Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Still Waters

Well preserved 3,500-year-old lunch box found

Recommended Posts

Still Waters

An incredibly rare wooden container from the Bronze Age has been discovered on the Lötschberg mountain in Switzerland, still with detectable traces of the grains that the box contained.

The box was found at the summit of the Lötschenpass, a transit through a glacier, at an elevation of about 2,650 metres above sea level. It's thought to have remained frozen since it was lost or abandoned by its owner in 1500 BCE.

Such discoveries are rare. Only one other similar artefact has been discovered, found in another alpine pass, the Schnidejoch, about 25km to the west of the Lötschenpass.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/amazingly-well-preserved-3500-year-old-lunch-box-discovered-swiss-alps-1632073

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Claire.

The lunch box would have been an incredible find in and of itself, but finding food in it is an amazing bonus. It will be interesting to learn what they are able to eventually determine from it, especially as it applies to the development of cereal farming.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Taun
26 minutes ago, Claire. said:

The lunch box would have been an incredible find in and of itself, but finding food in it is an amazing bonus. It will be interesting to learn what they are able to eventually determine from it, especially as it applies to the development of cereal farming.

Cereal farming - specifically wheat - has been going on since about 10,000 BC... The grains in the lunch box are closer to our time than to the development of cereal farming... The Egyptians were using yeast to make "rising bread" (like today's loaves) since about 3,000 BC...

But it's still a cool find...

http://www.allaboutwheat.info/history.html

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Claire.
3 minutes ago, Taun said:

Cereal farming - specifically wheat - has been going on since about 10,000 BC... The grains in the lunch box are closer to our time than to the development of cereal farming... The Egyptians were using yeast to make "rising bread" (like today's loaves) since about 3,000 BC...

But it's still a cool find...

http://www.allaboutwheat.info/history.html

I was referring specifically to Bronze Age Europe, but I appreciate the article as it provides a great deal of interesting information, organized in an easy to understand timeline. So thank you for that.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bean85

Taun: And the MC cheeseburger still in its wrapping

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RoofGardener
7 minutes ago, Bean85 said:

Taun: And the MC cheeseburger still in its wrapping

Best place for it ! :P

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Attila911us

Was it the kind of cereal that we eat today?
Like Fruit Loops or Lucky Charms?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gingitsune

The article mention "spelt, emmer and barley", not so mainstream anymore. Tastes change. :huh:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Krater

I was kind of hoping for a "Dukes of Hazzard" box with matching thermos. :(

Edited by Krater
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
third_eye

Bet the fries were soggy back then too ...

~

Edited by third_eye
dyslexia attack
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dyna

What an odd looking

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Dyna
2 hours ago, Dyna said:

What an odd looking Box!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.