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Waspie_Dwarf

Juno to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot

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Waspie_Dwarf

NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 10

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Just days after celebrating its first anniversary in Jupiter orbit, NASA's Juno spacecraft will fly directly over Jupiter's Great Red Spot, the gas giant's iconic, 10,000-mile-wide (16,000-kilometer-wide) storm. This will be humanity's first up-close and personal view of the gigantic feature -- a storm monitored since 1830 and possibly existing for more than 350 years. 

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Earth-based Views of Jupiter to Enhance Juno Flyby

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Telescopes in Hawaii have obtained new images of Jupiter and its Great Red Spot, which will assist the first-ever close-up study of the Great Red Spot, planned for July 10. On that date, NASA's Juno spacecraft will fly directly over the giant planet's most famous feature at an altitude of only about 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers).

Throughout the Juno mission, numerous observations of Jupiter by Earth-based telescopes have been acquired in coordination with the mission, to help Juno investigate the giant planet's atmosphere.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Astra.
1 hour ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Fly Over Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 10

 

It truly is mind boggling that this great raging storm is 16,000 km wide, and has continued to swirl for centuries. I can't wait to see what images Juno has in store for us.  

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Waspie_Dwarf

NASA's Juno Spacecraft Completes Flyby over Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

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NASA's Juno mission completed a close flyby of Jupiter and its Great Red Spot on July 10, during its sixth science orbit.

All of Juno's science instruments and the spacecraft's JunoCam were operating during the flyby, collecting data that are now being returned to Earth. Juno's next close flyby of Jupiter will occur on Sept. 1.

Raw images from the spacecraft’s latest flyby will be posted in coming days.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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toast

Jupiters surface design looks like a cooperation work by Claude Monet, Gustav Klimt and Joaquín Sorolla. Its of an inexpressible beauty.

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Claire.

Stunning Images Capture First Close-Up With Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

Today, NASA released the first photos from the Juno satellite's close encounter with the solar system's largest storm.

Read more: Smithsonian.com

Edited by Claire.
Fixed source url. Added description.
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Waspie_Dwarf

Close-up of Jupiter's Great Red Spot

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PIA21772_hires.jpg

This enhanced-color image of Jupiter's Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Jason Major using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft.

The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 07:10 p.m. PDT (10:10 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its 7th close flyby of Jupiter,

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA/JPL

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Jupiter's Great Red Spot Revealed

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PIA21395_hires.jpg

This enhanced-color image of Jupiter's Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Kevin Gill using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft.

The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 07:07 p.m. PDT (10:07 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its 7th close flyby of Jupiter.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA/JPL

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Jupiter's Great Red Spot (Enhanced Color)

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PIA21773_hires.jpg

This enhanced-color image of Jupiter's Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft.

The image is approximately illumination adjusted and strongly enhanced to draw viewers' eyes to the iconic storm and the turbulence around it.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA/JPL

 

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highdesert50

Stanley Kubrick brought us the fantasy and NASA the reality. Well done. Thanks for posting.

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Dyna

Still seems like very distant I would have thought it would be closer. That actually looks like a drawing.

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