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Mars has a twisted tail

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NASA’s MAVEN Mission Finds Mars Has a Twisted Tail

Mars has an invisible magnetic “tail” that is twisted by interaction with the solar wind, according to new research using data from NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft.

NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) spacecraft is in orbit around Mars gathering data on how the Red Planet lost much of its atmosphere and water, transforming from a world that could have supported life billions of years ago into a cold and inhospitable place today. The process that creates the twisted tail could also allow some of Mars’ already thin atmosphere to escape to space, according to the research team.

“We found that Mars’ magnetic tail, or magnetotail, is unique in the solar system,” said Gina DiBraccio of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “It’s not like the magnetotail found at Venus, a planet with no magnetic field of its own, nor is it like Earth’s, which is surrounded by its own internally generated magnetic field. Instead, it is a hybrid between the two.”

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/goddard/2017/mars-twisted-tail


 

 

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A cold metal heart maybe.

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I find this very interesting. Perhaps at one time it was much stronger?

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Refer to the You Tube series, The Electric Universe, and, Thunderbolts Project. Our universe is electric, our solar is also, there being a constant interplay of electric flow and charges amongst the sun and planets and objects entering our solar system. We are still learning how it all works but NASA is being disingenuous about their understanding of this.

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5 hours ago, seanjo said:

A cold metal heart maybe.

We can't expect less from the god of war, I suppose. 

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Would that magnetotail be of any use for shielding from radiation? 

If that'd be the case, maybe we could place the Lockheed and Martin space station in a geostationary orbit within that area, possibly with a satellite helping for communication with Earth. 

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23 hours ago, Parsec said:

 a geostationary orbit within that area, possibly with a satellite helping for communication with Earth. 

A geostationary orbit (or in the case of Mars an areostationary orbit) wouldn't help. Such an orbit keeps the satellite (or space station) above a single point on Mars. The magnetic tail streams away from Mars in the opposite direction to the Sun, so a station in areostationary orbit would sweep through the tail once every Martian day and spend most of it;s time outside of it.

What is needed is an orbit which keeps the station directly behind Mars in relation to the sun. Such an orbit exists, it is a halo orbit around the 2nd Sun-Mars Lagrangian point (known as L2). The problem with this is that it lies 1.09 million km (677,000 miles) beyond Mars. It is probably too far from Mars for the magnetic tail to protect the crew and certainly so far away as to negate the benefits of an orbital station to begin with.

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4 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

A geostationary orbit (or in the case of Mars an areostationary orbit) wouldn't help. Such an orbit keeps the satellite (or space station) above a single point on Mars. The magnetic tail streams away from Mars in the opposite direction to the Sun, so a station in areostationary orbit would sweep through the tail once every Martian day and spend most of it;s time outside of it.

What is needed is an orbit which keeps the station directly behind Mars in relation to the sun. Such an orbit exists, it is a halo orbit around the 2nd Sun-Mars Lagrangian point (known as L2). The problem with this is that it lies 1.09 million km (677,000 miles) beyond Mars. It is probably too far from Mars for the magnetic tail to protect the crew and certainly so far away as to negate the benefits of an orbital station to begin with.

Spot on Waspie thank you for the correction, I didn't think it through. 

Silly me! 

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With this revelation, I can't decide which is more interesting to explore first, the cause of Mars' magneto tail or the recently discovered cave of the Moon.

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