune

https://poseidon01.ssrn.com/delivery.php?ID=171094066115020090114118109003124096025047071016027028067090071098013019005029073102030099002020054112125067116069080125104117038073039053068116000081070119069117070046062067003098093019025007023069027005085124093120080114010085082031027084077006118082&EXT=pdf

Neolithic mounds of Tassili and Amguid in the satellite Google Maps (Sahara desert)

 

Quote

Another writer and explorer, who visited several times this part of the Sahara, was Cino Boccazzi (1916 – 2009). In, Boccazzi writes of some mounds having the shape of “stone flying swallows” in the region of Amguid. The Amguid is a meteorite crater, with a 450 m diameter and an age estimated to be less than 100,000 years. The crater is exposed at the surface and clearly visible in the satellite images. We can use again the Google Maps to check whether the mounds mentioned by Boccazzi are visible. Studying the stone circles of Arabia, it seems that the Neolithic humans preferred some peculiar locations on hills to build them (see the Figure 3 of Reference 12): searching for the same locations near the Amguid crater, we can find some of the “flying swallows” made of stones (Figure 2). Besides these structures, there are other stone mounds having a different shape of the enclosure (Figure 3). Again, as shown and concluded in, the use of Google Maps or, in general, of satellite services devoted to the analysis of landscapes and built environments, can give useful information for archaeological studies, sometimes even accompanied by information on the past climatic conditions of the places.

 

Edited by Hanslune
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ShadowSot

More history merch than history itself. Anyone interested in some pens made with cedar of Lebanon? 

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Piney
2 hours ago, ShadowSot said:

More history merch than history itself. Anyone interested in some pens made with cedar of Lebanon? 

Lebanon or Blue Atlas? Blue Atlas is actually a sub-species and only a botanist can tell them apart...........sweetest smelling wood in the world though. :yes:

 

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ShadowSot
2 hours ago, Piney said:

Lebanon or Blue Atlas? Blue Atlas is actually a sub-species and only a botanist can tell them apart...........sweetest smelling wood in the world though. :yes:

 

Purchased from a reputable vendor, so should be Lebanon. To me it has a more spicy oily scent. But my sense of smell is a bit crosswired 

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Hanslune
Piney
1 hour ago, Polar said:

Can anyone tell whether this is true or not? I always thought it an invention:

True.....from the looks of it.

I always called them "Head deodorizers". This was a shock because I thought they always knew of their existence and had proof.

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Orphalesion
17 minutes ago, Piney said:

True.....from the looks of it.

I always called them "Head deodorizers". This was a shock because I thought they always knew of their existence and had proof.

Same here I read that in a children's book on Egypt when I was like 8. Had no  clue that they only had found archeological proof of them now.

What I'm really curious is what the headpiece Nefertiti wore in that famous bust was made off, my guess is heavily starched/pressed cloth? 

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Piney
1 hour ago, Orphalesion said:

What I'm really curious is what the headpiece Nefertiti wore in that famous bust was made off, my guess is heavily starched/pressed cloth? 

Like the Greek's linen armour? 

I also thought that was some form of gilded papyrus "paper mache". :lol:

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Orphalesion
59 minutes ago, Piney said:

Like the Greek's linen armour?

Yeah kinda,a t least that how I could picture it happen, or possibly cloth stretched over a thin, cushioned metal/gold frame.
Though now that I think about it, some sort of paper mache attached to a headband would also make sense...
I suppose it didn't have to be sturdy, just look good during public appearances. And be light enough that Nefertiti's slender neck doesn't suffer during audiences and ceremonies.

Maybe we are lucky and one of our resident Egypt scholars can shed light on this question?

Edited by Orphalesion
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kmt_sesh
3 hours ago, Orphalesion said:

Same here I read that in a children's book on Egypt when I was like 8. Had no  clue that they only had found archeological proof of them now.

What I'm really curious is what the headpiece Nefertiti wore in that famous bust was made off, my guess is heavily starched/pressed cloth? 

We can't know for certain because nothin like it has been found in the archaeological record, but it may well have been leather stretched over some kind of form.

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