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kmt_sesh

Let's talk history

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Hanslune
1 hour ago, jaylemurph said:

So what you’re really saying here is that those Dendera light bulbs are detached elephant trunks, right?

—Jaylemurph

Only if you stick the trunk into a 120 receptacle and since everyone knows that the ancient Egyptians were into 240 volt outlets - that wasn't going to happen.

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jaylemurph
43 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

Only if you stick the trunk into a 120 receptacle and since everyone knows that the ancient Egyptians were into 240 volt outlets - that wasn't going to happen.

Ohhhh. 

So now you’re saying trunk flambé was an ancient Egyptian delicacy. 

—Jaylemurph 

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Harte

Just so we're all on the same page - "Dendera" is Ancient Egyptian for "light bulb."

Harte

 

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Harte

The reason the elephant looks so gaunt - the AEs kept their elephants on a special diet for a month before they slaughtered them for flambe.

They fed them nothing but slave farts.

Harte

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jaylemurph
Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, Harte said:

What's that elephant doing to that poor man?

Harte

Trust me, you don’t hug it like that if you’re having a bad time. 

—Jaylemurph 

EDIT: At least one Republican understands what consent means!

Edited by jaylemurph
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Harte
30 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

Trust me, you don’t hug it like that if you’re having a bad time. 

—Jaylemurph 

EDIT: At least one Republican understands what consent means!

Ahem... Bill Clinton.

Ahem... Andrew Cuomo.

Harte

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Sir Wearer of Hats
1 hour ago, Harte said:

Ahem... Bill Clinton.

Ahem... Andrew Cuomo.

Harte

They’re Democrats.

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Harte
1 hour ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

They’re Democrats.

My point. Get yer own point.

Harte

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Sir Wearer of Hats
4 hours ago, Harte said:

My point. Get yer own point.

Harte

I’m Australian. Anything not nailed down is fair game.

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Thanos5150

Ancient Egyptians Collected Fossils

Quote

 

Ancient Egyptian worshippers of Set, god of darkness and chaos, collected fossils of extinct beasts by the thousands. From 1300 and 1200 BC, nearly three tons of heavy, black fossils, polished by river sands, were brought to Set shrines on the Nile. Many of the bones were wrapped in linen and placed in rock‑cut tombs.

The immense troves of fossils heaped at Qau el-Kebir and Matmar were discovered in 1922-24 by archaeologists Guy Brunton and Sir Flinders Petrie, stunning evidence that Egyptians revered large stone bones as sacred relics of Set....

 

 

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jaylemurph
5 hours ago, Thanos5150 said:

They revered large bones? Between this and Stampy up there, AE sounds like one fabulous polity. 

—Jaylemurph

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Hanslune
Posted (edited)

https://www.academia.edu/35674242/The_tombs_of_Kaisebi_AS_76_and_Ptahwer_AS76b_at_Abusir_South_by_Dulíková_V_Jirásková_L_Vymazalová_H_Arias_Kytnarová_K_Havelková_P_?email_work_card=view-paper

 

Quote


The tombs of Kaisebi (AS 76) and Ptahwer (AS 76b)
at Abusir South

Quote

Discussion
The two tombs, AS 76 and AS 76b, are architecturally closely connected. Their architecture and position raises many questions about their owners and their relationship. Kaisebi’s original mastaba stretched over an area of 89.25 m2. Other holders of the title cmcw hAyt (n) zAb buried at Abusir during the Fifth Dynasty built larger tombs: Kaaper Junior (AS 61) 119.49 m2 and Neferinpu (AS 37) 169.10 m2 (Bárta et al. 2014). Observing the satellite image, we can surmise that Kaisebi, respecting older structures, was limited on space for the construction of his tomb. The mastaba of Kaisebi was rather small in size, and also the burial shafts can be considered unequivalent to the decorated chapel with a beautiful false door, which by itself seems to correspond with the status of the tomb owner. Similar tombs from the latter part of the Fifth Dynasty usually have the main burial shaft descending to a more or less spacious burial chamber. Contrarily, Shafts 1 and 4 were very shallow and modest, with no chambers at their ends, and there was no burial equipment at all. The burial apartments dated to the same time as Kaisebi’s and belonging to owners with a similar status usually contained canopic jars, sets of model vessels, sets of model copper instruments and ceramic beer jars or wine amphorae and bowls (e.g. Shaft 1 in the mastaba of Neferinpu (AS 37), Bárta et al. 2014). Due to this discrepancy, there was another attempt to find the main burial place, the chamber of Kaisebi. The only available place was between the chapel and Shaft 1, but no traces of another shaft opening were detected. Shaft 4, which seems to be unfinished, shall be excluded. Only Shaft 1 is left to consider, but there is a probability that the bones collected there belonged to  a female, perhaps to the wife of the tomb owner. The false door mentions only Kaisebi, and a male wooden statue was originally placed in the serdab. It is highly improbable that he was buried elsewhere. Moreover, the northern
niche situated in the corridor of AS 76 was probably the offering place of Shaft 1, and the chapel should have had its own burial chamber situated below its floor, accessible through a shaft to the north of it

 

Edited by Hanslune
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Hanslune

yADpSvj.jpg

Okay, I just like the image. Gives one the idea of a traveler on the road of history.

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Abramelin
On 8/7/2021 at 12:11 AM, Harte said:

What's that elephant doing to that poor man?

Harte

Doing what comes natural to them:

 

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Hanslune

https://www.academia.edu/50912832/Khafres_Temples_Giza_Part_I_The_Pyramid_Temple_A_Laymans_Guide?email_work_card=view-paper

 

Quote

Khafre’s Temples, Giza: Part I

 

The Pyramid Temple :

 A Layman‟s Guide

3-14efdd47bf.jpg

8-505f9f35c4.jpg

6-e1ffcf765e.jpg

 

Quote

Concluding remarks

 

Without doubt, Khafre’s pyramid temple is a scene of utter destruction, and any

attempt to reconstruct it is fraught with difficulty. We are very fortunate that

Hӧlscher was tasked with excavating the temple, as excavators at this time could range from very poor to ahead of their time;

 

Hӧlscher would be at the upper end of this scale. Whilst he managed to publish some findings on the pyramid and valley temple, the same could not be said about the sphinx temple which was discovered and excavated some 15 years later and yet the excavators did not publish anything. It would be nice to see a more modern investigation of the temples, as techniques and technology have advanced in over a century and much more may be discovered

C

 

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Hanslune

An interesting tid bit about 'air shafts' in Khafre's tomb

Quote

The Air-Channels of Chephren's Pyramid by I E S Edwards

http://www.gizapyramids.org/static/pdf library/edwards_fs_dunham.pdf

An interest bit of pyramid trivia/history

Quote

When the Second Pyramid was planned its architect obviously intended to
equip it with similar channels to those of the Great Pyramid, but work on their
construction came to an abrupt end, though, it has already been maintained, no
practical difficulties prevented their completion. The reason, however, is not far to
seek: the burial-chamber was mainly below ground and the approach to it was by a
corridor sloping downwards from the entrance and running horizontal!)' to the
chamber. The purpose of the northern channel was therefore covered by the corri­
dor: a channel from the northern wall of the chamber would have been merely a
functional duplicate and consequently superfluous. Egyptian funerary architecture
is certainly not without examples of the retention of earlier elements after they had
lost their original utility, the reproduction of the pre-dynastic grave-tumulus in the
body of the early dynastic brick mastabas at Saqqara being perhaps the clearest
example, but they did not duplicate the functions of other elements and, moreover,
they were long-established, whereas the channels from the burial-chamber were
recent innovations intended to meet exceptional circumstances in the Great Pyra­
mid which did not exist in the Second Pyramid. The abandonment of the plan did,
however, involve the loss of a special way of approach to the southern stars, the
absence of which in the earlier pyramids suggests that its inclusion in the Great
Pyramid was less essential than that of the northern channel. Its function must pre­
viously have been performed by some, as yet, unknown means to which resort was
again made when the plan of the Second Pyramid was changed. It may not be far
from the truth to suppose that it was this prospective loss which led the architect to
reproduce the channels when he first planned the burial-chamber of the Second
Pyramid.

 

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Saru

Thread split based on last couple of pages

 

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ShadowSot

OK, I have to admit. I'm familiar with ancient stone drilling and cutting. I've got a couple of books on it. 

 But I have a bit of trouble actually understanding them. 

 Which is a problem as the ancient drilling lost technology stuff has been gaining traction again. 

 Now I'm familiar with the various videos online, but are there any decent blogs or write ups in response to people like Dunn that break it down for say, an over worked dude with ADD to understand? 

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ShadowSot

Unrelated to the above, want to recommend a decent history audio book :

 The Ark Before Noah by Irving Finkle, read by the same. 

 

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Oniomancer
20 hours ago, ShadowSot said:

OK, I have to admit. I'm familiar with ancient stone drilling and cutting. I've got a couple of books on it. 

 But I have a bit of trouble actually understanding them. 

 Which is a problem as the ancient drilling lost technology stuff has been gaining traction again. 

 Now I'm familiar with the various videos online, but are there any decent blogs or write ups in response to people like Dunn that break it down for say, an over worked dude with ADD to understand? 

There's couple of Russian guys with a series of videos on youtube who've done a good job replicating Stocks' results and even improving on them IMO:

There's also some experimental work on how the Mycenaean's may have cut stone that I think puts the kibosh on the giant circular saw idea:

 

Edited by Oniomancer
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ShadowSot
6 hours ago, Oniomancer said:

There's couple of Russian guys with a series of videos on youtube who've done a good job replicating Stocks' results and even improving on them IMO:

There's also some experimental work on how the Mycenaean's may have cut stone that I think puts the kibosh on the giant circular saw idea:

 

Cheers, but I'm subscribed to those. Was hoping for a more detailed write up. 

 

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ShadowSot

https://publications.dainst.org/journals/index.php/efb/article/view/2596

 Göbekli Tepe, Turkey. A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)

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e-FB_Logo.png
 
2020-2
 
Istanbul Department
Göbekli Tepe, Turkey
A brief summary of research at a new World Heritage Site (2015–2019)
 
 
1Upper Mesopotamia, which today includes modern-day southeastern Turkey, northern Syria and northern parts of Iraq, was one of several core zones which saw the emergence of Neolithic lifeways in the tenth and ninth millennia calBC. It was from these core areas that subsequent centuries saw the gradual dissemination of the Neolithic into adjacent parts of Anatolia, the Middle East and beyond. Today, the tell site of Göbekli Tepe, located some 90 kilometres east of the Euphrates in Şanlıurfa province, is a key archaeological site for studying the manifold processes in the run-up to plant and animal domestication and the emergence of the Neolithic in this region.
 
2Soon after the initiation of excavations in 1995, Göbekli Tepe soon found itself interpreted as a purely ritual site, a conclusion based on three main observations: 1) the presence of »special buildings« with elaborately carved monolithic T-shaped pillars; 2) the absence of domestic structures; and 3) its lack of reliable water sources. More remarkable still was the realization that Göbekli Tepe produced no evidence for domesticated plants and animal species; in other words, the communities responsible for the construction of the special buildings were still living as hunters and foragers.
 
3The interpretation of Göbekli Tepe as a mountaintop sanctuary that was constructed by huntergatherers soon prompted a fitting narrative. At ritually significant times in their calendar, it was argued, different groups living in its catchment congregated at this natural landmark to construct the special buildings. Further, the efforts deemed necessary for construction, including the freeing-up of labour and the supply of victuals to the hungry workforce, would have presented huntergatherer economies with unprecedented challenges which, it was postulated, could only be met by the advantages afforded by plant and animal domestication. Subsequently, religious zeal was catapulted to the fore as a serious contender among the potential triggers for Neolithisation (domestication), an idea that was ground-breaking at the time because it contradicted earlier notions that (organized) religion only emerged much later in economically and socially »more advanced« societies.
 
4Meanwhile, the construction narrative of the special buildings at Göbekli Tepe as a series of religiously-motivated events has featured in innumerable publications by members of the research team. Therefore, it was the archaeologists themselves who delivered and subsequently cultivated the now popular opinion that Göbekli Tepe is the site of the »World’s First Temples«. Remarkably, in the last three years, attempts made by the media to reinforce this hypothesis have even included references to Göbekli Tepe as the »Zero Point in Time«. This paradigm will doubtlessly prove difficult to dispel, especially given its prominence in current marketing strategies around the UNESCO World Heritage Site. However, this is the situation in which we currently find ourselves: New insights from several deep-soundings excavated in the reporting period for the anchor points of the two recently constructed protective shelters have exposed the weaknesses of the temple-narrative, meaning that a revision of the popular scientific view is now unavoidable (Fig. 1). Specifically, the latest observations relate to the existence of domestic buildings and the harvesting and distribution of rainwater at Göbekli Tepe. Additionally, through an increased emphasis on building archaeology studies, more details pertaining to the functions and biographies of the different buildings are emerging.
 
Domestic contexts
5A deep-sounding excavated in 2015 and 2016 straddling the trenches K10-13 and K10-23 in the northwestern part of the site revealed, among other features, a series of round-oval structures in an agglutinative arrangement and a slightly larger, multi-phase round-oval building (Fig. 1: A. Fig. 2). These buildings, which had been constructed upon or just above the natural limestone bedrock, bordered a small activity area that produced a sequence of hearths and evidence for stone and bone bead production with unusually high frequencies of bone tools. Although 14C (AMS) ages are not yet available, building archaeological and stratigraphic considerations in combination with the recovered flint tool assemblage suggest that they belong to an early occupation phase at Göbekli Tepe, most likely coinciding with the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA ~9.500–8.700 calBC).

 

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onlookerofmayhem

Here's a massive gallery of stone cutting, working and transport from the early to mid 1900s :

Site is in French, but most of the photos speak for themselves. PS - Google Translate works well enough for the titles.

http://www.pierres-info.fr/cartes_postales_1/index.html

carriere_terce_normandoux.jpg

Serge_Mercouroff_tolstoi.jpg

carrieres3.jpg

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