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Burial chamber of a 'Pharaoh's daughter'

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Burial chamber of a 'Pharaoh's daughter' dating back 3,700 years is found in Egypt alongside jars filled with her ORGANS

    Burial chamber contains a box engraved with 'protective' hieroglyphics
    Jars in the box were filled with the remains of a 3,700-year-old King's daughter
    The royal burial chamber was found attached to a recently discovered pyramid
    The pyramid housed newly identified King Emnikamaw of Egypt's 13th Dynasty


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4493270/Egypt-says-burial-chamber-dating-3-700-years.html#ixzz4gls7lBrN


 

 

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Princess Serenity

Cool. You never hear about a rulers child?

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kmt_sesh

A good find, seeder. I'd read about the new pyramid some time ago but didn't know they had found a name. Emnikamaw is a strange name and not likely Egyptian, but Dynasty 13 was a time of political fragmentation. It's quite possible he was a foreigner who reined over a limited area in his time. It's always interesting when a new king is found in the historical record.

The article is clearly mistaken about one thing. It says this ruined pyramid may have been the first time the Egyptians attempted to build a smooth-sided pyramid. The ruins date to about 1700 BCE, so shortly before the New Kingdom. But the first smooth-sided pyramid was erected by Sneferu around 2580 BCE, in the Old Kingdom. That's over 800 years before Emnikamaw.

The canopic box is interesting. Unfortunately, as well-preserved as it seems to be, the hieroglyphs are badly faded (at least in the photos). I was hoping to see if I could make out a name for the royal daughter.

Seeder, please head over to Egypt and take detailed, high-resolution photos of the canopic box so I can see the hieroglyphs. And get some of Emnikamaw's capstone, too. Some nice hieroglyphs on there.

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kmt_sesh
2 hours ago, Princess Serenity said:

Cool. You never hear about a rulers child?

Sometimes you do, especially with particularly powerful kings like Ramesses II. But often you know little to nothing.

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Kenemet
On 5/11/2017 at 0:57 PM, kmt_sesh said:

A good find, seeder. I'd read about the new pyramid some time ago but didn't know they had found a name. Emnikamaw is a strange name and not likely Egyptian, but Dynasty 13 was a time of political fragmentation. It's quite possible he was a foreigner who reined over a limited area in his time. It's always interesting when a new king is found in the historical record.

The article is clearly mistaken about one thing. It says this ruined pyramid may have been the first time the Egyptians attempted to build a smooth-sided pyramid. The ruins date to about 1700 BCE, so shortly before the New Kingdom. But the first smooth-sided pyramid was erected by Sneferu around 2580 BCE, in the Old Kingdom. That's over 800 years before Emnikamaw.

The canopic box is interesting. Unfortunately, as well-preserved as it seems to be, the hieroglyphs are badly faded (at least in the photos). I was hoping to see if I could make out a name for the royal daughter.

Seeder, please head over to Egypt and take detailed, high-resolution photos of the canopic box so I can see the hieroglyphs. And get some of Emnikamaw's capstone, too. Some nice hieroglyphs on there.

The article is apparently mistaken in a number of other things, including the pharaoh's name.  He's actually called Ameny Qemau and his daughter is Hatshepsut (not THE Hatshepsut, of course; another one.)

A better article is here: http://www.livescience.com/59066-burial-chamber-of-princess-in-egypt-pyramid.html

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Tatetopa
On 5/11/2017 at 10:57 AM, kmt_sesh said:

A good find, seeder. I'd read about the new pyramid some time ago but didn't know they had found a name. Emnikamaw is a strange name and not likely Egyptian, but Dynasty 13 was a time of political fragmentation. It's quite possible he was a foreigner who reined over a limited area in his time. It's always interesting when a new king is found in the historical record.

Are there a lot of blanks in the list of rulers?  In periods of strife or uncertainty might the kingdom fragment into smaller polities each ruled by a pharaoh until one emerged as the strongest.    Did it happen more than once?

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kmt_sesh
5 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

Are there a lot of blanks in the list of rulers?  In periods of strife or uncertainty might the kingdom fragment into smaller polities each ruled by a pharaoh until one emerged as the strongest.    Did it happen more than once?

Think Game of Thrones. Each of Egypt's three intermediate periods as well as swaths of the Late Period were a lot like the books and the TV show which came from the books: the original kingdom broke into regional territories up ad dow the Nile Valley, and rival dynasties competed for supremacy.

Most of the kings from the major kingdoms—Old, Middle, and New—are well documented and understood. It's the intermediate periods in between and the LatePeriod after where we still have blanks. And every once in a while a king might be discovered about whom we knew nothing. This was the case several years back at the site of Abydos where a murky regional king named Senebkay was discovered. Rather than dwell on it here I wrote an article about Senebkay for my blog. That article can be found here.

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kmt_sesh
8 hours ago, Kenemet said:

The article is apparently mistaken in a number of other things, including the pharaoh's name.  He's actually called Ameny Qemau and his daughter is Hatshepsut (not THE Hatshepsut, of course; another one.)

A better article is here: http://www.livescience.com/59066-burial-chamber-of-princess-in-egypt-pyramid.html

That's very helpful. Thanks. Now I feel kind of silly. Where on earth did they come up with Emnikamaw? LOL Ouija board?

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Tatetopa
2 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

Think Game of Thrones. Each of Egypt's three intermediate periods as well as swaths of the Late Period were a lot like the books and the TV show which came from the books: the original kingdom broke into regional territories up ad dow the Nile Valley, and rival dynasties competed for supremacy.

Most of the kings from the major kingdoms—Old, Middle, and New—are well documented and understood. It's the intermediate periods in between and the LatePeriod after where we still have blanks. And every once in a while a king might be discovered about whom we knew nothing. This was the case several years back at the site of Abydos where a murky regional king named Senebkay was discovered. Rather than dwell on it here I wrote an article about Senebkay for my blog. That article can be found here.

I just read your blog!  That is awesome.  Thanks so much.  I hope  I don' t offend, but this makes Egypt seem even more interesting and approachable somehow.  I guess in my mind, Egypt was pretty cut and dried with  temples, gods, and divine right god-kings.  Lots of structure and only disturbances from outside forces.   I knew about the Hittites and the battle of Kadesh, but not much else.  I have caught a couple of BBC shows moderated by Bettany Hughes who claims to be a historian.  Do you know that program?   Any thought about accuracy.  I got on to it because we were talking about trading, obsidian and metal on the ask about history thread.  I thought the Minoans might be central distributors for the Med and surroundings. 

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Tatetopa

I read some more of your blog.  All I can say is that I salute you as an honorable and worthy scholar. Spreading knowledge is a service.  You would have been at home in the Library of Alexandria I think.

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kmt_sesh
17 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

I just read your blog!  That is awesome.  Thanks so much.  I hope  I don' t offend, but this makes Egypt seem even more interesting and approachable somehow.  I guess in my mind, Egypt was pretty cut and dried with  temples, gods, and divine right god-kings.  Lots of structure and only disturbances from outside forces.   I knew about the Hittites and the battle of Kadesh, but not much else.  I have caught a couple of BBC shows moderated by Bettany Hughes who claims to be a historian.  Do you know that program?   Any thought about accuracy.  I got on to it because we were talking about trading, obsidian and metal on the ask about history thread.  I thought the Minoans might be central distributors for the Med and surroundings. 

Nothing to take offense to. I usually find ancient history to be fascinating enough without the need for fictional embellishment. 

Like any part of ancient history, the Egyptian civilization was more complex and varied than it might seem on the surface. The major kingdom periods may have seen a stable and prosperous Egypt, but especially during the intermediate periods Egypt tended to be a muddled mess. A lot more research is still needed for those periods because there's still so much more to learn. The Hittites came along on the Egyptian scope later in the Bronze Age, and they never even sucessfully breached Egypt's primary borders (nor did the Egyptians breach theirs)—but they were the primary enemies of Egypt till late in the reign of Ramesses II, when the two sides signed the world's first known peace treaty. The first people who successfully encroached on Egypt, settled there en masse, and took over large swaths of it were the Hyksos (c.1700 BCE), a loose federation of Canaanites.

Not familiar with Hughes's show but it sounds interesting. The BBC, I've found, is pretty high quality and generally reliable.

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kmt_sesh
17 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

I read some more of your blog.  All I can say is that I salute you as an honorable and worthy scholar. Spreading knowledge is a service.  You would have been at home in the Library of Alexandria I think.

Wow, thanks so much! Those are indeed high words of praise. I'm glad you explored my blog.

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Peter Cox
On 5/15/2017 at 2:19 AM, kmt_sesh said:

Wow, thanks so much! Those are indeed high words of praise. I'm glad you explored my blog.

Well I gave it a read too and can attest to that it is AWESOME well done Sir.

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kmt_sesh
19 hours ago, Peter Cox said:

Well I gave it a read too and can attest to that it is AWESOME well done Sir.

Thanks so much, Peter! I'm glad you enjoyed my blog.

As it happens, I have a comment waiting for my approval for an article I wrote about circumcision in ancient Egypt. It's actually a fairly popular article, but this guy is fishing for advice on whether he should have his newborn son circumcised. LOL I get some weird comments. Like this one, I don't always approve them.

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Frank Merton

My view of circumcision -- it was very selfish of both Jehovah and Allah to demand it -- it reduces male pleasure in copulation a lot.

Of course in some cases the boy needs something done, but it doesn't have to be full circumcision.

I understand that men who are circumcised are less likely to get infected with AIDS than those who aren't after normal copulation -- I don't know -- I guess that makes some sense with all VDs since there is more membrane there for the virus to attack.  So, I guess these things have their pluses and minuses.  Still, if God had wanted us to be circumcised he would have made us born that way, wouldn't he?  Sounds sacrilegious.

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Peter Cox
On 5/17/2017 at 5:28 AM, kmt_sesh said:

Thanks so much, Peter! I'm glad you enjoyed my blog.

As it happens, I have a comment waiting for my approval for an article I wrote about circumcision in ancient Egypt. It's actually a fairly popular article, but this guy is fishing for advice on whether he should have his newborn son circumcised. LOL I get some weird comments. Like this one, I don't always approve them.

Well that is just madness - Tell him if his son was born +-5000 years ago you could comment however he was not so it is not your game of expertise lol..

There are a lot of odd folks out there.

Ill keep my eye on the blog really tip top information you have put up there.

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