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Claire.

Water bears could survive the apocalypse

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Claire.

Tardigrades are back in the news again.

A new study suggests that the little cuties could survive nearly all the way until the death of the sun—long after we're toast.

Tardigrades, which are usually less than a millimeter long (0.04 inches), are nearly indestructible, some of the most resilient forms of life on Earth. They can survive for up to 30 years without eating, and can be frozen, boiled, squished under intense pressure, and exposed to the vacuum and radiation of space without ill effect. The animal, which lives in water (and is also known as a "water bear," can survive for up to 60 years, according to a statement from the University of Oxford.

Source: Live Science

Also, for anyone who's interested, here are some general facts about them.

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keithisco

Imagine...an empty world except for the Water-Bears...imagine the Civilisations they would build "The Awful Tower", the "leaning Tower of Pupae", a "Caliphate of Crumbs" :rolleyes:

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fred_mc

Wonder if we could alter their DNA, perhaps add DNA with encoded information about us humans so that some future space-traveling civilization could read the message about that once we existed.

Edited by fred_mc
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The Russian Hare

Planet of the Tardigrades?

*Falls to knees*

"You Maniacs! You blew it all up!"

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Orphalesion

Water bears.

The more I look at them the less I can't decide:

If they were the size of, let's say a pug, I don't know whether I would find them cute or absolutely horrifying. On one hand they have those silly leggies and chubby frames, on the other hand they have those freaky trunk-like mouth parts and (very) vaguely insect/isopod appearance...  It might depend on their demeanor and what they would feel like if you tried to touch them.

Of course I understand they wouldn't work if they were larger, but for some reason the idea of a decently sized pet tardigrade has always intrigued me...

 

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Nzo

We will find a way to kill them, have no doubt! We already killed 50% of the worlds species... its just going to take a little while longer for them.

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RoofGardener
6 minutes ago, Nzo said:

We already killed 50% of the worlds species......

No, we havn't. 

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The Russian Hare
Quote

If they were the size of, let's say a pug, I don't know whether I would find them cute or absolutely horrifying.

I for one think they look sweet :wub:

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Parsec
6 hours ago, fred_mc said:

Wonder if we could alter their DNA, perhaps add DNA with encoded information about us humans so that some future space-traveling civilization could read the message about that once we existed.

For a moment I thought you meant to mix human and water bear DNA!

Spiderman's next foe? 

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The_V_Spirit

What doesn't kill you makes you stronger i guess!

Also, they look chubby and cute as hell :D

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eugenonegin
On ‎14‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 9:46 PM, Claire. said:

Tardigrades are back in the news again.

A new study suggests that the little cuties could survive nearly all the way until the death of the sun—long after we're toast.

Tardigrades, which are usually less than a millimeter long (0.04 inches), are nearly indestructible, some of the most resilient forms of life on Earth. They can survive for up to 30 years without eating, and can be frozen, boiled, squished under intense pressure, and exposed to the vacuum and radiation of space without ill effect. The animal, which lives in water (and is also known as a "water bear," can survive for up to 60 years, according to a statement from the University of Oxford.

Source: Live Science

Also, for anyone who's interested, here are some general facts about them.

You like them, don't you?

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Claire.
2 hours ago, eugeneonegin said:

You like them, don't you?

Yes, very much. They're fascinating little creatures.

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Claire.

Here's an interesting article from Scientific American challenging just how tough these little critters really are:

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seaturtlehorsesnake

from the article:

Quote

It takes a biosphere to raise a water bear.

i want to hug this quote

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Claire.

Tardigrade genomes help explain how they survive without water

Tardigrades are spilling more of the secrets about their seeming invincibility. Genetic analysis of these tiny creatures, better known as water bears, is helping to unlock the mystery of how they can survive desiccation, and may also help to place them on the tree of life.

Read moreL New Scientist

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