Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
kmt_sesh

Let's talk history

4,029 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Hanslune
3 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

1177 BCE by Ernest Cline is a good one.

--Jaylemurph

Rupert sighed and said that was a good year although he knew it as year 1y,459,232.7~x2 of the Atlantean calendar

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot
15 hours ago, Wepwawet said:

Not books as such, but radio broadcasts dealing with a wide range of topics discussed by experts. Ancient History features often. The programme is from the BBC as is titled "In our Time". The link is to the archive page with 908 broadcasts available. You do need to create an account though, which is odd considering they are also available on Youtube, but that's not what you want, though you can sample them to see if you think they are worth the bother. In Our Time

Cheers but it's on my list of podcasts already. Im looking for something more long form. 

6 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

1177 BCE by Ernest Cline is a good one.

--Jaylemurph

Cheers, that's a great suggestion. Completely forgot to load it after seeing an interview with Cline. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hanslune

https://www.academia.edu/45492269/The_Minor_Pyramids_of_Giza_Part_3_GIII_a_GIII_b_GIII_c_A_Laymans_Guide?email_work_card=view-paper

Quote

The Minor Pyramids of Giza, Part 3, GIII-a, GIII-b, GIII-c : A Layman's Guide

1-a73cceac1d.jpg

11-b7512632eb.jpg

 

 

29-527685c565.jpg

24-9e55ba436a.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MDagger
20 hours ago, Hanslune said:

I do find Keith Hamilton's "Layman's Guides" quite interesting as he uses detailed historical and recent information as well as photos and drawings.

Sad that the three minor 'queens's' pyramids south of Menkaure’s pyramid has had no recent substructure exploration since 1837.  Also interesting info on the pyramids' temples.  

 

MDagger

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hanslune
3 minutes ago, MDagger said:

I do find Keith Hamilton's "Layman's Guides" quite interesting as he uses detailed historical and recent information as well as photos and drawings.

Sad that the three minor 'queens's' pyramids south of Menkaure’s pyramid has had no recent substructure exploration since 1837.  Also interesting info on the pyramids' temples.  

 

MDagger

Yes I eager await all of his work. Very valuable contributions to understanding those ruins and their context. Oh, and he answers questions and can be found at the Hall of Ma'at as 'Waggy'.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hanslune

Speaking of stones, ah stone tools

188922124_529255328449777_70724668363625

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Windowpane
2 hours ago, Hanslune said:

Yes I eager await all of his work. Very valuable contributions to understanding those ruins and their context. Oh, and he answers questions and can be found at the Hall of Ma'at as 'Waggy'.

There's a list of all known Waggy's Guides here.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot

Meet me in Atlantis is a fun book for the skeptically minded. A few things get a pass, but it's a fun overview of the various claims and the people who believe them. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hanslune
12 minutes ago, ShadowSot said:

Meet me in Atlantis is a fun book for the skeptically minded. A few things get a pass, but it's a fun overview of the various claims and the people who believe them. 

617BsaJ8iWL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

This one?

I'm awaiting the channeled one called Betwixt Mu and Lemuria: A guide to not finding these. This will be by Rupert but he insists in writing it out fully as an inscription using a piece of flint. He's still on the Title Paper after eight months. Oh, he's also doing it on 8.5 x 11 foot (2.6 x 3.35 meter) granite slabs.

  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot
1 hour ago, Hanslune said:

617BsaJ8iWL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

This one?

I'm awaiting the channeled one called Betwixt Mu and Lemuria: A guide to not finding these. This will be by Rupert but he insists in writing it out fully as an inscription using a piece of flint. He's still on the Title Paper after eight months. Oh, he's also doing it on 8.5 x 11 foot (2.6 x 3.35 meter) granite slabs.

Indeed. Even made sure to check the authors name before posting, d'oh. 

 It was enjoyable. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot

Anyone encountered a claim about an Egyptian island called Mou? First I've heard of it, and it's being associated with Atlantis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harte
6 hours ago, ShadowSot said:

Anyone encountered a claim about an Egyptian island called Mou? First I've heard of it, and it's being associated with Atlantis

I've got nothing here. Link?

Harte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot
1 hour ago, Harte said:

I've got nothing here. Link?

Harte

Its just someone jawing on Facebook. It's completely new to me. Based on the context seems like a Hancock devote but it's the first time I've heard it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harte

Maybe a misspelling?

Harte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sir Wearer of Hats
18 hours ago, ShadowSot said:

Anyone encountered a claim about an Egyptian island called Mou? First I've heard of it, and it's being associated with Atlantis

It’s where all the cows came from.

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jaylemurph
19 hours ago, ShadowSot said:

Anyone encountered a claim about an Egyptian island called Mou? First I've heard of it, and it's being associated with Atlantis

It sounds a lot like a crank trying to establish the idea of Mu before the 19th Century. 

Not that respect for historiographic rigor ever kept phringers from adopting sus beliefs. 

—Jaylemurph 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harte
12 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

It sounds a lot like a crank trying to establish the idea of Mu before the 19th Century. 

Not that respect for historiographic rigor ever kept phringers from adopting sus beliefs. 

—Jaylemurph 

I've only ever seen it spelled "Moo" from that era.

The use of "Moo" would have provided some confirmation that the source was from then as far as I know.

Maybe a misspelling/typo?

Surely no such ignoramus would think to purposefully alter their spelling of the word "Moo" just so no one could invalidate their source.

Harte

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShadowSot

No, I asked. Genuinely meant mou. 

 Naturally can't point to any direct sources. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hanslune
Posted (edited)

Unrelated to Mou

PDF of a very fine book on bronze age ships and seamanship. Some work I did with others on Cypus (dealing with ship anchors) was incorporated into it. Recommended if you are interested in sea related archaeology of the Bronze age.

https://www.academia.edu/4595129/Seagoing_Ships_and_Seamanship_in_the_Bronze_Age_Levant?email_work_card=view-paper

Edited by Hanslune
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Piney
1 hour ago, Tatetopa said:

Any supporting papers for this article?

It's not surprising. Obsidian was found in New Jersey dating from the Archaic. (Herbert Kraft) Powhatans described the Rockies to John Smith. 

I found some small pieces on 2 sites but the context was lost being in the plow zone. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hanslune
8 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

Any supporting papers for this article?

https://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/obsidian-oregan-0015400?fbclid=IwAR1_LAbMvhQa77bDIJ0EBBSTvbYHlSE8d9Q-J-bRWpbhHbV_o6pjOmPRE-g

UPDATED 3 JUNE, 2021 - 14:54 NATHAN FALDE

Obsidian From Oregon Found at Early Holocene Site Beneath Lake Huron

Thanks very interesting!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tatetopa
8 hours ago, Piney said:

It's not surprising. Obsidian was found in New Jersey dating from the Archaic. (Herbert Kraft) Powhatans described the Rockies to John Smith. 

There are some big beautiful glass flows around the Cascade cones.  Walking with a sharp eyed friend in Eastern Oregon, we have found a lot of small flakes, they seem to be common if you have the eye.   If not for him, I would have missed most of them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hanslune
3 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

There are some big beautiful glass flows around the Cascade cones.  Walking with a sharp eyed friend in Eastern Oregon, we have found a lot of small flakes, they seem to be common if you have the eye.   If not for him, I would have missed most of them.

Yes, I got quite good at finding stone tool 'spoor' at sites, that and seeing pottery sherds.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tatetopa
1 minute ago, Hanslune said:

Yes, I got quite good at finding stone tool 'spoor' at sites, that and seeing pottery sherds.

You should make me walk in back with the pack then and not in front where I might  trample specimens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.