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kmt_sesh

Let's talk history

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cormac mac airt

Since it was his thread and for anyone who hasn’t heard, Saru has posted a memorial in the Community Lounge area for Kmt_sesh. 
 

cormac

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jaylemurph
13 minutes ago, cormac mac airt said:

Since it was his thread and for anyone who hasn’t heard, Saru has posted a memorial in the Community Lounge area for Kmt_sesh. 
 

cormac

What?

That’s awful news. Kmt was a stand-up guy and a great mod. Fiercely knowledgeable, to boot. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Windowpane
11 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

...

That’s awful news. Kmt was a stand-up guy and a great mod. Fiercely knowledgeable, to boot. 

...

He'll be sorely missed.

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Hanslune

https://www.world-archaeology.com/features/cooking-cereals-in-prehistoric-china/amp/

 

Quote

The study, carried out by researchers from Washington University, was recently published in the journal PLOS ONE (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0240930). Using existing stable carbon-and nitrogen-isotope data from 2,448 human remains from 128 sites across China, they analysed what these individuals were eating and how dietary patterns changed from 6000 BC to AD 220.

Isotopic analysis revealed evidence of a north/south divide in diets between 6000 and 2000 BC, with people in the Loess Plateau predominantly eating millet, while those further south in the region around the Yangtze and Huai rivers had diets of rice combined with a variety of fruits, nuts, and tubers. It is believed that these differences were connected to environmental conditions, as millet is best suited to the semi-arid conditions of the Loess Plateau, but an aquatic plant like rice would have flourished in the wetlands of the Yangtze–Huai region.

Map-Chinese-crops-e1611854086366.jpg?w=6

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Piney

Problems with Stanford and Bradley's Solutrean-Clovis hypothesis........Welll......the whole thing has problems.....

https://www.academia.edu/5119515/On_thin_ice_Problems_with_Stanford_and_Bradley_s_Solutrean_Clovis_hypothesis?email_work_card=title

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Hanslune

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Hanslune
1 hour ago, Hanslune said:

https://www.academia.edu/29256504/Telluric_Techne_and_the_Lithic_Production_of_Tiwanaku?email_work_card=view-paper

Paper on quarries and stone masonry subjects for Tiwanaku and Khonkho Wankane

h0WPWRA.jpg

CrbY5nM.jpg

voAPKoK.jpg

xenTrEr.jpg

 

 

Oops, left off one of the key links: https://escholarship.org/uc/item/5hf42218 More about Khonkho Wankane

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jaylemurph

That map seems to locate Copacabana in Peru, but Barry Mannilow clearly says it's north of Havana.

Why do you press us with dirty lies?!

--Jaylemurph (with his dress cut down to there)

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Hanslune
1 hour ago, jaylemurph said:

That map seems to locate Copacabana in Peru, but Barry Mannilow clearly says it's north of Havana.

Why do you press us with dirty lies?!

--Jaylemurph (with his dress cut down to there)

It is north. You just go around the north pole, keep going around and you'll in up at Lake Titicaca.

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Piney

A good paper explaining the Richat Dome ( Eye of Africa) that hasn't been tampered with by Atlanteans who live in C-ration cans.

https://www.academia.edu/9220436/The_eye_of_Africa_Richat_dome_Mauritania_An_isolated_Cretaceous_alkaline_hydrothermal_complex?email_work_card=view-paper

I like the idea of a huge hydrothermal complex. 

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Hanslune
6 hours ago, Piney said:

A good paper explaining the Richat Dome ( Eye of Africa) that hasn't been tampered with by Atlanteans who live in C-ration cans.

https://www.academia.edu/9220436/The_eye_of_Africa_Richat_dome_Mauritania_An_isolated_Cretaceous_alkaline_hydrothermal_complex?email_work_card=view-paper

I like the idea of a huge hydrothermal complex. 

What a low rent C- ration can? Only a low life like a Lemurian would live in one of those or so Rupert suggests. Hormel Chili (no beans) cans are the penthouses of Atlantean domesticate housing.

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Tatetopa

Question for anybody.  I saw a special about a Canadian archeologist Sutherland, excavating a site on Baffin Island.  She took over from the guy who found it in the 60's. 

They claim to have found fragments of at least one Norse style whetstone with micro chips of iron and copper embedded in the surface, a piece of a Scandinavian style trader's scale, also pieces of elm and other wood not found in the area.  Furthermore the claim is that the building remains are in a Norse pattern.    Many Dorset artifacts present  and the depth of the deposits are interpreted as evidence of a trading post that was occupied for many summer seasons..

I had never heard of this site.  Does it stand up to scrutiny and peer review?

 

 

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Hanslune
10 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

Question for anybody.  I saw a special about a Canadian archeologist Sutherland, excavating a site on Baffin Island.  She took over from the guy who found it in the 60's. 

They claim to have found fragments of at least one Norse style whetstone with micro chips of iron and copper embedded in the surface, a piece of a Scandinavian style trader's scale, also pieces of elm and other wood not found in the area.  Furthermore the claim is that the building remains are in a Norse pattern.    Many Dorset artifacts present  and the depth of the deposits are interpreted as evidence of a trading post that was occupied for many summer seasons..

I had never heard of this site.  Does it stand up to scrutiny and peer review?

I've been following it for some time:

She is the center of controveresy related to her finds

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Until April 2012, she was also employed at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, now the Canadian Museum of History, most recently as curator of Arctic archaeology. She was the only female archaeologist working there. It has been speculated, including by the CBC programme The Fifth Estate, that she was let go because her research no longer fit with the changed focus of the museum on Canadian history, and some have suggested that the political motivation extends to a fear that her research will undermine Canadian sovereignty claims in the high Arctic.Other speculation points to her having been one of six staff of the museum who wrote a letter objecting on moral grounds to its acquisition of a collection of artifacts taken from the wreck of RMS Empress of Ireland. When Sutherland was fired, her access to her research materials was cut off and many were dispersed. There have been calls by fellow archaeologists and a petition for her to be allowed to resume her research.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patricia_Sutherland

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/gea.21497

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/121019-viking-outpost-second-new-canada-science-sutherland

 

 

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jaylemurph

According to the relevant Sagas — the Greendlanders’ saga and the Saga of Erik ths Red, I believe — there was regular contact established in North America, so it doesn’t sound unreasonable on its face. 

And so far as I know, the sagas weren’t used as a political or propaganda tool (at least, not outside of Iceland), so they tend to be reasonably trustworthy. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Hanslune
2 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

According to the relevant Sagas — the Greendlanders’ saga and the Saga of Erik ths Red, I believe — there was regular contact established in North America, so it doesn’t sound unreasonable on its face. 

And so far as I know, the sagas weren’t used as a political or propaganda tool (at least, not outside of Iceland), so they tend to be reasonably trustworthy. 

—Jaylemurph 

A friend of mine spent decades in New England, PIE, Newfoundland etc., (he was a contract archeologist for the state of Maine) looking for traces of the Norse interaction with the NA. He was sure that later colonies would have built over places they would have stayed at. Never found anything. He was always looking for another 'Maine penny'.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maine_penny

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Hanslune

In discussions of various ages; Iron, stone, copper etc., one must not forget the most unforgiving age:

155483206_3958364320882603_6226559659171

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Hanslune

https://www.asor.org/anetoday/2021/03/cosmic-impact-abu-hureyra

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A Cosmic Impact and the Beginning of Farming at Abu Hureyra in Syria

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Towards the end of the last Ice Age a group of hunter-gatherers settled at Abu Hureyra in the Euphrates Valley in what is now Syria. The site was ideally located on a terrace close to the Euphrates River and yet safe from seasonal flooding. These hunter-gatherers were attracted by the abundant and varied plants that grew in the valley bottom and nearby open woodland.

Fig8-300x189.jpg

Fig2.jpg

Fig1.jpg

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Hanslune
Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Hans

Great read thanks for posting it

jmccr8

Another one of the pesky tells (mounds) we were talking about earlier. Man if Iraq, Syria and the rest of that area can ever become politically stable there is some serious archaeology to do in that region.

Edited by Hanslune
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Manwon Lender
41 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

Another one of the pesky tells (mounds) we were talking about earlier. Man if Iraq, Syria and the rest of that area can ever become politically stable there is some serious archaeology to do in that region.

I agree that area of Mesopotamia is the cradle of civilization there is no telling how much history is buried under the sand, that is still untouched.

Thanks for sharing

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Piney

Lot's of poop in this article. There was no population decline in North and S0uth America, massive areas of burnt vegetation, nor a fast die off of megafauna.

This might of been a localised event but not proof of the YDI. 

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