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kmt_sesh

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17 hours ago, Wepwawet said:

Of course the Romans saw a difference between a theatre for plays and an amphitheatre for the games, or a circus/hippdrome for chariot racing and games. We see a difference between a football stadium and a movie theatre, and the difference between that and a theatre for plays, and a circus for that matter, but they are all for entertainment, which was the point I was making.

Yes, they had a variety of public entertainments: readings of poetic or philosophical texts; theatrical representations, with mimes and actors; concerts; foot race competitions between young teenagers; horse races; chariot races; gladiator jousts; hunts of exotic beasts; naval struggles.

Each of those spectacles imposed different constraints on the architecture of the sites used to host them, no wonder. There were wooden structures, but what strikes us are the stone and marble constructions that dotted the Urbs and many cities in their civilization.

What stupefies me most are the naumachias: they were engineering feats that really represented the power of the empire.  Not dismissing the importation of elephants, giraffes, etc. from central Africa...

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3 hours ago, Abramelin said:

Adding some info from the Italian wiki,

https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_d%27Accoddi

Besides the altar [the "ziggurat"], in the area of the archaeological complex there are other monumental pre-nuragic artefacts.

On the eastern side of the ramp is a large slab of compact limestone of 8.2 tons of circa 3 m per 3 m that was either a dolmen or a table for offers. This last hypothesis is confirmed by the presence of holes on the stone edges that were used to tie the beasts to be offered as victims.

[...]

two large limestone spheroid stones; the bigger weights more than a ton and has a circumference of 4.85 m.

158189675_1080px-Sassari_-_Complesso_prenuragico_di_Monte_dAccoddi_(27).JPG.9312de2997ec1c237926c564c0953621.JPG

[...]

There is finally a hypothesis, formulated by Eugenio Muroni, that contends that the symmetry of the pre-nuragic altar would reproduce the stars of the Southern Crux, which is not visible today from the site, because of the precession of equinoxes, but  was probably visible from the site 5000 years ago. [...]

 

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4 hours ago, Abramelin said:

And what about Sardinia?

....Wikipedia and a travel blog website cited by Wikipedia. 

How about give this a try: The Prehistoric Altar of Monte D'Accoddi, Ercole Contu (one of the actual excavators of the site). Not only does it talk about this site but among other things also the nearby subterranean rock cut necropolis as well as others in the area. Superb.   

 

Edited by Thanos5150
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37 minutes ago, Thanos5150 said:

....Wikipedia and a travel blog website cited by Wikipedia. 

How about give this a try: The Prehistoric Altar of Monte D'Accoddi, Ercole Contu (one of the actual excavators of the site). Not only does it talk about this site but among other things also the nearby subterranean rock cut necropolis as well as others in the area. Superb.   

 

:tu:

Ancient Sardinia is worth a thread on itself.

I have been reading about ancient Sardinia for years now.

Btw., on the Historum site there was someone who started a thread about Sardinia, and crammed lots of info in it. I think I have saved the link somewhere.

Edited to add link:

https://historum.com/threads/the-nuragic-civilization.139243/

Alas, lots of the pics posted are no longer available.

Edited by Abramelin
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6 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

[...] Sardinia is worth a thread on itself.

And a stroll as well! Go there!

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2 hours ago, Ianus said:

Adding some info from the Italian wiki,

https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_d%27Accoddi

Besides the altar [the "ziggurat"], in the area of the archaeological complex there are other monumental pre-nuragic artefacts.

On the eastern side of the ramp is a large slab of compact limestone of 8.2 tons of circa 3 m per 3 m that was either a dolmen or a table for offers. This last hypothesis is confirmed by the presence of holes on the stone edges that were used to tie the beasts to be offered as victims.

[...]

two large limestone spheroid stones; the bigger weights more than a ton and has a circumference of 4.85 m.

158189675_1080px-Sassari_-_Complesso_prenuragico_di_Monte_dAccoddi_(27).JPG.9312de2997ec1c237926c564c0953621.JPG

[...]

There is finally a hypothesis, formulated by Eugenio Muroni, that contends that the symmetry of the pre-nuragic altar would reproduce the stars of the Southern Crux, which is not visible today from the site, because of the precession of equinoxes, but  was probably visible from the site 5000 years ago. [...]

 

I've read that today, but in English.

Nevertheless, great info!

Edited by Abramelin
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48 minutes ago, Ianus said:

And a stroll as well! Go there!

Well Janus, you appear to be the Italian here, so why don't you start a thread about ancient Sardinia?

You are the one able to read, understand and translate Italian/Sardinian sites.

Btw., more than a decade ago (maybe two) I collected lots of info from traveling agencies about Sardinia. I never went, though.

Edit:

Yes, your username is 'Ianus'. But I know it means 'Janus', the 2-faced Roman god.

When I read 'Ianus', I read something else, heh.

Edited by Abramelin
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22 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

it’s of little consequence to suggest an amphitheater is just two theaters back to back.

Lol, shouldn't that be 'front to front'?

Or else you'll get a structure shaped somewhat like an X.

Yep, I am a nitpicker.

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9 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

Lol, shouldn't that be 'front to front'?

Or else you'll get a structure shaped somewhat like an X.

Yep, I am a nitpicker.

Well, I was never the one forwarding this suggestion, but you’re quite right.

I’m still working out how the Greeks were smashing together structures with arcs greater than 180°, but apparently Wepawet’s reading is just not to be questioned! One wonders just what will happen when he reads about Odeons. If, that is, he ever does…

—Jaylemurph

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1 hour ago, Abramelin said:

Well Janus, you appear to be the Italian here, so why don't you start a thread about ancient Sardinia?

You are the one able to read, understand and translate Italian/Sardinian sites.

Btw., more than a decade ago (maybe two) I collected lots of info from traveling agencies about Sardinia. I never went, though.

Er... It is a good idea, or challenge.  Sardinia holds some Unexplained Mysteries of the Mediterranean: from its colonization by --who?  to its role in the "sea people" invasions of the south-eastern Mediterranean in the second millennia BC, to its unique stone structures.  Even its present-day culture is as much Italian as not.  Its language is not an Italian dialect, it is accounted for a language on its own.

I went once, wonderful places; and hike around as you please: there are no vipers, not a single one!

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1 hour ago, Abramelin said:

When I read 'Ianus', I read something else, heh.

Gosh, I should have thought twice... Didn't realize that.  I am doomed.

I once read there is a profession which consists in finding names for products of world-wide companies that do not sound offensive in any language of the world.

(Latin did not have a 'j' letter ---well, not a 'u' either: my nickname should really be 'ianvs')

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50 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

Lol, shouldn't that be 'front to front'?

Or else you'll get a structure shaped somewhat like an X.

Yep, I am a nitpicker.

The back of the theatre is the scenae frons, remove that, and the stage, and put them together, back to back, and you get either a circular or elliptical amphitheatre. It's not my explanation of this, it's what I've been taught and what I have read over the years.

Edited by Wepwawet
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8 minutes ago, Wepwawet said:

The back of the theatre is the scenae frons, remove that, and the stage, and put them together, back to back, and you get either a circular or elliptical amphitheatre.

This is a rather unexpected elliptical one.  I say unexpected because when you park your car outside the city of Lucca, and start to stroll around in its little streets, you are quite astounded when you pop out of an arched passage into what you think is a plaza ---but no, wait, it's an amphitheatre!

Piazza-Anfiteatro-oggi.jpg.a7b7ac35824b8b0af45839a43b956789.jpg

They built houses over it, reused the materials, but respected the shape!

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Jesus, I am watching football!

But ok.

The front is where the audience is. That's the inside of the 'C'.

Put 2 of these C's together, and you'll get a circle.

Sayonara.

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27 minutes ago, Ianus said:

Gosh, I should have thought twice... Didn't realize that.  I am doomed.

I once read there is a profession which consists in finding names for products of world-wide companies that do not sound offensive in any language of the world.

(Latin did not have a 'j' letter ---well, not a 'u' either: my nickname should really be 'ianvs')

The Greeks, from whom the Romans learned the script, had a 'j'.

But dropped it soon after they learned it from the Phoenicians.

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35 minutes ago, Ianus said:

This is a rather unexpected elliptical one.  I say unexpected because when you park your car outside the city of Lucca, and start to stroll around in its little streets, you are quite astounded when you pop out of an arched passage into what you think is a plaza ---but no, wait, it's an amphitheatre!

Piazza-Anfiteatro-oggi.jpg.a7b7ac35824b8b0af45839a43b956789.jpg

They built houses over it, reused the materials, but respected the shape!

As the Piazza Navona preserves the form of the Stadium of Domitian, and some of it's fabric. One of the attractions of Rome is walking about looking at what remains of ancient buildings incorporated in post classical buildings.

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1 hour ago, jaylemurph said:

One wonders just what will happen when he reads about Odeons. If, that is, he ever does…

Don't have to read about them as I am very familiar with Odeons, and I know that they were transformed not into amthitheatres, but bingo halls.

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3 minutes ago, Wepwawet said:

One of the attractions of Rome is walking about looking at what remains of ancient buildings incorporated in post classical buildings.

Well... I should not talk about Rome: I could get Stendhal's syndrome just by thinking of that city ^_^

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8 minutes ago, Ianus said:

Well... I should not talk about Rome: I could get Stendhal's syndrome just by thinking of that city ^_^

You know you forced half of UM to start googling, right?

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9 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

You know you forced half of UM to start googling, right?

Oops! I'll have to correct my concision.

I really don't know where this story comes from, but we are told that the French romanticism writer Stendhal got sick (fainting?) during his voyage in Italy by looking at artistic manufacts ---I don't even know whether they were paintings or archaeological sites in Rome. We call "Stendhal syndrome" an awe that gets at you when confronted with such beauty.

Edited by Ianus
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1 hour ago, Wepwawet said:

Don't have to read about them as I am very familiar with Odeons, and I know that they were transformed not into amthitheatres, but bingo halls.

I quite forgot: an expert on one thing is the expert on all things. 

We’re all quite lucky to have such a Renaissance man amongst us. You should just write my next book review for me. 

—Jaylemurph 

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4 hours ago, Ianus said:

Gosh, I should have thought twice... Didn't realize that.  I am doomed.

I once read there is a profession which consists in finding names for products of world-wide companies that do not sound offensive in any language of the world.

(Latin did not have a 'j' letter ---well, not a 'u' either: my nickname should really be 'ianvs')

I was wondering about that. So when we speak to you directly should we refer to you as "Uanus"? 

Edited by Thanos5150
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