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"That's very interesting, Steve"


acute

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8 minutes ago, Matt221 said:

The woolly mammoth was still around when the pyramids were being built.

They must have been sweating with those big coats on.

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1 hour ago, acute said:

 

I hope Steve finds this doubly interesting! :w00t:

Obviously what I ment to post was 

Square root 2 (or 1.41...) - … is also called Pythagoras' constant. Paper sizes (A4, A3 etc.) are all based on a single aspect ratio of the square root of two.

You can see how easy  it was to get the two mixed up

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I've deicded to introduce a new feature, of some selected stories from the local paper. All of these are true, and they are all, I can assure you, In teresting. Today:

Work ordered at 'uneven' car park;

'Penny pinching' move to take away our deckchairs - and consultation is all online;

Police investigating alleged attack with baseball bat ^_^

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There isn't actually room in the House of Commons for every single sitting MP. There's usually only about a dozen that can be bothered to turn up at any one time, but on the occasions when they are all supposed to be present, such as the State Opening of Parliament or the Brexit Vote Debate, there isn't room for them all on those green leather benches and some have to stand at the back or lounge in the aisles like backpackers at Gatwick Airport when all flights are delayed because British Airways' computers have gone down again. 

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* Another interesting Parliamentary fact: until the 1930s, there was only one lavatory in the entire building. This was one major reason why female MPs were frowned upon for so long.

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In the White House, there are 13,092 knives, forks and spoons

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28 minutes ago, Matt221 said:

In the White House, there are 13,092 knives, forks and spoons

That was probably before Mr,. Trump moved in. I bet some have migrated to Trump Tower by now ... :<_<

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5 hours ago, Matt221 said:

In the White House, there are 13,092 knives, forks and spoons

Wow there sure are a lot of tools in the White House. 

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A pipe organ was the loudest sound that could be made in the year 1600.

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3 hours ago, Matt221 said:

A pipe organ was the loudest sound that could be made in the year 1600.

What about someone who had a pipe organ dropped on their feet ?

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In the last 4000 years, no new animals have been domesticated

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The well-known nickname of the much-loved former Prime Minister, Margaret H. Thatcher, "the Iron lady", was in fact originally coined, in a semi-admiring kind of way, by the Soviet Army newspaper, The Red Star, before she became Prime Minister. 

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The horse has 205 bones (54 vertebral column, 36 ribs, 1 sternum, 34 skull, 40 front legs, 40 hindlegs). The number of tail coccygeal vertebrae is usually 18 but can also vary.

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More parliament trivia.......

palace_westminster_w.jpg

 

 

The Central Tower of The Palace of Westminster is a folly.

170px-Central_Tower,_Palace_of_Westminst

It is basically a huge chimney.
It was added to improve ventilation following the Great Stink of 1858, and failed.

(As you probably guessed..... That's a Great Stink link! ^ )

Edited by acute
.
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It is basically a huge chimney.
It was added to improve ventilation following the Great Stink of 1858, and failed.

well, huge quantities of noxious gases have been produced there ever since, so I should think it's proved its worth. :-/ 

 

48 minutes ago, acute said:

Westminster is a folly.

i think you could cut that down to. :-/ 

Edited by Manfred von Dreidecker
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The Victorians were very keen that everyone visiting Parliament should receive a history lesson. Artists were hired to decorate the rooms with suitably elevated historical scenes. One or two made mistakes. In the ‘Princes Chamber’ (ante room to the Lords) there are portraits of members of the Tudor family and their spouses. Anne Boleyn, who was slim and dark haired, appears as a buxom blonde – actually Anne of Hungary. Catherine Parr’s head was replaced with that of teenager Lady Jane Grey. Lady Jane Grey herself had to make do with the ‘head of an unidentified Flemish lady’

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Contrary to popular belief, the delete key on a computer keyboard deletes the character in front of the cursor.

The key that deletes the previous character is the backspace key.

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19 hours ago, acute said:

Contrary to popular belief, the delete key on a computer keyboard deletes the character in front of the cursor.

The key that deletes the previous character is the backspace key.

I've never noticed that before, probably because I've never used the delete ke .

Oh yes, that might be fun to try. I'll try it today and let you know if it is, in fact, fun. 

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Colchester is the oldest recorded city in the UK.  It was the capital of Roman Britain from AD43, until it was destroyed in Boudica's rebellion of AD61, after which the capital was moved to Londinium.

Colchester's celtic name of Camulodunon is thought to be the inspirational for the legend of King Arthur's Camelot.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, acute said:

Colchester is the oldest recorded city in the UK.  It was the capital of Roman Britain from AD43, until it was destroyed in Boudica's rebellion of AD61, after which the capital was moved to Londinium.

Colchester's celtic name of Camulodunon is thought to be the inspirational for the legend of King Arthur's Camelot.

 

 

Also someone nicked the koi out of the pond and I got bitten by a squirrel in the lower castle park ....... just a couple of random facts 

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3 hours ago, acute said:

Colchester is the oldest recorded city in the UK.  It was the capital of Roman Britain from AD43, until it was destroyed in Boudica's rebellion of AD61, after which the capital was moved to Londinium.

Colchester's celtic name of Camulodunon is thought to be the inspiration for the legend of King Arthur's Camelot.

Oops!

*fixed*

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The Oldest Hot Cross Bun in the world was baked in Wyre Street, Colchester, on Good Friday 1807 and is now rock hard. Owned by a couple in Wormingford, it beats one kept in the British Museum, baked in 1869

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